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The boss goes first

Seth Godin - Sun 19th Nov 2017 20:11
If you want to build a vibrant organizational culture, or govern with authority, or create a social dynamic that's productive and fair, the simple rule is: the rules apply to people in power before they are applied to those without....        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Like Mary Shelley

Seth Godin - Sat 18th Nov 2017 20:11
When she wrote Frankenstein, it changed everything. A different style of writing. A different kind of writer. And the use of technology in ways that no one expected and that left a mark. Henry Ford did that. One car and...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

The simple truth about net neutrality

Seth Godin - Sat 18th Nov 2017 06:11
It's not that complicated. It's based in history, it involves money and fairness and control. But it's not that complicated. If you care about the details, it's worth reading this classic from Tim Wu. There's no debate about how we...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Five contributions

Seth Godin - Fri 17th Nov 2017 20:11
Each one matters, each is intentional, each comes with effort, preparation and reward: Leader: The pathfinder, able to get from here to there, to connect in service of a goal. Setting an agenda, working in the dark, going new places...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Tim Serong: Hackweek0x10: Fun in the Sun

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 17th Nov 2017 19:11

We recently had a 5.94KW solar PV system installed – twenty-two 270W panels (14 on the northish side of the house, 8 on the eastish side), with an ABB PVI-6000TL-OUTD inverter. Naturally I want to be able to monitor the system, but this model inverter doesn’t have an inbuilt web server (which, given the state of IoT devices, I’m actually kind of happy about); rather, it has an RS-485 serial interface. ABB sell addon data logger cards for several hundred dollars, but Rick from Affordable Solar Tasmania mentioned he had another client who was doing monitoring with a little Linux box and an RS-485 to USB adapter. As I had a Raspberry Pi 3 handy, I decided to do the same.

Step one: Obtain an RS-485 to USB adapter. I got one of these from Jaycar. Yeah, I know I could have got one off eBay for a tenth the price, but Jaycar was only a fifteen minute drive away, so I could start immediately (I later discovered various RS-485 shields and adapters exist specifically for the Raspberry Pi – in retrospect one of these may have been more elegant, but by then I already had the USB adapter working).

Step two: Make sure the adapter works. It can do RS-485 and RS-422, so it’s got five screw terminals: T/R-, T/R+, RXD-, RXD+ and GND. The RXD lines can be ignored (they’re for RS-422). The other three connect to matching terminals on the inverter, although what the adapter labels GND, the inverter labels RTN. I plugged the adapter into my laptop, compiled Curt Blank’s aurora program, then asked the inverter to tell me something about itself:

Interestingly, the comms seem slightly glitchy. Just running aurora -a 2 -e /dev/ttyUSB0 always results in either “No response after 1 attempts” or “CRC receive error (1 attempts made)”. Adding “-Y 4″ makes it retry four times, which is generally rather more successful. Ten retries is even more reliable, although still not perfect. Clearly there’s some tweaking/debugging to do here somewhere, but at least I’d confirmed that this was going to work.

So, on to the Raspberry Pi. I grabbed the openSUSE Leap 42.3 JeOS image and dd’d that onto a 16GB SD card. Booted the Pi, waited a couple of minutes with a blank screen while it did its firstboot filesystem expansion thing, logged in, fiddled with network and hostname configuration, rebooted, and then got stuck at GRUB saying “error: attempt to read or write outside of partition”:

Apparently that’s happened to at least one other person previously with a Tumbleweed JeOS image. I fixed it by manually editing the partition table.

Next I needed an RPM of the aurora CLI, so I built one on OBS, installed it on the Pi, plugged the Pi into the USB adapter, and politely asked the inverter to tell me a bit more about itself:

Everything looked good, except that the booster temperature was reported as being 4294967296°C, which seemed a little high. Given that translates to 0×100000000, and that the south wall of my house wasn’t on fire, I rather suspected another comms glitch. Running aurora -a 2 -Y 4 -d 0 /dev/ttyUSB0 a few more times showed that this was an intermittent problem, so it was time to make a case for the Pi that I could mount under the house on the other side of the wall from the inverter.

I picked up a wall mount snap fit black plastic box, some 15mm x 3mm screws, matching nuts, and 9mm spacers. The Pi I would mount inside the box part, rather than on the back, meaning I can just snap the box-and-Pi off the mount if I need to bring it back inside to fiddle with it.

Then I had to measure up and cut holes in the box for the ethernet and USB ports. The walls of the box are 2.5mm thick, plus 9mm for the spacers meant the bottom of the Pi had to be 11.5mm from the bottom of the box. I measured up then used a Dremel tool to make the holes then cleaned them up with a file. The hole for the power connector I did by eye later after the board was in about the right place.

I didn’t measure for the screw holes at all, I simply drilled through the holes in the board while it was balanced in there, hanging from the edge with the ports. I initially put the screws in from the bottom of the box, dropped the spacers on top, slid the Pi in place, then discovered a problem: if the nuts were on top of the board, they’d rub up against a couple of components:

So I had to put the screws through the board, stick them there with Blu Tack, turn the Pi upside down, drop the spacers on top, and slide it upwards into the box, getting the screws as close as possible to the screw holes, flip the box the right way up, remove the Blu Tack and jiggle the screws into place before securing the nuts. More fiddly than I’d have liked, but it worked fine.

One other kink with this design is that it’s probably impossible to remove the SD card from the Pi without removing the Pi from the box, unless your fingers are incredibly thin and dexterous. I could have made another hole to provide access, but decided against it as I’m quite happy with the sleek look, this thing is going to be living under my house indefinitely, and I have no plans to replace the SD card any time soon.

All that remained was to mount it under the house. Here’s the finished install:

After that, I set up a cron job to scrape data from the inverter every five minutes and dump it to a log file. So far I’ve discovered that there’s enough sunlight by about 05:30 to wake the inverter up. This morning we’d generated 1KW by 08:35, 2KW by 09:10, 8KW by midday, and as I’m writing this at 18:25, a total of 27.134KW so far today.

Next steps:

  1. Figure out WTF is up with the comms glitches
  2. Graph everything and/or feed the raw data to pvoutput.org
Categories: thinktime

OpenSTEM: This Week in HASS – term 4, week 7

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 17th Nov 2017 11:11
This week our younger students are preparing for their play/ role-playing presentation, whilst older students are practising a full preferential count to determine the outcome of their Class Election. Foundation/Prep/Kindy to Year 3 Our youngest students in Foundation/Prep/Kindy (Unit F.4) and integrated classes with Year 1 (Unit F-1.4) are working on the costumes, props and […]
Categories: thinktime

The confusion about competence

Seth Godin - Thu 16th Nov 2017 21:11
A friend was describing a clerk he had recently dealt with. "She was competent, of course, but she couldn't engage very well with the customer who just came in." Then, of course, she wasn't competent, was she? It doesn't take...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Outsiders

Seth Godin - Wed 15th Nov 2017 20:11
You can't have insiders unless you have outsiders. And you can't have winners unless you have losers. That doesn't mean that you're required to create insiders and winners. All it means is that when people begin to measure themselves only...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

James Morris: Save the Dates: Linux Security Summit Events for 2018

Planet Linux Australia - Wed 15th Nov 2017 11:11

There will be a new European version of the Linux Security Summit for 2018, in addition to the established North American event.

The dates and locations are as follows:

Stay tuned for CFP announcements!

 

Categories: thinktime

Feedback That Gives Focus

a list apart - Wed 15th Nov 2017 02:11

I have harbored a lifelong dislike of feedback. I didn’t like it in sixth grade when a kid on the bus told me my brand new sneakers were “too bright.” And I didn’t like it when a senior executive heard my pitch for a digital project and said, “I hate this idea.” Turns out my sneakers were pretty bright, and my pitch wasn’t the best idea. Still, those experiences and many others like them didn’t help me learn to stop worrying and love the feedback process.

We can’t avoid feedback. Processing ideas and synthesizing feedback is a big part of what we do for a living. I have had plenty of opportunities to consider why both giving and receiving feedback is often so emotionally charged, so challenging to get right.

And here’s what I’ve found to be true.

When a project is preoccupying us at work, we often don’t think about it as something external and abstract. We think about it more like a story, with ourselves in the middle as the protagonist—the hero. That might seem melodramatic, especially if your work isn’t the kind of thing they’d make an inspirational movie about. But there’s research to back this up: humans use stories to make sense of the world and our place within it.

Our work is no different. We create a story in our heads about how far we’ve come on a project and about where we’re going. This makes discussing feedback dangerous. It’s the place where someone else swoops in and hijacks your story.

Speaking personally, I notice that when I’m giving feedback (and feeling frustrated), the story in my head goes like this: These people don’t get it. How can I force them into thinking the same way I do so that we can fix everything that’s wrong with this project, and in the end, I don’t feel like a failure?

Likewise, when I’m receiving feedback (and feeling defensive), the story goes like this: These people don’t get it. How can I defend our work so that we keep everything that I like about this project, and in the end, I don’t feel like a failure?

Both of these postures are ultimately counterproductive because they are focused inward. They’re really about avoiding shame. Both the person giving and receiving feedback are on opposing sides of the equation, protecting their turf.

But like a good story, good feedback can take us out of ourselves, allowing us to see the work more clearly. It can remove the artificial barrier between feedback giver and receiver, refocusing both on shared goals.

Change your habits around feedback, and you can change the story of your project.

Here are three ways to think about feedback that might help you do just that.

Good feedback helps us understand how we got here

Here’s a story for you. I was presenting some new wireframes for an app to the creative leads on the project. There were a number of stakeholders and advisors on the project, and I had integrated several rounds of their feedback into the harmonious and brilliant vision that I was presenting in this meeting. That’s the way I hoped the story would go, anyway.

But at the end of the meeting, I got some of the best, worst feedback I have ever received: “We’ve gotten into our heads a little bit with this concept. Maybe it should be simpler. Maybe something more like this …” And they handed me a loose sketch on paper to illustrate a new, simpler approach. I had come for sign-off but left with a do-over.

I felt ashamed. How could I have missed that? Even though that feedback was hard to hear, I walked away able to make important changes, which led to a better outcome in the end. Here are the reasons why:

First, the feedback started as a conversation. Conversations (rather than written notes) make it easier to verify assumptions. When you talk face-to-face you can ask open-ended questions and clarify intent, so you don’t jump to conclusions. Talking helps you find where the trouble is much faster.

The feedback connected the dots between problems in our process so far (trying to reconcile too many competing ideas) and how it led to the current result (an overly complicated product). The person who gave the feedback helped me see how we got to where we were, without assigning blame or shaming me in the process.

The feedback was direct. They didn’t try to mask the fact that the concept wasn’t working. Veiled or vague criticism does more harm than good; the same negativity comes through but without a clear sense of what to do next.

Good feedback invites each person to contribute their best work No thought, no idea, can possibly be conveyed as an idea from one person to another. … Only by wrestling with the conditions of the problem … first hand … does he think. John Dewey, Democracy and Education

Here’s another story. I was the producer on an app-based game, and the team was working on a part of the user interface that the player would use again and again. I was convinced that the current design didn’t “feel” right. I kept pushing for a change, against the input of others, and I gave the team some specific feedback about what I wanted to see done. The designers played along and tried it out. But it became clear that my feedback wasn’t helping, and the design director (gently) stepped in and steered us out of my design tangent and back on course.

John Dewey had it right in that quote above; you can’t think for someone else. And that’s exactly what I was doing: giving specific solutions without inviting the team to engage with the problem. And the results were worse for it.

It’s very tempting to use feedback to cajole and control people into doing things your way. But that usually leads to mediocre results. You have a team for a reason: you can’t possibly do everything on your own. Instead, when giving feedback try to remember that you’re building a team of individual contributors that will work together to make a better end product.

Here are a few feedback habits that help avoid the trap of using feedback to control, and instead, bring out the best in people.

Don’t give feedback until the timing is right

Feedback isn’t useful if it’s given before the work is really ready to be looked at. It’s also not useful to give feedback if you have not taken the time to look at the work and think about it in advance. If you rush either of these, the feedback will devolve into a debate about what could have been, rather than what’s actually there now. That invites confusion, defensiveness, and inefficiency.

Be just specific enough

Good feedback should have enough specifics to clearly identify the problem. But, usually, it’s better to not give a specific solution. The feedback in this example goes too far:

The background behind the menu items is a light blue on a darker blue. This makes it hard to see some options. Change the background fill to white and add a thin, red border around each square. When an option is selected, perhaps the inside border should glow red but not fill in all the way.

Instead, feedback that clearly identifies the problem is probably enough:

The background behind the menu items makes it a little hard for me to see some options. Any way we might make it easier to read?

Give the person whose job it is to solve the problem the room to do just that.  They might solve it in a better way that you hadn’t anticipated.

Admit when you’re wrong

When you acknowledge a mistake openly and without fear, it gives permission for others on the team to do the same. This refocuses energies away from ego-protection and toward problem solving. I chose to admit I got it wrong on that app project I mentioned above; the designers had it right and I told them I was glad they stuck to their guns. Saying that out loud was actually easier than I thought, and our working relationship was better for it.

Good feedback tells a story about the future In my writing, as much as I could, I tried to find the good, and praise it. Alex Haley

We’ve said that good feedback connects past assumptions and decisions to current results, without assigning blame. Good feedback also identifies issues in a timely and specific way, giving people room to find novel solutions and contribute their best work.

Lastly, I’ve found that most useful feedback helps us look beyond the present state of our work and builds a shared vision of where we’re headed.

One of maybe the most overlooked tools for building that shared vision is actually pretty simple: positive feedback. The best positive feedback acknowledges great work that’s already complete, doing so in a way that is future-focused.  Its purpose is to point out what we want to do more of as we move forward.

In practice, I’ve found that I can become stingy with positive feedback, especially when it’s early in a project and there’s so much work ahead of us. Maybe this is because I’m afraid that mentioning the good things will distract us from what’s still in need of improvement.

But ironically, the opposite is true: it becomes easier to fix what’s broken once you have something (however small) that you know is working well and that you can begin to build that larger vision around.

So be equally direct about what’s working as you are with what isn’t, and you’ll find it becomes easier to rally a team around a shared vision for the future.  The first signs of that future can be found right here in the present.

Like Mr. Haley said: find the good and praise it.

Oh and one more thing: say thank you.

Thank people for their contributions. Let me give that a try right now:

It seemed wise to get some feedback from others when writing about feedback. So thanks to everyone in the PBS KIDS family of producers who generously shared their thoughts and experience with me in preparation of this article. I look forward to hearing your feedback.

Categories: thinktime

Meaningful work

Seth Godin - Tue 14th Nov 2017 20:11
Of course, it came with chocolate. There's no doubt that we're doing more running around than ever before. More cutting of corners, counting of pennies, reading of reviews. More focus on making a profit, less on making a difference. But...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Francois Marier: Test mail server on Ubuntu and Debian

Planet Linux Australia - Mon 13th Nov 2017 22:11

I wanted to setup a mail service on a staging server that would send all outgoing emails to a local mailbox. This avoids sending emails out to real users when running the staging server using production data.

First, install the postfix mail server:

apt install postfix

and choose the "Local only" mail server configuration type.

Then change the following in /etc/postfix/main.cf:

default_transport = error

to:

default_transport = local:root

and restart postfix:

systemctl restart postfix.service

Once that's done, you can find all of the emails in /var/mail/root.

So you can install mutt:

apt install mutt

and then view the mailbox like this:

mutt -f /var/mail/root
Categories: thinktime

Full vs. enough

Seth Godin - Mon 13th Nov 2017 19:11
One of the lessons of Thanksgiving is that we eat too much. We eat until we're full, experiencing the sensation of too much. It's easy to confuse our desire for that that feeling with the feeling of 'enough'. Enough doesn't...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Lev Lafayette: Rattus Norvegicus ESTs with BLAST and Slurm

Planet Linux Australia - Mon 13th Nov 2017 15:11

The following is a short tutorial on using BLAST with Slurm using fasta nucleic acid (fna) FASTA formatted sequence files for Rattus Norvegicus. It assumes that BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) is already installed.

First, create a database directory, download the datafile, extract, and load the environment variables for BLAST.


mkdir -r ~/applicationtests/BLAST/dbs
cd ~/applicationtests/BLAST/dbs
wget ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/refseq/R_norvegicus/mRNA_Prot/rat.1.rna.fna.gz
gunzip rat.1.rna.fna.gz
module load BLAST/2.2.26-Linux_x86_64

Having extracted the file, there will be a fna formatted sequence file, rat.1.rna.fna. An example header line for a sequence:

>NM_175581.3 Rattus norvegicus cathepsin R (Ctsr), mRNA

read more

Categories: thinktime

Linux Users of Victoria (LUV) Announce: LUV Main December 2017 Meeting

Planet Linux Australia - Sun 12th Nov 2017 23:11
Start: Dec 5 2017 18:30 End: Dec 5 2017 20:30 Start: Dec 5 2017 18:30 End: Dec 5 2017 20:30 Location:  Mail Exchange Hotel, 688 Bourke St, Melbourne VIC 3000 Link:  http://mailexchangehotel.com.au/

PLEASE NOTE NEW LOCATION

Speakers to be announced.

Mail Exchange Hotel, 688 Bourke St, Melbourne VIC 3000

Food and drinks will be available on premises.

Linux Users of Victoria is a subcommittee of Linux Australia.

December 5, 2017 - 18:30
Categories: thinktime

Linux Users of Victoria (LUV) Announce: LUV November 2017 Workshop

Planet Linux Australia - Sun 12th Nov 2017 23:11
Start: Nov 18 2017 12:30 End: Nov 18 2017 16:30 Start: Nov 18 2017 12:30 End: Nov 18 2017 16:30 Location:  Infoxchange, 33 Elizabeth St. Richmond Link:  http://luv.asn.au/meetings/map

Topic to be announced.

There will also be the usual casual hands-on workshop, Linux installation, configuration and assistance and advice. Bring your laptop if you need help with a particular issue. This will now occur BEFORE the talks from 12:30 to 14:00. The talks will commence at 14:00 (2pm) so there is time for people to have lunch nearby.

The meeting will be held at Infoxchange, 33 Elizabeth St. Richmond 3121 (enter via the garage on Jonas St.) Late arrivals, please call (0421) 775 358 for access to the venue.

LUV would like to acknowledge Infoxchange for the venue.

Linux Users of Victoria is a subcommittee of Linux Australia.

November 18, 2017 - 12:30
Categories: thinktime

Been done before

Seth Godin - Sun 12th Nov 2017 20:11
What percentage of the work you do each day is work where the process (the 'right answer') is known? Jobs where you replicate a process instead of inventing one... The place where we can create the most value is when...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Clinton Roy: Access and Memory: Open GLAM and Open Source

Planet Linux Australia - Sun 12th Nov 2017 17:11

Over the years of my involvement with library projects, like Coder Dojo, programming workshops and such, I’ve struggled to nail down the intersection between libraries and open source. At this years linux.conf.au in Sydney (my seventeenth!) I’m helping to put together a miniconf to answer this question: Open GLAM. If you do work in the intersection of galleries, libraries, archives, musuems and open source, we’d love to hear from you.


Filed under: lca, oss, Uncategorized
Categories: thinktime

Speakerphone voice

Seth Godin - Sat 11th Nov 2017 20:11
When the speakerphone is on in the conference room, do you talk differently? It's pretty common. We breathe from a different spot, hold our chest differently, constrict our throats and generally try to shout our words across the ocean. The...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Everyone else is irrational

Seth Godin - Fri 10th Nov 2017 20:11
Everyone else makes bad decisions, is shortsighted, prejudiced, subject to whims, temper tantrums, outbursts and short-term thinking. Once you see it that way, it's easier to remember... that we're everyone too.        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

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