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Sridhar Dhanapalan: Twitter posts: 2015-02-23 to 2015-03-01

Planet Linux Australia - Mon 02nd Mar 2015 01:03
Categories: thinktime

Sorry confusion

Seth Godin - Sun 01st Mar 2015 21:03
There are two kinds of, "I'm sorry." The first kind is the apology of responsibility, of blame and of litigation. It is the four-year old saying to his brother, "I'm sorry I hit you in the face." And it is...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Planet Linux Australia - Sun 01st Mar 2015 16:03

A quite full on day.

Woke up early because..that’s what I do. Headed out to Sunnybank library in the morning, CoderDojo, then back to The Edge for minicomicon, where I picked up a few small freebies, but didn’t spot anything that I felt like buying. I spent a little time coding up a simple Markov generator, hopefully simple enough for the coder dojo folks to follow. After all that, out to Humbug.



Filed under: diary
Categories: thinktime

David Rowe: SM1000 Part 11 – Accepting Pre-orders!

Planet Linux Australia - Sun 01st Mar 2015 07:03

The first batch of 100 SM1000s are being built in China right now and we estimate shipping will start in late March. Due to popular demand I am accepting pre-orders right now!

Australian customers can buy directly from my Store, rest of the world please use the Aliexpress Store for direct shipping from Shenzhen, China.

Thanks Rick KA8BMA and Edwin from Dragino for all your kind help!

Categories: thinktime

If you want...

Seth Godin - Sat 28th Feb 2015 21:02
If you want employees to go job hunting in order to leverage you into giving them a raise to keep them, then by all means, only give them a raise when they go job hunting. If you want vendors to...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

On Our Radar: Communication Builds Community

a list apart - Sat 28th Feb 2015 03:02

This week, we at ALA have been thinking about processes of inclusion—that is, how we communicate with our communities. Who (and what) gets to be included? How do we use vocabularies, fonts, even emojis, to make those choices? And how do those choices create our culture?

Here’s what’s on our radar:

Anna Debenham, technical editor:
The UX team at Salesforce have written about the difficulties they’ve had coming up with color schemes that look good and meet the WCAG2 guidelines on color contrast—so they’ve built a wonderful site called Color Safe that generates color palettes that meet these guidelines. It’s great to see companies release tools like this that help make everyone’s sites more accessible.

Marie Connelly, blog editor:
I really loved this piece over on Hopes & Fears on how the Deaf community is incorporating new terminology (think: selfie, photobomb) into American Sign Language. It touches on so many things I love: words, the subtle complexities of language, and the beautiful messiness of community collaboration. I think the examples of how the Deaf community works through this process offer great food for thought for any of us working on content and communication.

Caren Litherland, editor:
“I’m pretty content,” writes Indra Kupferschmid in a pragmatic survey of the current state of web typography. Almost anything we could ever do in print, we can now do on the web; the web “forces us to think about typography in terms of parameters and to get clear about content versus form.”

Ethan Marcotte, technical editor:
Kathy Sierra’s essay on skater culture is a fascinating, moving look at a once-inclusive industry that, over time, marginalized its female members. It’s also an urgent warning for the digital industry, which faces a similar crisis.

A gif about a music video we are into:

No outline will ever hold us.

What about you?
What stories are drawing your attention? Got any posts, pictures, tools, or code you want to share? (We love sharing!) Tweet us what’s on your radar—and what should be on ours.

Categories: thinktime

Here comes 'uh oh'

Seth Godin - Fri 27th Feb 2015 21:02
Everyone has one. That feeling of here we go again, the trap we fall into, the moment of vulnerability. And your 'uh oh' might not be the same as mine. Not a specific fear, but a soft spot, a situational...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 27th Feb 2015 20:02

I went to bed really early last night due to my weird ongoing headache. I had a little help getting to sleep. This meant I basically had a full nights sleep by three o’clock. So I ended up walking to work stupidly early and arriving before five am. I still had some residual effects of the whatever-the-heck headache in the morning, but it’s gone by the evening.

The internet was really weird today, llamas and dresses for some reason.

Doing some conf stuff at The Edge. See three friends walk past on the walkway :)



Filed under: diary
Categories: thinktime

Binh Nguyen: Fried Rice Recipe

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 27th Feb 2015 20:02
This is based on a family recipe, recipes online, and an interpretation by local restaurants that I used to frequent. While there are other alternative recipes that possibly taste better, I find that this is the quickest and easiest version.

- chinese sausage

- rice

- eggs

- onion

- garlic

- tomato sauce

- salt- sugar

- soy sauce

- spring onion (optional)

 - dried shrimp (optional)

- shitake mushrooms (optional)

- lettuce (optional)

- fried shallot (optional)

- prawns (optional)

- Chinese BBQ Pork (also called char-siu/charsiu. See elsewhere on this blog for this recipe)



Sautee onion, garlic, chinese sausage in pan. Fry egg and then shred so that it can be mixed through rice more easily later on. Add rice and then add the rest of the diced/chopped ingredients. Add salt, sugar, soy sauce, etc... to taste. Garnish with shredded lettuce and fried shallots.



The following is what it looks like.

http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/1351/chinese+fried+rice

http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/15297/easy+fried+rice

http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/collections/fried+rice+recipes
Categories: thinktime

Jeff Waugh: A(nother) new era of WordPress

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 27th Feb 2015 12:02

The other night at WordPress Sydney, I dropped a five minute brain-dump about some cool things going on in the web ecosystem that herald a new era of WordPress. That’s a decent enough excuse to blog for the first time in two years, right?

I became a WordPress user 9 years ago, not long after the impressive 2.0 release. I was a happy pybloxsom user, but WordPress 2.0 hit a sweet spot of convenience, ease of use, and compelling features. It was impossible to ignore: I signed up for Linode just so I could use WordPress. You’re reading the same blog on (almost) the same Linode, 9 years later!

WordPress

Fast forward to 2015 and WordPress powers 20% of the web. It’s still here because it is a great product.

It’s a great product because it’s built by a vibrant, diverse Open Source community with a fantastic core team, that cares deeply about user experience, that mentors and empowers new contributors (and grooms or cajoles them to become leaders), and isn’t afraid of the ever-changing web.

Another reason for the long term success of WordPress is that it’s built on the unkillable cockroach of the world wide web: PHP.

I won’t expound on the deficiencies of PHP in this post. Suffice to say that WordPress has thrived on PHP’s ubiquity and ease of adoption, while suffering its mediocrity and recent (albeit now firmly interrupted) stagnation.

HHVM

The HipHop Virtual Machine is Facebook’s high performance PHP runtime. They started work on an alternative because PHP is… wait for it… not very efficient.

Unless you’ve goofed something up, the slowest part of your PHP-based application should be PHP itself. Other parts of your stack may exhibit scaling problems that affect response times, but in terms of raw performance, PHP is the piggy in the middle of your web server and data stores.

“But like I said, performance isn’t everything.” — Andi Gutmans

What is the practical implication of “performance isn’t everything”? Slow response times, unhappy users, more servers, increased power utilisation, climate change, and death.

Facebook’s project was released in 2010 as the HipHop compiler, which transpiled PHP code into C++ code, which was then compiled into a gigantic monolithic binary, HTTP server included.

In early 2013, HipHop was superseded by HHVM, a jitting virtual machine. It still seemed pretty weird and awkward on the surface, but by late 2013 the HHVM developers added support for FastCGI.

So today, deployment of HHVM looks and feels familiar to anyone who has used php-fpm.

Want to strap a rocket to your WordPress platform? I strongly recommend experimenting with HHVM, if not putting it into production… like, say, Wikipedia.

Hack

Not content with nuking PHP runtime stagnation, the HHVM developers decided to throw some dynamite in the pants of PHP language stagnation by announcing their new Hack language. It’s a bunch of incremental improvements to PHP, bringing modern features to the language in a familiar way.

Imagine you could get in a DeLorean, go back to 2005, and take care of PHP development properly. You’d end up with something like Hack.

Hack brings performance opportunities to the table that the current PHP language alone could not. You’ve heard all those JavaScript hipsters (hi!) extolling the virtues of asynchronous programming, right? Hack can do that, without what some describe as “callback hell”.

Asynchronous programming means you can do things while you wait. Such as… turning database rows into HTML while more database rows are coming down the wire. Which is pretty much what WordPress does. Among other things.

Based on the WordPress team’s conservative approach to PHP dependency updates, it’s unlikely we’ll see WordPress using Hack any time soon. But it has let the PHP community (and particularly Zend) taste the chill wind of irrelevance, so PHP is moving again.

WP-API

Much closer to WordPress itself, the big change on the horizon is WP-API, which turns your favourite publishing platform into a complete and easy-to-use publishing API.

If you’re not familiar with APIs, think about it this way: If you cut off all the user interface bits of WordPress, but kept all the commands for managing your data, and then made them really easy to use from other applications or web sites, you’d have a WordPress API.

But what’s the point of stripping off all the user interface bits of WordPress? Aren’t they the famously good bits? Well, yes. But you could make even better ones built on top of the API!

Today, there’s a huge amount of PHP code in WordPress dedicated to making the admin user interface so damn good. There’s also a lot of JavaScript code involved, making it nice and interactive in your browser.

With WP-API, you could get rid of all that PHP code, do less work on the server, and build the entire admin user interface in the browser with JavaScript. That might sound strange, but it’s how most modern web applications are built today. WordPress can adapt… again!

One of the things I love about WordPress is that you can make it look like anything you wish. Most of the sites I’ve worked on don’t look anything like traditional blogs. WP-API kicks that up a notch.

If you’ve ever built a theme, you’ll know about “the loop”. It’s the way WordPress exposes data to themes, in the form of a PHP API, and lots of themers find it frustrating. Instead of WordPress saying, “here are the posts you wanted, do what you like”, it makes you work within the loop API, which drip-feeds posts to you one at a time.

WP-API completely inverts that. You ask WordPress for the data you want — say, the first ten posts in May — then what you do with it, and how, is 100% up to you.

There’s way more potential for a WordPress API, though. A fully-featured mobile client, integration with legacy publishing systems at your newspaper, custom posting interfaces for specific kinds of users, etc., etc., etc.

The best bit is that WP-API is going to be part of WordPress. It’s a matter of “when”, not “if”, and core WordPress features are being built today with the WP-API merge in mind.

React

According to its creators, “React is a JavaScript library for building user interfaces”, but it’s way cooler than that. If you’re building complex, interactive interfaces (like, say, the admin back-end of a publishing platform), the React way of thinking is fireworks by the megaton.

For all the hype it enjoys today, Facebook launched React in 2013 to immense wailing and gnashing of teeth. It mixed HTML (presentation) and JavaScript (logic) in a way that reminded developers of the bad old days of PHP. They couldn’t see past it. Some still can’t. But that was always a facile distraction from the key ideas that inspired React.

The guts beneath most user interfaces, on the web or desktop, look like a mad scientist’s chemistry lab. Glass everywhere, weird stuff bubbling over a Bunsen burner at one end, an indecipherable, interdependent maze of piping, and dangerous chemical reactions… you’d probably lose a hand if you moved anything.

React is a champagne pyramid compared to the mad chemistry lab of traditional events and data-binding.

It stresses a one-way flow: Data goes in one end, user interface comes out the other. Data is transformed into interface definitions by components that represent logical chunks of your application, such as a tool bar, notification, or comment form.

Want to make a change? Instead of manipulating a specific part of the user interface, just change the data. The whole user interface will be rebuilt — sounds crazy, right? — but only the changes will be rendered.

The one-way data flow through logical components makes React-based code easy to read, easy to reason about, and cranks your web interface to Ludicrous Speed.

Other libraries and frameworks are already borrowing ideas, but based on adoption to date, number of related projects, and quality of maintenance, I reckon React itself will stick around too.

Connecting the Dots

It won’t happen overnight, but WP-API will dramatically reduce the amount of active PHP code in WordPress, starting with the admin back-end. It will become a JavaScript app that talks to the WP-API sooner than anyone suspects.

Front-end (read: theme) development will change at a slower pace, because rendering HTML on the server side is still the right thing to do for performance and search. But themers will have the option to ditch the traditional loop for an internal, non-remoting version of the WP-API.

There’ll be some mostly-dead code maintained for backwards compatibility (because that’s how the dev team rolls), but on the whole, the PHP side of WordPress will be a lean, mean, API-hosting machine.

Which means there’s going to be even more JavaScript involved. Reckon that’s going to be built the same way as today? Nuh-uh. One taste of React in front of WP-API, and I reckon the jQuery and Backbone era will be finished.

In WordPress itself, most of this will affect how the admin back-end is built, but we’ll also see some great WordPress-as-application examples in the near future. Think Parse-style app development, but with WordPress as the Open Source, self-hosted, user-controlled API services layer behind the scenes.

What about HHVM? You’re going to want your lean, mean, API-hosting machine to run fast and, in some cases, scale big. Unless the PHP team surprises everyone by embracing the JVM, I reckon the future looks more like HHVM than FPM (even with touted PHP 7 performance improvements).

Once HHVM is popular enough, having side-by-side PHP and Hack implementations of  core WordPress data grinding functions will begin to look attractive. If you’ve got MySQL on one side, a JSON consumer on the other, and asynchronous I/O available in between, you may as well do it efficiently. (Maybe PHP will adopt async/await. See you in 2020?)

End

Look, what I’m trying to say is that it’s a pretty good time to be caught up in the world of WordPress, isn’t it?

Categories: thinktime

Binh Nguyen: Chicken Curry Recipe

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 27th Feb 2015 05:02
This is based on a family recipe.

- chicken

- sugar

- salt

- pepper

- garlic

- curry

- onion

- carrot

- potato

- fish sauce

- coconut milk

- curry mix (powder or liquid)(optional)

- tomatoes (optional)



Marinate chicken in sugar/salt/pepper/garlic/curry powder mixture. Brown off chicken in pan. In the meantime, dice vegetables and put into microwave for short period to speed up cooking time. Put all vegetables into pan. Add coconut milk and possibly a curry mix (to boost the flavour) to pan to create sauce. Use fish sauce to taste. Goes well with white rice or else bread.



The following is what it looks like. 

http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/7378/coconut+chicken+curry

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1993658/homestyle-chicken-curry
Categories: thinktime

Binh Nguyen: Szechuan Pork Mince Recipe

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 27th Feb 2015 05:02
This is based on recipes online and an interpretation by a local restaurants that I used to frequent. While there are other alternative recipes that possibly taste better, I find that this is the quickest and easiest version.   - pork mince

- salt

- sugar

- pepper

- chilli bean paste

- rice wine

- soy sauce

- tofu (fried or fresh)

- soy sauce

- garlic (optional)

- ginger (optional)

- caramel (optional)

- green beans (optional)



Marinade pork mince in salt/sugar/pepper/rice wine/soy sauce. Fry off off mince in wok/pan. Add chilli bean taste. Add sugar, pepper, soy, caramel, etc... sauce to taste. Slice tofu, put into microwave for 30 seconds and drain liquid, and stir through sauce. Fry off green beans in the meantime and add into mixture if you want at this point. Water down sauce if it gets too thick.



Goes well with a asian chicken soup (use pre-made or make a quick one using carrots, celery, onion, chicken bones, water, pepper, salt, pepper, soy sauce, and fish sauce) and steamed white rice.



The following is what it looks like.

http://www.girlichef.com/2014/03/Szechuan-Green-Beans-with-Ground-Pork.html

http://www.cookinglight.com/food/in-season/green-bean-recipes/szechuan-green-beans-ground-pork
Categories: thinktime

Antoine Lefeuvre on The Web, Worldwide: Designing for Post-Connected Users — Part 1, the Diagnostic

a list apart - Fri 27th Feb 2015 00:02

I toured the world twice—first in 2009–10, then in 2013–14. Only four years between the two trips, but it felt like a century internet-wise. Where I had to go wifi-hunting in 2009, in 2014 the web was absolutely everywhere—even in places with no mobile coverage, such as remote El Chaltén in Argentine Patagonia. Yet, I had the feeling this advent of a truly connected world wasn’t much cause for celebration. Indeed, I met many who struggled with an increasing need to disconnect.

 

I’m so glad I’m taking a year off. Off from work, off from stress, off from modern life.

…Do you have WhatsApp?

Twenty-something European trekker in Northern Laos

I heard this line from fellow travelers numerous times, be it in Laos, Costa Rica, or New Zealand. I actually said it myself! As absurd as it sounds, it’s a perfect illustration of our ambiguous relationship with the internet.

Hyper-connected, hypo-social

Has the internet become repulsive? It certainly has in the eyes of Italian artist Francesco Sambo. His HyperConnection series depicts a dark and creepy humanity transformed—or tortured—by technology. Strikingly, Sambo is a savvy internet user, showcasing his work through Behance and SoundCloud.

HyperConnection, CC BY-NC-ND, Francesco Sambo.

Artists are often the first to capture the collective unconscious. Antisocial network I and II by Congolese artist Maurice Mbikayi are skulls made out of keyboards. “The […] sculptures ask questions such as to whom such technological resources are made available and at what or whose expense? What are the consequences impacting on our people and environment?” states Mbikayi. Less morbid but equally shocking is the alienation depicted in the Strangers in the Light series by French photographer Catherine Balet. In a very visual way, she questions us: are our babies born in a mad world?
Strangers in the Light by Catherine Balet -->

Digital malaise

Not only does hyper-connection alter our social relationships, it also makes us dumber, as pointed out as early as 2005. It threatens our health too. Twenty-first-century afflictions include digital fatigue, social media burnout or compulsive internet use.

Cures for these rising internet-related disorders include such radical solutions as rehab centers, or disconnection.

“I was wrong”

Most of the experiments in living offline have begun with the same cause and led to the same conclusion: the internet drives us crazy, but it brings us much more than we realize.

“The internet isn’t an individual pursuit, it’s something we do with each other. The internet is where people are,” says journalist Paul Miller in his famous “I was wrong” piece on The Verge. When you disconnect, you’re not just cutting the link with a network of computers, you’re actually isolating yourself from the rest of society. Miller also emphasizes that there is no such thing as a divide between virtuality and reality. To me, the best example of this is the sharing economy of “virtual” communities such as AirBnb or Kickstarter that is all about changing the “real” world.

The cure is worse than the disease

A lot of people today feel torn between two extremes. They aren’t against modern ways of interaction per se, but they won’t close their eyes to the excesses. The concern becomes even greater when the developing minds of children and teenagers are at stake. Many parents believe their digital-native offspring aren’t capable of using the internet moderately. You can’t blame them when you come across stats such as 20 percent of French young people are addicted to their mobile.

Is disconnection the only alternative to unhealthy internet use? That cure is worse than the disease. There must be another way.
Internet users are ripe for a new era, for the next step. A “more asserted, more mature” use, in the words of Thierry Crouzet, another famous disconnectee. Neither hyper- nor dis-connected: post-connected.

I see the advent of post-connected users wary of addictive or invasive tools. Post-connected users are also well aware that a social network centered on the individual, rather than on the group, inevitably leads to narcissism. They see the internet as a means for more direct human relationships—not a thing that feeds on our continual attention.

The internet pictured as monstrous should sadden us all, for it is one of mankind’s greatest inventions, one which has done so much for knowledge, education and human rights. Besides, it isn’t addictive by nature, we have turned into a drug.

We are the drug dealers

We love it if other people listen to us. Why else would you tweet?

Psychologist James Pennebaker at the University of Texas at Austin interviewed by WSJ

We, the web makers, have designed interactions which encourage selfishness and competition. We created tools that cause fatigue and stress. We practically invented hyper-connection.

It is therefore our responsibility to design for post-connected users. If we’ve been powerful enough to create addiction, then we must surely have the resources to imagine post-connected user experiences. How? I’ll give you some leads in my next column.

In the meantime, I would very much like to discuss this topic with you. Have you ever felt the urge to disconnect? Do you agree there is such a thing as post-connected users? Would you say addiction is the sign of a successful design? Your comments, criticism, and true stories are most welcome.

Categories: thinktime

Binh Nguyen: Vietnamese Grilled Lemongrass Pork Chop Recipe

Planet Linux Australia - Thu 26th Feb 2015 22:02
This is based on recipes online and an interpretation by a korean/japanese fusion restaurant that I used to frequent. While there are other alternative recipe that possibly taste better, I find that this is the quickest and easiest version.  - pork chops- sugar

- garlic

- shallot or yellow onion- lemongrass

- pepper

- soy sauce

- fish sauce- rice wine vinegar

- oil

Coat pork with bicarbonate soda if desired (meat tenderiser) and then wash off in cold water. Create marinade sauce by starting with liquids and then adding sugar, soy sauce, garlic, etc... Marinade pork with sauce. Cook rice in meantime. Pan fry pork and then place under grill for quicker results or else place directly in grill/oven/bbq from start to finish. 

 Goes well with a asian chicken soup (use pre-made or make a quick one using carrots, celery, onion, chicken bones, water, pepper, salt, pepper, soy sauce, and fish sauce) and steamed white rice, fried eggs, pickled carrot or cucumber (sliced finely and dressed with vinegar and sugar) and nuoc mam as a sauce.

http://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/vietnamese-dressing-nuoc-mam-cham?cid=trending

The following is what it looks like.  http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/vietnamese-pork-chops

http://www.vietworldkitchen.com/blog/2009/04/vietnamese-restaurantstyle-grilled-lemongrass-pork-thit-heo-nuong-xa.html

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/vietnamese-pork-chops-51169530http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/grilled-pork-chops-with-sweet-lemongrass-marinade-51115010http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/vietnamese-pork-chops
Categories: thinktime

Binh Nguyen: Chinese Roast (BBQ) Pork Recipe

Planet Linux Australia - Thu 26th Feb 2015 22:02
This is based on recipes online and an interpretation by local restaurants that I used to frequent. While there are other alternative recipe that possibly taste better, I find that this is the quickest and easiest version. - pork

- soy sauce

- hoisin sauce

- Chinese rice cooking wine

- sugar

- garlic

- honey (optional)- pepper (optional)- oyster sauce (optional)

- star anise (optional)

- red food colouring (powder or liquid)Split (if too large to fit into oven/grill) pork if required. Coat pork with bicarbonate soda if desired (meat tenderiser) and then wash off in cold water. Create marinade sauce by starting with hoy sin sauce and then adding sugar, soy sauce, garlic, etc... Marinade pork with sauce. Cook rice in meantime. Pan fry pork and then place under grill for quicker results or else place directly in grill/oven/bbq from start to finish. 

Goes well with a asian chicken soup (use pre-made or make a quick one using carrots, celery, onion, chicken bones, water, pepper, salt, pepper, soy sauce, and fish sauce) and steamed white rice.

The following is what it looks like. http://yireservation.com/recipes/char-siu-chinese-bbq-pork/

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/char-siu-chinese-bbq-pork/

http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/19078/chinese+barbecue+porkhttp://thestonesoup.com/blog/how-to-make-authentic-bbq-chinese-pork-at-home/http://www.gourmettraveller.com.au/recipes/recipe-search/masterclass/2011/12/char-siu/
Categories: thinktime

Binh Nguyen: Korean/Japanese Pork Bolgogi (BBQ Pork) Recipe

Planet Linux Australia - Thu 26th Feb 2015 22:02
This is based on recipes online and an interpretation by a korean/japanese fusion restaurant that I used to frequent. While there are other alternative recipe that possibly taste better, I find that this is the quickest and easiest version. - pork (purchase offcuts/pre-sliced pork belly in some stores for a more timely meal)

- bolgogi sauce

- sugar

- mirin or rice cooking wine

- crushed/diced garlic or powder

- soy sauce

- ginger (optional)

- pepper (optional)

- spring onion (optional)

- shichimi togarashi spice mix

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shichimi



Slice pork if required. Coat pork with bicarbonate soda if desired (meat tenderiser) and then wash off in cold water. Create marinade sauce by starting with bolgogi sauce and then adding sugar, soy sauce, garlic, ginger, shichimi togarashi spice mix, etc... Marinade pork with sauce. Cook rice in meantime. Pan fry pork and then place under grill for quicker results or else place directly in grill/oven/bbq from start to finish.

Serve with Miso soup, sweet potato fries, and rice. Garnish pork with shichimi togarashi spice mix and rice with soy sauce. Add kimchi to meal if desired.



You can change the meat to chicken or even beef if the sauce is changed to the appropiate one.



The following is what it looks like.

http://zenkimchi.com/featured/recipe-dwaeji-bulgogi-grilled-korean-spicy-pork/

http://crazykoreancooking.com/recipe/spicy-pork-bulgogi-spicy-marinated-pork
Categories: thinktime

Binh Nguyen: Simple Pasta Recipes

Planet Linux Australia - Thu 26th Feb 2015 21:02
As the title states the following are a bunch of recipes that I sometimes use for pasta. This is being placed here for my own possible records and for others to use if so desired.

The point of these recipes is to achieve the best taste, in the quicket possible time, at the cheapest possible price. That's why the ingredients are somewhat non-traditional at times. Here's the other thing, it's obvious that they can be altered quickly and easily to suit other core ingredients. Don't be afraid to experiment.

Bacon and Mushroom Carbonara with Pasta

- white pasta sauce (can be any. We will modify to suit our tastes but most are roughly the same. Alfredo is often the easiest/closest to what we finally want though)

- mushrooms (buy them pre-sliced and you'll have the sauce done for this recipe done in no time)

- bacon (buy it pre-diced and you'll have the sauce done for this recipe done in no time)

- sugar (to taste)

- salt (to taste)- soy sauce (to taste)

- pepper (to taste)Fry off bacon then mushroom in a pan. Add pasta sauce. In the meantime, cook pasta with some salted water. Use sugar/salt/soy sauce to change sauce if too tart, sweet, etc... Garnish pasta and sauce with parmessan if desired.

Spaghetti Bolognese with Pasta

- pasatta or tomato based pasta sauce

- beef mince- onion (optional)

- garlic (optional)

- fresh chilli or chilli flakes (to taste)- salt (to taste)

- sugar (to taste)

- soy sauce (to taste)  - pepper (to taste)- tomato sauce (to taste) Sautee onion, garlic, and chilli. Brown mince (remove excess liquid if desired. It will change the nature of the sauce if there is excess liquid). Add pasta sauce. In the meantime, cook pasta with some salted water. Use sugar/salt/pepper/soy sauce to change sauce if too tart, sweet, etc... Garnish pasta and sauce with parmessan if desired.



Spaghetti Bolognese (Asian Interpretation) with Pasta

- pasatta

- sliced beef

- onion (optional)

- garlic (optional)

- fresh chilli, sriracha chilli sauce, or chilli flakes (to taste)- salt (to taste)

- sugar (to taste)

- soy sauce (to taste) 

- fish sauce (to taste)  - pepper (to taste)Sautee onion, garlic, and chilli. Brown mince (remove excess liquid if desired. It will change the nature of the sauce if there is excess liquid). Add pasta sauce. In the meantime, cook pasta with some salted water. Use sugar/salt/pepper/sriracha chilli sauce/soy sauce to change sauce if too tart, sweet, etc... Garnish pasta and sauce with parmessan if desired.



Seafood or Chill Prawn Tomato Sauce with Pasta

- pasatta or tomato based pasta sauce

- prawns or seafood

- onion (optional)

- garlic (optional)

- fresh chilli or chilli flakes (to taste)- sriracha chilli sauce, sambal oelek, or chilli bean paste (to taste) - salt (to taste)

- sugar (to taste)

- soy sauce (to taste) 

- pepper (to taste)- tomato sauce (to taste)

- diced fresh tomato (optional)(buy pre-diced canned if pressed for time)

- olives (optional)(buy canned, pre-sliced, and drain holding liquid if pressed for time)Sautee onion, garlic, and chilli. Sear seafood (remove excess liquid if desired. It will change the nature of the sauce if there is excess liquid). Add pasta sauce, and fresh tomato and olives (if desired). In the meantime, cook pasta with some salted water. Use sugar/salt/pepper/sriracha chilli sauce/soy sauce to change sauce if too tart, sweet, etc... Garnish pasta and sauce with parmessan if desired.



Pork Chops With White Sauce with Pasta- pork chops

- cream- tomato sauce- garlic - salt (to taste)

- sugar (to taste)

- soy sauce (to taste) 

- pepper (to taste)- tomato sauce (to taste) Sautee onion, garlic, and chilli. Sear pork chop to level desired (remove excess liquid if desired. It will change the nature of the sauce if there is excess liquid) and remove from pan. Add cream to deglaze pan and create sauce. In the meantime, cook pasta with some salted water. Use sugar/salt/pepper/tomato sauce/soy sauce to change sauce if too tart, sweet, etc... Garnish pasta and sauce with parmessan if desired.

Categories: thinktime

The indirect investment (plural)

Seth Godin - Thu 26th Feb 2015 21:02
The investor asks, "when do I get paid back?" The work for hire asks, "what's in it for me?" The member of the community wonders, "what's in it for us?" Plural. More than ever, our research, our writing, our art...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Planet Linux Australia - Thu 26th Feb 2015 18:02

Another weird day really.

The headache from yesterday did not improve, after physio and tablets. I went to bed early and woke up around 2am with my head still banging.

Work has a construction site across the road and it’s still very noisy at times, it was very difficult dealing with both a headache throbbing inside my head and the builders machines throbbing the outside of my head.

I had lunch offsite with H, who is always doing a million and one things and making me feel lazy.

I decided I didn’t want to deal with the headache and noise in the afternoon and headed home.



Filed under: diary
Categories: thinktime

Michael Still: Tuggeranong Hill (again)

Planet Linux Australia - Thu 26th Feb 2015 11:02
I walked up Tuggeranong Hill again, this time as a geocaching run. This is the first trig I've visited twice!



   



Interactive map for this route.



Tags for this post: blog pictures 20150225-tuggeranong_hill photo canberra tuggeranong bushwalk trig_point

Related posts: Big Monks; A walk around Mount Stranger; Forster trig; Two trigs and a first attempt at finding Westlake; Taylor Trig; Oakey trig



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Categories: thinktime

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