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Once Upon a Time

a list apart - 6 hours 38 min ago

Once upon a time, I had a coworker named Bob who, when he needed help, would start the conversation in the middle and work to both ends. My phone would ring, and the first thing I heard was: “Hey, so, we need the spreadsheets on Tuesday so that Information Security can have them back to us in time for the estimates.”

Spreadsheets? Estimates? Bob and I had never discussed either. As I had been “discouraged” from responding with “What the hell are you talking about now?” I spent the next 10 minutes of every Bob call trying to tease out the context of his proclamations.

Clearly, Bob needed help—and not just with spreadsheets.

Then there was Susan. When Susan wanted help, she gave me the entire life story of a project in the most polite, professional language possible. An email from Susan might go like this:

Good morning,

I’m working on the Super Bananas project, which we started three weeks ago and have been slowly working on since. We began with persona writing, then did some scenarios, and discussed a survey.

[Insert two more paragraphs of the history of the project]

I’m hoping—if you have the opportunity (due to your previous experience with [insert four of my last projects in chronological order])—you may be able to share a content-inventory template that would be appropriate for this project. If it isn’t too much trouble, when you get a chance, could you forward me the template at your earliest convenience?

Thank you in advance for your cooperation,

Susan

An email that said, “Hey do you have a content-inventory template I could use on the Super Bananas Project?” would have sufficed, but Susan wanted to be professional. She believed that if I had to ask a question, she had failed to communicate properly. And, of course, that failure would weigh heavy on all our heads.

Bob and Susan were as opposite as the tortoise and the hare, but they shared a common problem. Neither could get over the river and through the woods effectively. Specifically, they were both lousy at establishing context and getting to the point.

We all need the help of others to build effective tools and applications. Communication skills are so critical to that endeavor that we’ve seen article after article after article—not to mention books, training classes, and job postings—stressing the importance of communication skills. Without the ability to communicate, we can neither build things right, nor build the right things, for our clients and our users.

Still, context-setting is a tricky skill to learn. Stray too far toward Bob, and no one knows what we’re talking about. Follow Susan’s example, and people get bored and wander off before we get to the point.

Whether we’re asking a colleague for help or nudging an end user to take action, we want them to respond a certain way. And whether we’re writing a radio ad, publishing a blog post, writing an email, or calling a colleague, we have to set the proper level of context to get the result we want.

The most effective technique I’ve found for beginners is a process I call “Once Upon a Time.”

Fairy tales? Seriously?

Fairy tales are one of our oldest forms of folklore, with evidence indicating that they may stretch back to the Roman Empire. The prelude “Once upon a time” dates to 1380 BCE, according to the Oxford English Dictionary. Wikipedia lists over 75 language variations of the stock story opener. It’s safe to say that the vast majority of us, regardless of language or culture, have heard our share of fairy tales, from the 1800s-era Brothers Grimm stories to the 1987 musical Into the Woods.

We know how they go:

Once upon a time, there was a [main character] living in [this situation] who [had this problem]. [Some person] knows of this need and sends the [main character] out to [complete these steps]. They [do things] but it’s really hard because [insert challenges]. They overcome [list of challenges], and everyone lives happily ever after.

Fairy tales are effective oral storytelling techniques precisely because they follow a standard structure that always provides enough context to understand the story. Almost everything we do can be described with this structure.

Once upon a time Anne lacked an ice cream sandwich. This forced her to get off the couch and go to the freezer, where food stayed amazingly cold. She was forced to put her hands in the icy freezer to dig the ice cream sandwich box out of the back. She overcame the cold and was rewarded with a tasty ice cream sandwich! And they all lived happily ever after.

The structure of a fairy tale’s beginning has a lot of similarities to the journalistic Five Ws of basic information gathering: Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?

In our communication construct, we are the main character whose situation and problem need to be succinctly described. We’ve been sent out to do a thing, we’ve hit a challenge, and now we need specific help to overcome the challenge.

How does this help me if I’m a Bob or a Susan?

When Bob wanted to tell his story, he didn’t start with “Once upon a time…” He started halfway through the story. If Bob was Little Red Riding Hood, he would have started by saying, “We need scissors and some rocks.” (Side note: the general lack of knowledge about how surgery works in that particular tale gives me chills.)

When Susan wanted to tell her story, she started before “Once upon a time…” If she was Little Red Riding Hood, she started by telling you how her parents met, how long they dated, and so on, before finally getting around to mentioning that she was trapped in a wolf’s stomach.

When we tell our stories, we have to start at the beginning—not too early, not too late. If we’re Bob, that means making sure we’ve relayed the basic facts: who we are, what our goal is, possibly who sent us, and what our challenge is. If we’re Susan, we need to make sure we limit ourselves to the facts we actually need.

This is where we take the fairy-tale format and put it into the first person. Susan might write:

Once upon a time, the Bananas team asked me to do the content strategy for their project. We made good progress until we had this problem: we don’t have a template for content inventories. Bob suggested I contact you. Do you have a template you can send us?

Bob might say:

Once upon a time, you and I were working on the data mapping of the new Information Security application. Then Information Security asked us to send the mapping to them so they could validate it. This is a problem because we only have until Tuesday to give them the unfinished spreadsheets. Otherwise we’ll hit an even bigger problem: we won’t be able to estimate the project size on Friday without the spreadsheet. Can you help me get the spreadsheet to them on time?

Notice the parallels between the fairy tales and these drafts: we know the main character, their situation, who sent them or triggered their move, and what they need to solve their problem. In Bob’s case, this is much more information than he usually provides. In Susan’s, it’s probably much less. In both cases, we’ve distilled the situation and the request down to the basics. In both cases, the only edit needed is to remove “Once upon a time…” from the first sentence, and it’s ready to go.

But what about…?

Both the Bobs and the Susans I’ve worked with have had questions about this technique, especially since in both cases they thought they were already doing a pretty good job of providing context.

The original Susan had two big concerns that led her to giving out too much information. The first was that she’d sound unprofessional if she didn’t include every last detail and nuance of business etiquette. The second was that if her recipient had questions, they’d consider her amateurish for not providing every bit of information up front.

Susans of the world, let me assure you: clear, concise communication is professional. The message isn’t not to use “please” and “thank you”; it’s that “If it isn’t too much trouble, when you get a chance, could you please consider…” is probably overkill.

Beyond that, no one can anticipate every question another person might have. Clear communication starts a dialogue by covering the basics and inviting questions. It also saves time; you only have to answer the questions your colleague or reader actually have. If you’re not sure whether to keep a piece of information in your story, take it out and see if the tale still makes sense.

Bob was a tougher nut to crack, in part because he frequently didn’t realize he was starting in the middle. Bob was genuinely baffled that colleagues hadn’t read his mind to know what he was talking about. He thought he just needed the answer to one “quick” question. Once he was made aware that he was confusing—and sometimes annoying—coworkers, he could be brought back on track with gentle suggestions. “Okay Bob, let’s start over. Once upon a time you were…?”

Begin at the beginning and stop at the end

Using the age-old format of “Once upon a time…” gives us an incredibly sturdy framework to use for requesting action from people. We provide all of the context they need to understand our request, as well as a clear and concise description of that request.

Clear, concise, contextual communication is professional, efficient, and much less frustrating to everyone involved, so it pays to build good habits, even if the basis of those habits seems a bit corny.

Do you really need to start with “Once upon a time…” to tell a story or communicate a request? Well, it doesn’t hurt. The phrase is really a marker that you’re changing the way you think about your writing, for whom you’re writing it, and what you expect to gain. Soup doesn’t require stones, and business communication doesn’t require “Once upon a time…”

But it does lead to more satisfying endings.

And they all lived happily ever after.

Categories: thinktime

Transitions

Seth Godin - Wed 25th May 2016 19:05
Coming and going matter far more than what happens in the middle. Opening things. Closing them. Tearing off the bandage. Losing something. Meeting someone new. Getting on the airplane, getting off of it. Being greeted. Elections. Ending a feud. We...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

There is more than one solution to your problem (and your problem is real)

Seth Godin - Tue 24th May 2016 19:05
Challenge one: Believing that the solution you've got (the person you want to hire, the strategy you want to implement, the decision you want to make) is the one and only way to make the problem go away or take...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Breakpoints

Seth Godin - Mon 23rd May 2016 19:05
A neighbor recently put in some new sidewalk. As usual, the workman interrupted the unbroken swath of perfect concrete with lines every three feet. What are the lines for? Well, the ground shifts. When it does, perfect concrete cracks in...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

More than ten is too many

Seth Godin - Sun 22nd May 2016 19:05
Human beings suffer from scope insensitivity. Time and again, we're unable to put more urgency or more value on choices that have more impact. We don't donate ten times as much to a charity that's serving 10 times (or even...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Metaphors aren't true

Seth Godin - Sat 21st May 2016 18:05
But they're useful. That's why professionals use them to teach, to learn and to understand. A metaphor takes what we know and uses it as a lever to understand something else. And the only way we can do that is...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

The other kind of harm

Seth Godin - Fri 20th May 2016 19:05
Pop culture is enamored with the Bond villian, the psycho, the truly evil character intent on destruction. It lets us off the hook, because it makes it easy to see that bad guys are other people. But most of the...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Our bias for paid marketing

Seth Godin - Thu 19th May 2016 18:05
A few rhetorical questions: Is a physical therapist with a professional logo better than one with a handmade sign? Are you more likely to stay at a hotel that you've heard of as opposed to an unknown one, even if...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

The short run and the long run

Seth Godin - Wed 18th May 2016 18:05
It's about scale. Pick a long enough one (or a short enough one) and you can see the edges. In the short run, there's never enough time. In the long run, constrained resources become available. In the short run, you...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

The Rich (Typefaces) Get Richer

a list apart - Wed 18th May 2016 00:05

There are over 1,200 font families available on Typekit. Anyone with a Typekit plan can freely use any of those typefaces, and yet we see the same small selection used absolutely everywhere on the web. Ever wonder why?

The same phenomenon happens with other font services like Google Fonts and MyFonts. Google Fonts offers 708 font families, but we can’t browse the web for 15 minutes without encountering Open Sans and Lato. MyFonts has over 20,000 families available as web fonts, yet designers consistently reach for only a narrow selection of those.

On my side project Typewolf, I curate daily examples of nice type in the wild. Here are the ten most popular fonts from 2015:

  1. Futura
  2. Aperçu
  3. Proxima Nova
  4. Gotham
  5. Brown
  6. Avenir
  7. Caslon
  8. Brandon Grotesque
  9. GT Walsheim
  10. Circular

And here are the ten most popular from 2014:

  1. Brandon Grotesque
  2. Futura
  3. Avenir
  4. Aperçu
  5. Proxima Nova
  6. Franklin Gothic
  7. GT Walsheim
  8. Gotham
  9. Circular
  10. Caslon

Notice any similarities? Nine out of the ten fonts from 2014 made the top ten again in 2015. Admittedly, Typewolf is a curated showcase, so there is bound to be some bias in the site selection process. But with 365 sites featured in a year, I think Typewolf is a solid representation of what is popular in the design community.

Other lists of popular fonts show similar results. Or simply look around the web and take a peek at the CSS—Proxima Nova, Futura, and Brandon Grotesque dominate sites today. And these fonts aren’t just a little more popular than other fonts—they are orders of magnitude more popular.

When it comes to typefaces, the rich get richer

I don’t mean to imply that type designers are getting rich like Fortune 500 CEOs and flying around to type conferences in their private Learjets (although some type designers are certainly doing quite well). I’m just pointing out that a tiny percentage of fonts get the lion’s share of usage and that these “chosen few” continue to become even more popular.

The rich get richer phenomenon (also known as the Matthew Effect) refers to something that grows in popularity due to a positive feedback loop. An app that reaches number one in the App Store will receive press because it is number one, which in turn will give it even more downloads and even more press. Popularity breeds popularity. For a cogent book that discusses this topic much more eloquently than I ever could, check out Nicholas Taleb’s The Black Swan.

But back to typefaces.

Designers tend to copy other designers. There’s nothing wrong with that—designers should certainly try to build upon the best practices of others. And they shouldn’t be culturally isolated and unaware of current trends. But designers also shouldn’t just mimic everything they see without putting thought into what they are doing. Unfortunately, I think this is what often happens with typeface selection.

How does a typeface first become popular, anyway?

I think it all begins with a forward-thinking designer who takes a chance on a new typeface. She uses it in a design that goes on to garner a lot of attention. Maybe it wins an award and is featured prominently in the design community. Another designer sees it and thinks, “Wow, I’ve never seen that typeface before—I should try using it for something.” From there it just cascades into more and more designers using this “new” typeface. But with each use, less and less thought goes into why they are choosing that particular typeface. In the end, it’s just copying.

Or, a typeface initially becomes popular simply from being in the right place at the right time. When you hear stories about famous YouTubers, there is one thing almost all of them have in common: they got in early. Before the market is saturated, there’s a much greater chance of standing out; your popularity is much more likely to snowball. A few of the most popular typefaces on the web, such as Proxima Nova and Brandon Grotesque, tell a similar story.

The typeface Gotham skyrocketed in popularity after its use in Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign. But although it gained enormous steam in the print world, it wasn’t available as a web font until 2013, when the company then known as Hoefler & Frere-Jones launched its subscription web font service. Proxima Nova, a typeface with a similar look, became available as a web font early, when Typekit launched in 2009. Proxima Nova is far from a Gotham knockoff—an early version, Proxima Sans, was developed before Gotham—but the two typefaces share a related, geometric aesthetic. Many corporate identities used Gotham, so when it came time to bring that identity to the web, Proxima Nova was the closest available option. This pushed Proxima Nova to the top of the bestseller charts, where it remains to this day.

Brandon Grotesque probably gained traction for similar reasons. It has quite a bit in common with Neutraface, a typeface that is ubiquitous in the offline world—walk into any bookstore and you’ll see it everywhere. Brandon Grotesque was available early on as a web font with simple licensing, whereas Neutraface was not. If you wanted an art-deco-inspired geometric sans serif with a small x-height for your website, Brandon Grotesque was the obvious choice. It beat Neutraface to market on the web and is now one of the most sought-after web fonts. Once a typeface reaches a certain level of popularity, it seems likely that a psychological phenomenon known as the availability heuristic kicks in. According to the availability heuristic, people place much more importance on things that they are easily able to recall. So if a certain typeface immediately comes to mind, then people assume it must be the best option.

For example, Proxima Nova is often thought of as incredibly readable for a sans serif due to its large x-height, low stroke contrast, open apertures, and large counters. And indeed, it works very well for setting body copy. However, there are many other sans serifs that fit that description—Avenir, FF Mark, Gibson, Texta, Averta, Museo Sans, Sofia, Lasiver, and Filson, to name a few. There’s nothing magical about Proxima Nova that makes it more readable than similar typefaces; it’s simply the first one that comes to mind for many designers, so they can’t help but assume it must be the best.

On top of that, the mere-exposure effect suggests that people tend to prefer things simply because they are more familiar with them—the more someone encounters Proxima Nova, the more appealing they tend to find it.

So if we are stuck in a positive feedback loop where popular fonts keep becoming even more popular, how do we break the cycle? There are a few things designers can do.

Strive to make your brand identifiable by just your body text

Even if it’s just something subtle, aim to make the type on your site unique in some way. If a reader can tell they are interacting with your brand solely by looking at the body of an article, then you are doing it right. This doesn’t mean that you should completely lose control and use type just for the sole purpose of standing out. Good type, some say, should be invisible. (Some say otherwise.) Show restraint and discernment. There are many small things you can do to make your type distinctive.

Besides going with a lesser-used typeface for your body text, you can try combining two typefaces (or perhaps three, if you’re feeling frisky) in a unique way. Headlines, dates, bylines, intros, subheads, captions, pull quotes, and block quotes all offer ample opportunity for experimentation. Try using heavier and lighter weights, italics and all-caps. Using color is another option. A subtle background color or a contrasting subhead color can go a long way in making your type memorable.

Don’t make your site look like a generic website template. Be a brand.

Dig deeper on Typekit

There are many other high-quality typefaces available on Typekit besides Proxima Nova and Brandon Grotesque. Spend some time browsing through their library and try experimenting with different options in your mockups. The free plan that comes with your Adobe Creative Cloud subscription gives you access to every single font in their library, so you have no excuse not to at least try to discover something that not everyone else is using.

A good tip is to start with a designer or foundry you like and then explore other typefaces in their catalog. For example, if you’re a fan of the popular slab serif Adelle from TypeTogether, simply click the name of their foundry and you’ll discover gems like Maiola and Karmina Sans. Don’t be afraid to try something that you haven’t seen used before.

Dig deeper on Google Fonts (but not too deep)

As of this writing, there are 708 font families available for free on Google Fonts. There are a few dozen or so really great choices. And then there are many, many more not-so-great choices that lack italics and additional weights and that are plagued by poor kerning. So, while you should be wary of digging too deep on Google Fonts, there are definitely some less frequently used options, such as Alegreya and Fira Sans, that can hold their own against any commercial font.

I fully support the open-source nature of Google Fonts and think that making good type accessible to the world for free is a noble mission. As time goes by, though, the good fonts available on Google Fonts will simply become the next Times New Romans and Arials—fonts that have become so overused that they feel like mindless defaults. So if you rely on Google Fonts, there will always be a limit to how unique and distinctive your brand can be.

Try another web font service such as Fonts.com, Cloud.typography or Webtype

It may have a great selection, but Typekit certainly doesn’t have everything. The Fonts.com library dwarfs the Typekit library, with over 40,000 fonts available. Hoefler & Co.’s high-quality collection of typefaces is only available through their Cloud.typography service. And Webtype offers selections not available on other services.

Self-host fonts from MyFonts, FontShop or Fontspring

Don’t be afraid to self-host web fonts. Serving fonts from your own website really isn’t that difficult and it’s still possible to have a fast-loading website if you self-host. I self-host fonts on Typewolf and my Google PageSpeed Insights scores are 90/100 for mobile and 97/100 for desktop—not bad for an image-heavy site.

MyFonts, FontShop, and Fontspring all offer self-hosting kits that are surprisingly easy to set up. Self-hosting also offers the added benefit of not having to rely on a third-party service that could potentially go down (and take your beautiful typography with it).

Explore indie foundries

Many small and/or independent foundries don’t make their fonts available through the major distributors, instead choosing to offer licensing directly through their own sites. In most cases, self-hosting is the only available option. But again, self-hosting isn’t difficult and most foundries will provide you with all the sample code you need to get up and running.

Here are some great places to start, in no particular order:

What about Massimo Vignelli?

Before I wrap this up, I think it’s worth briefly discussing famed designer Massimo Vignelli’s infamous handful-of-basic-typefaces advice (PDF). John Boardley of I Love Typography has written an excellent critique of Vignelli’s dogma. The main points are that humans have a constant desire for improvement and refinement; we will always need new typefaces, not just so that brands can differentiate themselves from competitors, but to meet the ever-shifting demands of new technologies. And a limited variety of type would create a very bland world.

No doubt there were those in the 16th century who shared Vignelli’s views. Every age is populated by those who think we’ve reached the apogee of progress… Vignelli’s beloved Helvetica, . . . would never have existed but for our desire to do better, to progress, to create. John Boardley, “The Vignelli Twelve” Are web fonts the best choice for every website?

Not necessarily. There are some instances where accessibility and site speed considerations may trump branding—in that case, it may be best just to go with system fonts. Georgia is still a pretty great typeface, and so are newer system UI fonts likes San Francisco, Roboto/Noto, and Segoe.

But if you’re working on a project where branding is important, don’t ignore the importance of type. We’re bombarded by more content now than at any other time in history; having a distinctive brand is more critical than ever.

90 percent of design is typography. And the other 90 percent is whitespace. Jeffrey Zeldman, “The Year in Design”

As designers, ask yourselves: “Is this truly the best typeface for my project? Or am I just using it to be safe, or out of laziness? Will it make my brand memorable, or will my site blend in with every other site out there?” The choice is yours. Dig deep, push your boundaries, and experiment. There are thousands of beautiful and functional typefaces out there—go use them!

Categories: thinktime

Identity vs. logic

Seth Godin - Tue 17th May 2016 19:05
Before we start laying out the logical argument for a course of action, it's worth considering whether a logical argument is what's needed. It may be that the person you're engaging with cares more about symbols, about tribal identity, about...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Using video well

Seth Godin - Mon 16th May 2016 20:05
The web was built on words. And words, of course, are available to anyone who can type. They're cheap, easy to edit and incredibly powerful when used well. Today's internet, though, is built on video. Much more difficult to create...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Actually, more data might not be what you're hoping for

Seth Godin - Sun 15th May 2016 18:05
They got us hooked on data. Advertisers want more data. Direct marketers want more data. Who saw it? Who clicked? What percentage? What's trending? What's yielding? But there's one group that doesn't need more data... Anyone who's making a long-term...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Amplifying social proof

Seth Godin - Sat 14th May 2016 18:05
Trust is the biggest hurdle. And trust largely comes from social proof. Is everyone doing this? Is it safe? Will I be embarrassed/ridiculed/left out/left behind/feel stupid? Social proof shares a word with social networks, but they're only loosely related. Social...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

The momentum myth

Seth Godin - Fri 13th May 2016 18:05
Roller coasters work because of momentum—the quantity of motion from the downhill allows the car to make it up the next rise. Without momentum, the car would merely stop. But few things in the world of ideas follow the same...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

The toddler strategy

Seth Godin - Thu 12th May 2016 19:05
Most people don't get too upset at anything a two-year-old kid says to them. That's because we don't believe that toddlers have a particularly good grasp on the nuances of the world, nor do they possess much in the way...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Striking a chord

Seth Godin - Wed 11th May 2016 19:05
Commonly misunderstood and misspelled as "striking a cord." A cord is a single strand that connects. You can strike a cord, but not much happens. A chord, on the other hand, is the resonance of multiple cords, more than one...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Hamish Taylor: A call to “standardised user account requirements” arms

Planet Linux Australia - Wed 11th May 2016 13:05

We need to have a standard for management of user accounts.

Given the number of high profile companies that have been cracked into lately, I have been going through the process of closing accounts for services I no longer use.

Many of these accounts were established when I was more trusting and included real data. However now, unless I am legally required to, I no longer use my real name or real data.

But I have been bitterly disappointed by the inability of some companies to shut down old accounts. For example, one service told me that “At this time, we do not directly delete user accounts…”. I also couldn’t change my username. Another service emailed my credentials in plain text.

To protect the privacy and security of all users, an enforceable standard needs to be established covering management of user accounts. It needs to be applied across the board to all systems connected to the internet. I know how ridiculous this sounds, and that many sites wouldn’t use it, but high profile services should be able to support something like this.

Included in the standard should be:

  • the ability to completely delete accounts (unless there’s some kind of legislative requirement to keep, and then they should only retain the data that is absolutely necessary)
  • the ability to change all details including usernames
  • a requirement to encrypt and salt the password (that covers the credentials in plain text issue noted above)
  • determine the minimum practicable data set that you need to maintain an account and only ask for that. If there’s no need to retain particular account details, don’t collect them. For example, I’ve never been contacted by phone by any of these companies so why was I forced to enter a phone number?

This is a short list from my frustrations today. Please comment to help me flesh this out with other things that should be done on a properly supported user account management system.

And please let me know of your experiences with companies that were unable to properly protect your privacy and security.

Categories: thinktime

Hamish Taylor: The woeful state of communications in Australia’s capital city

Planet Linux Australia - Wed 11th May 2016 13:05

For those who may not know, I recently moved from Melbourne, Victoria to Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (ACT) and am now living in a house in the inner north-west. Of course, being a geek, I wanted to get the internet connected as soon as possible! After such a smooth transition I’d expected some problems and this is where they all cropped up.

In Melbourne I had an Internode ADSL connection and before I moved I called them up to relocate this service. This, of course, relied on getting an active Telstra line at the new house. I knew it would take a bit of time to relocate the service, so in the interim I bought a Telstra wi-fi internet device. This is actually a ZTE MF30 and supports up to 5 connections via wi-fi, so I can get both my iPhone and laptop on at the same time. Quite simply, this device is brilliant at what it does and I couldn’t be happier with it.

So, at the moment I’m online via the Telstra device, which is just as well really, as I soon encounter communication issue number 1: Optus.

It appears that Optus have a woeful network in Canberra. I have an iPhone 3GS, which I know can only use 850MHz and 2100MHz 3G networks. Optus uses 900MHz and 2100MHz for their 3G, so the iPhone will only work in Optus 2100MHz coverage. In Melbourne I never had a problem getting on the internet at good speeds.

When I looked at the Optus overage maps for ACT and click on “3G Single band” (the 2100MHz network coverage), it shows the inner north-west being well covered. It really isn’t. Both from home and at work in Belconnen, I can barely get two bars of GSM phone signal. The connectivity is so bad that I can barely make phone calls and send SMSs. Occasionally, I get the “Searching…” message which tells me that it has completely lost GSM connectivity. This never happened in Melbourne, where I had 4-5 bars of signal pretty much all the time.

The 3G connection drops in and out so often that I have to be standing in exactly the right location to be able to access the internet on my iPhone. Even this afternoon in Kingston in the inner south, I wasn’t able to get onto the internet and post to Twitter. I had to use the Telstra device, which hasn’t missed a beat in any location for network connectivity, to establish a connection. This really isn’t good enough for the middle of Canberra. I am seriously considering calling Optus, lodging a complaint and trying to get out of my 2 year contract (which has another 10 months to run), so I can switch over to Telstra. I never thought I’d say this, but I actually want to use a Telstra service!!!

Communications issue number 2: TransACT. From what I can find out TransACT have a cable TV network which also has telephone and internet capabilities. When this network was established about a decade ago, it was revolutionary and competitive. Today the network has been expanded to support ADSL connections, but there is no ability to get a naked service as all connections require an active phone service. Additionally, as a quick look at some of the internet connectivity plans show, after factoring in the required phone service, it is a costly service for below average download allowances.

When I moved into the house, the process of relocating the Internode ADSL service from Melbourne to Canberra triggered a visit from a Telstra technician. However, he wasn’t able to find a physical Telstra line into the house. Being an older suburb of Canberra, this house will have a Telstra cable. Or rather will have had as apparently it is not unknown for TransACT installers to cut the Telstra cables out as “You won’t need THAT anymore!”

So now I have to pay for a new cable to be installed from the house to the “Telstra network boundary” (presumably the street or nearest light pole where it can be connected to Telstra’s infrastructure). Then we have to pay again for a new Telstra connection at a cost of $299. Considering that if the Telstra cable had been left in place, the connection cost would be $55, this is turning into quite an expensive proposition just to get a naked DSL service.

All in all I am not impressed with the state of communications in Australia’s capital city, Canberra. All I can say is please, please, please bring on the National Broadband Network (NBN)!

 

 

Categories: thinktime

Hamish Taylor: In an ideal world … how to change my address

Planet Linux Australia - Wed 11th May 2016 13:05

Recently I moved house.

I  hate moving. Not just for the having to pack everything into boxes at one end then then unpack everything at the destination (which for this move I didn’t have to do!), but mostly because I have to go through the pain that is changing my address.

It turns out that I interact with a lot of organisations, from finance institutions (banks, credit card companies, car insurance, house insurance, health insurance, etc), to official organisations (driver licencing, Medicare, electoral, organ donor register, etc), to community (Red Cross blood donor, 3RRRFM, etc) and mundane organisations (Costco, etc). And that’s just a fraction of them.

I was thinking that, rather than having to fill in what feels like a million forms and waste time that could be spent being a productive public servant or dad for my kid, why isn’t there a central contact details database that I update once? I’m sure that smarter minds than mine have considered this, but I think an opportunity exists for some organisation (government or private) to do this. In the day and age of ‘over-sharing’, are people still averse to putting their address, phone number and email details into a central database? Login security could be addressed using two-factor authentication, such as used by Google Authenticator, or sending a one-time code via SMS or email.

Many services, such as Twitter and Facebook, are set up to authorise other apps to access them. An example of this is when I used my Facebook account to sign up for Freecycle which operates as a Yahoo Group.  I ‘authorised’ Facebook to talk to Yahoo. I’ve also authorised Twicca on my Android smartphone to talk to my Twitter account.

In the same way, in this theoretical single contact details database, I could let the various companies and organisations that I interact with, access my updated contact details. Maybe they could poll this database once a week to look for updated details. I understand they’d have many different backend CRM systems so there may be some manipulation required, but nothing that’s too hard to fix with a bit of scripting.

I could also remove their access when I cease using their services. If I’m not longer banking with Bank A, then I revoke their access so they can’t find out how to contact me.

Does this sound sensible or silly? If sensible why hasn’t Google or someone done this already?

Categories: thinktime

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