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A dollar more (vs. a dollar less)

Seth Godin - Wed 29th Jun 2016 18:06
Consider a race to the top. How can Lyft possibly compete with Uber? Scale is often the secret to a commodity business, and if Lyft races to be ever cheaper than Uber, the only possible outcome doesn’t look good. It's...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

The Foundation of Technical Leadership

a list apart - Wed 29th Jun 2016 00:06

I’m a front-end architect, but I’m also known as a technical leader, subject matter expert, and a number of other things. I came into my current agency with five years of design and development management experience; yet when it came time to choose a path for my career with the company, I went the technical route.

I have to confess I had no idea what a technical leader really does. I figured it out, eventually.

Technical experts are not necessarily technical leaders. Both have outstanding technical skills; the difference is in how others relate to you. Are you a person that others want to follow? That’s the question that really matters. Here are some of the soft skills that set a technical leader apart from a technical expert.

Help like it’s your job

Your authority in a technical leadership position—or any leadership position—is going to arise from what you can do for (or to) other people. Healthy authority here stems from you being known as a tried-and-true problem-solver for everyone. The goal is for other people to seek you out, not for you to be chasing down people for code reviews. For this to happen, intelligence and skill are not enough—you need to make a point of being helpful.

For the technical leader, if you’re too busy to help, you’re not doing your job—and I don’t just mean help someone when they come by and ask for help. You may have to set an expectation with your supervisor that helping others is a vital part of a technical leader’s job. But guess what? It might be billable time—check with your boss. Even if it’s not, try to estimate how much time it’s saving your coworkers. Numbers speak volumes.

The true measure of how helpful you are is the technical know-how of the entire team. If you’re awesome but your team can’t produce excellent work, you’re not a technical leader—you’re a high-level developer. There is a difference. Every bit of code you write, every bit of documentation you put together should be suitable to use as training for others on your team. When making a decision about how to solve a problem or what technologies to use, think about what will help future developers.

My job as front-end architect frequently involves not only writing clean code, but cleaning up others’ code to aid in reusability and comprehension by other developers. That large collection of functions might work better as an object, and it’ll probably be up to you to make that happen, whether through training or just doing it.

Speaking of training, it needs to be a passion. Experience with and aptitude for training were probably the biggest factors in me landing the position as front-end architect. Public speaking is a must. Writing documentation will probably fall on you. Every technical problem that comes your way should be viewed as an opportunity to train the person who brought it to you.

Helping others, whether they’re other developers, project managers, or clients, needs to become a passion for you if you’re an aspiring technical leader. This can take a lot of forms, but it should permeate into everything you do. That’s why this is rule number one.

Don’t throw a mattress into a swimming pool

An infamous prank can teach us something about being a technical leader. Mattresses are easy to get into swimming pools; but once they’re in there, they become almost impossible to get out. Really, I worked the math on this: a queen-sized mattress, once waterlogged, will weigh over 2000 pounds.

A lot of things are easy to work into a codebase: frameworks, underlying code philosophies, even choices on what technology to use. But once a codebase is built on a foundation, it becomes nearly impossible to get that foundation out of there without rebuilding the entire codebase.

Shiny new framework seem like a good idea? You’d better hope everyone on your team knows how to use that framework, and that the framework’s around in six months. Don’t have time to go back and clean up that complex object you wrote to handle all the AJAX functionality? Don’t be surprised when people start writing unneeded workarounds because they don’t understand your code. Did you leave your code in a state that’s hard to read and modify? I want you to imagine a mattress being thrown into a swimming pool…

Failure to heed this command frequently results in you being the only person who can work on a particular project. That is never a good situation to be in.

Here is one of the big differences between a technical expert and a technical leader: a technical expert could easily overlook that consideration. A technical leader would take steps to ensure that it never happens.

As a technical expert, you’re an A player, and that expertise is needed everywhere; and as a technical leader, it’s your job to make sure you can supply it, whether that means training other developers, writing and documenting code to get other developers up to speed, or intentionally choosing frameworks and methodologies your team is already familiar with.

Jerry Weinberg, in The Psychology of Computer Programming, said, “If a programmer is indispensable, get rid of him as quickly as possible!” If you’re in a position where you’re indispensable to a long-term project, fixing that needs to be a top priority. You should never be tied down to one project, because your expertise is needed across the team.

Before building a codebase on anything, ask yourself what happens when you’re no longer working on the project. If the answer is they have to hire someone smarter than you or the project falls apart, don’t include it in the project.

And as a leader, you should be watching others to make sure they don’t make the same mistake. Remember, technology decisions usually fall on the technical leader, no matter who makes them.

You’re not the only expert in the room

“Because the new program is written for OS 8 and can function twice as fast. Is that enough of a reason, Nancy Drew?”

That’s the opening line of Nick Burns, Your Company’s Computer Guy, from the Saturday Night Live sketch with the same name. He’s a technical expert who shows up, verbally abuses you, fixes your computer, and then insults you some more before shouting, “Uh, you’re welcome!” It’s one of those funny-because-it’s-true things.

The stereotype of the tech expert who treats everyone else as inferiors is so prevalent that it’s worked its way into comedy skits, television shows, and watercooler conversations in businesses across the nation.

I’ve dealt with the guy (or gal). We all have. You know the guy, the one who won’t admit fault, who gets extremely defensive whenever others suggest their own ideas, who views his intellect as superior to others and lets others know it. In fact, everyone who works with developers has dealt with this person at some point.

It takes a lot more courage and self-awareness to admit that I’ve been that guy on more than one occasion. As a smart guy, I’ve built my self esteem on that intellect. So when my ideas are challenged, when my intellect is called into question, it feels like a direct assault on my self esteem. And it’s even worse when it’s someone less knowledgeable than me. How dare they question my knowledge! Don’t they know that I’m the technical expert?

Instead of viewing teammates as people who know less than you, try to view them as people who know more than you in different areas. Treat others as experts in other fields that you can learn from. That project manager may not know much about your object-oriented approach to the solution, but she’s probably an expert in how the project is going and how the client is feeling about things.

Once again, in The Psychology of Computer Programming, Weinberg said, “Treat people who know less than you with respect, deference, and patience.” Take it a step further. Don’t just treat them that way—think of them that way. You’d be amazed how much easier it is to work with equals rather than intellectually inferior minions—and a change in mindset might be all that’s required to make that difference.

Intelligence requires clarity

It can be tempting to protect our expertise by making things appear more complicated than they are. But in reality, it doesn’t take a lot of intelligence to make something more complicated than it needs to be. It does, however, take a great deal of intelligence to take something complicated and make it easy to understand.

If other developers, and non-technical people, can’t understand your solution when you explain it in basic terms, you’ve got a problem. Please don’t hear that as “All good solutions should be simple,” because that’s not the case at all—but your explanations should be. Learn to think like a non-technical person so you can explain things in their terms. This will make you much more valuable as a technical leader.

And don’t take for granted that you’ll be around to explain your solutions. Sometimes, you’ll never see the person implementing your solution, but that email you sent three weeks ago will be. Work on your writing skills. Pick up a copy of Steven Pinker’s The Sense of Style and read up on persuasive writing. Start a blog and write a few articles on what your coding philosophies are.

The same principle extends to your code. If code is really hard to read, it’s usually not a sign that a really smart person wrote it; in fact, it usually means the opposite. Speaker and software engineer Martin Fowler once said, “Any fool can write code that a computer can understand. Good programmers write code that humans can understand.”

Remember: clarity is key. The perception of your intelligence is going to define the reality of your work experience, whether you like it or not.

You set the tone

Imagine going to the doctor to explain some weird symptoms you’re having. You sit down on the examination bed, a bit nervous and a bit confused as to what’s actually going on. As you explain your condition, the doctor listens with widening eyes and shaking hands. And the more you explain, the worse it gets. This doctor is freaking out. When you finally finish, the doctor stammers, “I don’t know how to handle that!”

How would you feel? What would you do? If it were me, I’d start saying goodbye to loved ones, because that’s a bad, bad sign. I’d be in a full-blown panic based on the doctor’s reaction.

Now imagine a project manager comes to you and starts explaining the weird functionality needed for a particularly tricky project. As you listen, it becomes clear that this is completely new territory for you, as well as for the company. You’re not even sure if what they’re asking is possible.

How do you respond? Are you going to be the crazy doctor above? If you are, I can assure you the project manager will be just as scared as you are, if not more so.

I’m not saying you should lie and make something up, because that’s even worse. But learning to say “I don’t know” without a hint of panic in your voice is an art that will calm down project teams, clients, supervisors, and anyone else involved in a project. (Hint: it usually involves immediately following up with, “but I’ll check it out.”)

As a technical leader, people will follow your emotional lead as well as your technical lead. They’ll look to you not only for the answers, but for the appropriate level of concern. If people leave meetings with you more worried than they were before, it’s probably time to take a look at how your reactions are influencing them.

Real technical leadership

Technical leadership is just as people-centric as other types of leadership, and knowing how your actions impact others can make all the difference in the world in moving from technical expert to technical leader. Remember: getting people to follow your lead can be even more important than knowing how to solve technical problems. Ignoring people can be career suicide for a technical leader—influencing them is where magic really happens.

 

Categories: thinktime

The benefit of the doubt

Seth Godin - Tue 28th Jun 2016 18:06
Doubt is corrosive. Someone faced with doubt rarely brings her best self to the table. Doubt undermines confidence, it casts aspersions, it assumes untruths. Yes, of course you need to qualify your leads. And yes, we know that you need...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Don't tug on capes, share them

Seth Godin - Mon 27th Jun 2016 20:06
Shannon Weber decided that there wasn't enough love, recognition or connection in her world, so she did something about it. When she finds an unsung (don't say 'ordinary' hero) she makes them a cape. Caping people, catching them doing something...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

This week's sponsor: Skillshare

a list apart - Mon 27th Jun 2016 15:06

​SKILLSHARE. Explore 1000’s of online classes in design, business, and more! Get 3 months of unlimited access for $0.99.

Categories: thinktime

Uninformed dissent

Seth Godin - Sun 26th Jun 2016 20:06
"I'm not sure what it is, but I'm against it." It's a mistake to believe that people know all the facts before they decide. In fact, most of the time, we decide and then figure out if we need to...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Not enough 'if' or not enough 'then'?

Seth Godin - Sat 25th Jun 2016 18:06
All change involves an if/then promise. "If you want a delicious dinner, then try this new restaurant." "If you want to be seen as a hunk, drive this Ferrari." "If you want to avoid being dead, have this surgery." If...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

The problem with complaining about the system

Seth Godin - Fri 24th Jun 2016 18:06
...is that the system can't hear you. Only people can. And the problem is that people in the system are too often swayed to believe that they have no power over the system, that they are merely victims of it,...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Taking notes vs. taking belief

Seth Godin - Thu 23rd Jun 2016 18:06
Is there anything easier than listening to a lecture or reading a book and taking notes? And is there anything more difficult than setting aside our preconceptions and the resistance and acting 'as if', being open to belief, at least...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Bigger for?

Seth Godin - Wed 22nd Jun 2016 18:06
Is bigger better for the investor or is it better for the customer? At a huge hotel in Nashville (more than 1,000 rooms), there's always a long line at the check in desk, the gym is full at 5 in...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

The Future of the Web

a list apart - Wed 22nd Jun 2016 00:06

Recently the web—via Twitter—erupted in short-form statements that soon made it clear that buttons had been pushed, sides taken, and feelings felt. How many feels? All the feels. Some rash words may have been said.

But that’s Twitter for you.

It began somewhat innocuously off-Twitter, with a very reasonable X-Men-themed post by Brian Kardell (one of the authors of the Extensible Web Manifesto). Brian suggests that the way forward is by opening up (via JavaScript) some low-level features that have traditionally been welded shut in the browser. This gives web developers and designers—authors, in the parlance of web standards—the ability to prototype future native browser features (for example, by creating custom elements).

If you’ve been following all the talk about web components and the shadow DOM of late, this will sound familiar. The idea is to make standards-making a more rapid, iterative, bottom-up process; if authors have the tools to prototype their own solutions or features (poly- and prolly-fills), then the best of these solutions will ultimately rise to the top and make their way into the native browser environments.

This sounds empowering, collaborative—very much in the spirit of the web.

And, in fact, everything seemed well on the World Wide Web until this string of tweets by Alex Russell, and then this other string of tweets. At which point everyone on the web sort of went bananas.

Doomsday scenarios were proclaimed; shadowy plots implied; curt, sweeping ideological statements made. In short, it was the kind of shit-show you might expect from a touchy, nuanced subject being introduced on Twitter.

But why is it even touchy? Doesn’t it just sound kind of great?

Oh wait JavaScript

Whenever you talk about JavaScript as anything other than an optional interaction layer, folks seem to gather into two big groups.

On the Extensible Web side, we can see the people who think JavaScript is the way forward for the web. And there’s some historical precedent for that. When Brendan Eich created JavaScript, he was aware that he was putting it all together in a hurry, and that he would get things wrong. He wanted JavaScript to be the escape hatch by which others could improve his work (and fix what he got wrong). Taken one step further, JavaScript gives us the ability to extend the web beyond where it currently is. And that, really, is what the Extensible Web Manifesto folks are looking to do.

The web needs to compete with native apps, they assert. And until we get what we need natively in the browser, we can fake it with JavaScript. Much of this approach is encapsulated in the idea of progressive web apps (offline access, tab access, file system access, a spot on the home screen)—giving the web, as Alex Russell puts it, a fair fight.

On the other side of things, in the progressive enhancement camp, we get folks that are worried these approaches will leave some users in the dust. This is epitomized by the “what about users with no JavaScript” argument. This polarizing question—though not the entire issue by far—gets at the heart of the disagreement.

For the Extensible Web folks, it feels like we’re holding the whole web back for a tiny minority of users. For the Progressive Enhancement folks, it’s akin to throwing out accessibility—cruelly denying access to a subset of (quite possibly disadvantaged) users.


During all this hubbub, Jeremy Keith, one of the most prominent torchbearers for progressive enhancement, reminded us that nothing is absolute. He suggests that—as always—the answer is “it depends.” Now this should be pretty obvious to anyone who’s spent a few minutes in the real world doing just about anything. And yet, at the drop of a tweet, we all seem to forget it.

So if we can all take a breath and rein in our feelings for a second, how might we better frame this whole concept of moving the web forward? Because from where I’m sitting, we’re all actually on the same side.

History and repetition

To better understand the bigger picture about the future of the web, it’s useful (as usual) to look back at its past. Since the very beginning of the web, there have been disagreements about how best to proceed. Marc Andreessen and Tim Berners-Lee famously disagreed about the IMG tag. Tim didn’t get his way, Marc implemented IMG in Mosaic as he saw fit, and we all know how things spun out from there. It wasn’t perfect, but a choice had to be made and it did the job. History suggests that IMG did its job fairly well.

A pattern of hacking our way to the better solution becomes evident when you follow the trajectory of the web’s development.

In the 1990’s, webmasters and designers wanted layout like they were used to in print. They wanted columns, dammit. David Siegel formalized the whole tables-and-spacer-GIFs approach in his wildly popular book Creating Killer Web Sites. And thus, the web was flooded with both design innovation and loads of un-semantic markup. Which we now know is bad. But those were the tools that were available, and they allowed us to express our needs at the time. Life, as they say…finds a way.

And when CSS layout came along, guess what it used as a model for the kinds of layout techniques we needed? That’s right: tables.

While we’re at it, how about Flash? As with tables, I’m imagining resounding “boos” from the audience. “Boo, Flash!” But if Flash was so terrible, why did we end up with a web full of Flash sites? I’ll tell you why: video, audio, animation, and cross-browser consistency.

In 1999? Damn straight I want a Flash site. Once authors got their hands on a tool that let them do all those incredible things, they brought the world of web design into a new era of innovation and experimentation.

But again with the lack of semantics, linkability, and interoperability. And while we were at it, with the tossing out of an open, copyright-free platform. Whoops.

It wasn’t long, though, before the native web had to sit up and take notice. Largely because of what authors expressed through Flash, we ended up with things like HTML5, Ajax, SVGs, and CSS3 animations. We knew the outcomes we wanted, and the web just needed to evolve to give us a better solution than Flash.

In short: to get where we need to go, we have to do it wrong first.

Making it up as we go along

We authors express our needs with the tools available to help model what we really need at that moment. Best practices and healthy debate are a part of that. But please, don’t let the sort of emotions we attach to politics and religion stop you from moving forward, however messily. Talk about it? Yes. But at a certain point we all need to shut our traps and go build some stuff. Build it the way you think it should be built. And if it’s good—really good—everyone will see your point.

If I said to you, “I want you to become a really great developer—but you’re not allowed to be a bad developer first,” you’d say I was crazy. So why would we say the same thing about building the web?

We need to try building things. Probably, at first, bad things. But the lessons learned while building those “bad” projects point the way to the better version that comes next. Together we can shuffle toward a better way, taking steps forward, back, and sometimes sideways. But history tells us that we do get there.

The web is a mess. It is, like its creators, imperfect. It’s the most human of mediums. And that messiness, that fluidly shifting imperfection, is why it’s survived this long. It makes it adaptable to our quickly-shifting times.

As we try to extend the web, we may move backward at the same time. And that’s OK. That imperfect sort of progress is how the web ever got anywhere at all. And it’s how it will get where we’re headed next.

Context is everything

One thing that needs to be considered when we’re experimenting (and building things that will likely be kind of bad) is who the audience is for that thing. Will everyone be able to use it? Not if it’s, say, a tool confined to a corporate intranet. Do we then need to worry about sub-3G network users? No, probably not. What about if we’re building on the open web but we’re building a product that is expressly for transferring or manipulating HD video files? Do we need to worry about slow networks then? The file sizes inherent in the product pretty much exclude slow networks already, so maybe that condition can go out the window there, too.

Context, as usual, is everything. There needs to be realistic assessment of the risk of exclusion against the potential gains of trying new technologies and approaches. We’re already doing this, anyway. Show me a perfectly progressively enhanced, perfectly accessible, perfectly performant project and I’ll show you a company that never ships. We do our best within the constraints we have. We weigh potential risks and benefits. And then we build stuff and assess how well it went; we learn and improve.

When a new approach we’re trying might have aspects that are harmful to some users, it’s good to raise a red flag. So when we see issues with one another’s approaches, let’s talk about how we can fix those problems without throwing out the progress that’s been made. Let’s see how we can bring greater experiences to the web without leaving users in the dust.

If we can continue to work together and consciously balance these dual impulses—pushing the boundaries of the web while keeping it open and accessible to everyone—we’ll know we’re on the right track, even if it’s sometimes a circuitous or befuddling one. Even if sometimes it’s kind of bad. Because that’s the only way I know to get to good.

Categories: thinktime

"So busy doing my job, I can't get any work done"

Seth Godin - Tue 21st Jun 2016 18:06
Your job is an historical artifact. It's a list of tasks, procedures, alliances, responsibilities, to-dos, meetings (mostly meetings) that were layered in, one at a time, day after day, for years. And your job is a great place to hide....        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

You can't ask customers want they want

Seth Godin - Mon 20th Jun 2016 18:06
... not if your goal is to find a breakthrough. Because your customers have trouble imagining a breakthrough. You ought to know what their problems are, what they believe, what stories they tell themselves. But it rarely pays to ask...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

The saying/doing gap

Seth Godin - Sun 19th Jun 2016 19:06
At first, it seems as though the things you declare, espouse and promise matter a lot. And they do. For a while. But in the end, we will judge you on what you do. When the gap between what you...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

"The way we do things"

Seth Godin - Sat 18th Jun 2016 18:06
There are two pitfalls you can encounter in dealing with focus and process: In moments of weakness, you take on a project or client that's outside your focus zone. After all, you need the work. In moments of blindness, you...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Help One of Our Own: Carolyn Wood

a list apart - Sat 18th Jun 2016 02:06

One of the nicest people we’ve ever known and worked with is in a desperate fight to survive. Many of you remember her—she is a gifted, passionate, and tireless worker who has never sought the spotlight and has never asked anything for herself.

Carolyn Wood spent three brilliant years at A List Apart, creating the position of acquisitions editor and bringing in articles that most of us in the web industry consider essential reading—not to mention more than 100 others that are equally vital to what we do today. Writers loved her. Since 1999, she has also worked on great web projects like DigitalWeb, The Manual, and Codex: The Journal of Typography.

Think about it. What would the web look like if she hadn’t been a force behind articles like these:

Three years ago, Carolyn was confined to a wheelchair. Then it got worse. From the YouCaring page:

This April, after a week-long illness, she developed acute injuries to the tendons in her feet and the nerves in her right hand and arm. She couldn’t get out of her wheelchair, even to go to the bathroom. At the hospital, they discovered Carolyn had acute kidney failure. After a month in a hospital and a care facility she has bounced back from the kidney failure, but she cannot take painkillers to help her hands and feet.

Carolyn cannot stand or walk or dress herself or take a shower. She is dependent on a lift, manned by two people, to transfer her. Without it she cannot leave her bed.

She’s now warehoused in a home that does not provide therapy—and her insurance does not cover the cost. Her bills are skyrocketing. (She even pays rent on her bed for $200 a month!)

Perhaps worst of all—yes, this gets worse—is that her husband has leukemia. He’s dealing with his own intense pain and fatigue and side effects from twice-monthly infusions. They are each other’s only support, and have been living apart since April. They have no income other than his disability, and are burning through their life savings.

This is absolutely a crisis situation. We’re pulling the community together to help Carolyn—doing anything we possibly can. Her bills are truly staggering. She has no way to cover basic life expenses, much less raise the huge sums required to get the physical and occupational therapy she needs to be independent again.

Please help by donating anything you can, and by sharing Carolyn’s support page with anyone in your network who is compassionate and will listen.

 

Categories: thinktime

Stretching without support

Seth Godin - Fri 17th Jun 2016 18:06
One of the fundamental equations of our self-narrative is: If I only had more support, I could accomplish even more. Part of this is true. With more education, a stronger foundation, better cultural expectations, each of us is likely to...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

This week's sponsor: Bitbucket

a list apart - Fri 17th Jun 2016 00:06

BITBUCKET: Over 450,000 teams and 3 million developers love Bitbucket - it’s built for teams! Try it free.

Categories: thinktime

The ruby slippers problem

Seth Godin - Thu 16th Jun 2016 18:06
Most of what we're chasing is that which we've had all along. In our culture, the getting is ever more important than the having. There's nothing wrong with getting, of course, as long as the process is in sync with...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

It's not a race

Seth Godin - Wed 15th Jun 2016 19:06
Some things are races, but not many. A race is a competition in which the point is to win. You're not supposed to enjoy the ride, learn anything or make your community better. You're supposed to win. At the end...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

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