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Looking for the trick

Seth Godin - Sat 24th Sep 2016 19:09
When you find a trick, a shortcut, a hack that gets you from here to there without a lot of sweat or risk, it's really quite rewarding. So much so that many successful people are hooked on the trick, always...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Skills vs. talents

Seth Godin - Fri 23rd Sep 2016 19:09
If you can learn it, it's a skill. If it's important, but innate, it's a talent. The thing is, almost everything that matters is a skill. If even one person is able to learn it, if even one person is...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

For the weekend...

Seth Godin - Fri 23rd Sep 2016 03:09
New podcast with Brian Koppelman Classic podcast with Krista Tippett Unmistakable Creative from 2015 And a video of Creative Mornings and their podcast The Your Turn book continues to spread. Have you seen it yet? Early-bird pricing on the huge...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Widespread confusion about what it takes to be strong

Seth Godin - Thu 22nd Sep 2016 18:09
Sometimes we confuse strength with: Loudness Brusqueness An inability to listen A resistance to seeing the world as it is An unwillingness to compromise small things to accomplish big ones Fast talking Bullying External unflappability Callousness Lying Policies instead of...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Big fish in a little pond

Seth Godin - Wed 21st Sep 2016 19:09
There's no doubt that the big fish gets respect, more attention and more than its fair share of business as a result. The hard part of being a big fish in a little pond isn't about being the right fish....        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Why We Should All Be Data Literate

a list apart - Wed 21st Sep 2016 00:09

Recently, I was lucky enough to see the great Jared Spool talk (spoiler: all Spool talks are great Spool talks). In this instance, the user interface icon warned of the perils of blindly letting data drive design.

I am in total agreement with 90 percent of his premise. Collecting and analyzing quantitative data can indeed inform your design decisions, and smart use of metrics can fix critical issues or simply improve the user experience. However, this doesn’t preclude a serious problem with data, or more specifically, with data users. Spool makes this clear: When you don’t understand what data can and can’t tell you and your work is being dictated by decisions based on that lack of understanding—well, your work and product might end up being rubbish. (Who hasn’t heard a manager fixate on some arbitrary metric, such as, “Jane, increase time on page” or “Get the bounce rate down, whatever it takes”?) Designing to blindly satisfy a number almost always leads to a poorer experience, a poorer product, and ultimately the company getting poorer.

Where Spool and I disagree is in his conclusion that all design teams need to include a data scientist. Or, better yet, that all designers should become data scientists. In a perfect world, that would be terrific. In the less-perfect world that most of us inhabit, I feel there’s a more viable way. Simply put: all designers can and should learn to be data literate. Come to think of it, it’d be nice if all citizens learned to be data literate, but that’s a different think piece.

For now, let’s walk through what data literacy is, how to go about getting it for less effort and cost than a certificate from Trump University, and how we can all build some healthy data habits that will serve our designs for the better.

What Data Literacy Is and Isn’t

Okay, data literacy is a broad term—unlike, say, “design.” In the education field, researchers juggle the terms “quantitative literacy,” “mathematical literacy,” and “quantitative reasoning,” but parsing out fine differences is beyond the scope of this article and, probably, your patience. To keep it simple, let’s think about data literacy as healthy skepticism or even bullshit detection. It’s the kind of skepticism you might adopt when faced with statements from politicians or advertisers. If a cookie box is splashed with a “20% more tasty!” banner, your rightful reaction might be “tastier than what, exactly, and who says?” Yes. Remember that response.

Data literacy does require—sorry, phobics—some math. But it’s not so bad. As a designer, you already use math: figuring pixels, or calculating the square footage of a space, or converting ems to percent and back. The basics of what you already do should give you a good handle on concepts like percentages, probability, scale, and change over time, all of which sometimes can hide the real meaning of a statistic or data set. But if you keep asking questions and know how multiplication and division work, you’ll be 92 percent of the way there. (If you’re wondering where I got that percentage from, well—I made it up. Congratulations, you’re already on the road to data literacy.)

Neil Lutsky writes about data literacy in terms of the “construction, communication, and evaluation of arguments.” Why is this relevant to you as a designer? As Spool notes, many design decisions are increasingly driven by data. Data literacy enables you to evaluate the arguments presented by managers, clients, and even analytics packages, as well as craft your own arguments. (After all, a key part of design is being able to explain why you made specific design decisions.) If someone emails you a spreadsheet and says, “These numbers say why this design has to be 5 percent more blue,” you need to be able to check the data and evaluate whether this is a good decision or just plain bonkers.

Yes, this is part of the job.

It’s So Easy

Look, journalists can get pretty good at being data literate. Not all journalists, of course, but there’s a high correlation between the ability to question data and the quality of the journalism—and it’s not high-level or arcane learning. One Poynter Institute data course was even taught (in slightly modified form) to grade schoolers. You’re a smart cookie, so you can do this. Not to mention the fact that data courses are often self-directed, online, and free (see “Resources” listed below).

Unlike data scientists who face complex questions, large data sets, and need to master concepts like regressions and Fourier transforms, you’re probably going to deal with less complex data. If you regularly need to map out complex edge-node relationships in a huge social graph or tackle big data, then yes, get that master’s degree in the subject or consult a pro. But if you’re up against Google Analytics? You can easily learn how to ask questions and look for answers. Seriously, ask questions and look for answers.

Designers need to be better at data literacy for many of the same reasons we need to work on technical literacy, as Sarah Doody explains. We need to understand what developers can and can’t do, and we need to understand what the data can and can’t do. For example, an A/B test of two different designs can tell you one thing about one thing, but if you don’t understand how data works, you probably didn’t set up the experiment conditions in a way that leads to informative results. (Pro tip: if you want to see how a change affects click-through, don’t test two designs where multiple items differ, and don’t expect the numbers to tell you why that happened.) Again: We need to question the data.

So we’ve defined a need, researched our users, and identified and defined a feature called data literacy. What remains is prototyping. Let’s get into it, shall we?

How to Build Data Literacy by Building Habits

Teaching data literacy is an ongoing topic of academic research and debate, so I’ll leave comprehensive course-building to more capable hands than mine. But together, we can cheaply and easily outline simple habits of critical thought and mathematical practice, and this will get us to, let’s say, 89 percent data literacy. At the least, you’ll be better able to evaluate which data could make your work better, which data should be questioned more thoroughly, and how to talk to metric-happy stakeholders or bosses. (Optional homework: this week, take one metric you track or have been told to track at work, walk through the habits below, and report back.)

Habit one: Check source and context

This is the least you should do when presented with a metric as a fait accompli, whether that metric is from a single study, a politician, or an analytics package.

First, ask about the source of the data (in journalism, this is reflex—“Did the study about the health benefits of smoking come from the National Tobacco Profiteering Association?”). Knowing the source, you can then investigate the second question.

The second question concerns how the data was collected, and what that can tell you—and what it can’t.  Let’s say your boss comes in with some numbers about time-on-page, saying “Some pages are more sticky than others. Let’s redesign the others to keep customers on all the other pages longer.” Should you jump to redesign the less-sticky pages, or is there a different problem at play?

It’s simple, and not undermining, to ask how time-on-page was measured and what it means. It could mean a number of things, things that that single metric will never reveal. Things that could be real problems, real advantages, or a combination of the two. Maybe the pages with higher time-on-page numbers simply took a lot longer to load, so potential customers were sitting there as a complex script or crappy CDN was slooooowly drawing things on the not-a-customer-any-more’s screen. Or it could mean some pages had more content. Or it could mean some were designed poorly and users had to figure out what to do next.

How can you find this out? How can you communicate that it’s important to find out? A quick talk with the dev team or running a few observations with real users could lead you to discover what the real problem is and how you can redesign to improve your product.

What you find out could be the difference between good and bad design. And that comes from knowing how a metric is measured, and what it doesn’t measure. The metric itself won’t tell you.

For your third question, ask the size of the sample. See how many users were hitting that site, whether the time-on-page stat was measured for all or some of these users, and whether that’s representative of the usual load. Your design fix could go in different directions depending on the answer. Maybe the metric was from just one user! This is a thing that sometimes happens.

Fourth, think and talk about context. Does this metric depend on something else? For example, might this metric change over time? Then you have to ask over what time period the metric was measured, if that period is sufficient, and whether the time of year when measured might make a difference.

Remember when I said change over time can be a red flag? Let’s say your boss is in a panic, perusing a chart that shows sales from one product page dropping precipitously last month. Design mandates flood your inbox: “We’ve got to promote this item more! Add some eye-catching design, promote it on our home page!”

What can you do to make the right design decisions? Pick a brighter blue for a starburst graphic on that product page?

Maybe it would be more useful to look at a calendar. Could the drop relate to something seasonal that should be expected? Jack o’lantern sales do tend to drop after November 1. Was there relevant news? Apple’s sales always drop before their annual events, as people expect new products to be announced. A plethora of common-sense questions could be asked.

The other key point about data literacy and change is that being data literate can immunize against common errors when looking at change over time. This gets to numeracy.

Habit two: Be numerate

I first learned about numeracy through John Allen Paulos’ book Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and its Consequences, though the term “innumeracy” was originated by Pulitzer Prize-winning scientist Douglas Hofstadter. Innumeracy is a parallel to illiteracy; it means the inability to reason with numbers. That is, the innumerate can do math but are more likely to trip up when mathematical reasoning is critical. This often happens when dealing with probability and coincidence, with statistics, and with things like percentages, averages, and changes. It’s not just you—these can be hard to sort out sort out! We’re presented with these metrics a lot, but usually given little time to think about them, so brushing up on that bit of math can really help put out (or avoid) a trash fire of bad design decisions.

Consider this:  A founder comes in with the news that an app has doubled its market base in the two weeks it’s been available. It’s literally gone up 100 percent in that time. That’s pretty awesome, right? Time to break out the bubbly, right? But what if you asked a few questions and found that this really meant the founder was the first user, then eventually her mom got onto it. That is literally doubling the user base exactly 100 percent.

Of course that’s obvious and simple. You see right off why this startup probably shouldn’t make the capital outlay to acquire a bottle or two juuuust yet. But exactly this kind of error gets overlooked easily and often when the math gets a bit more complex.

Any time you see a percentage, such as “23% more” or “we lost 17%,” don’t act until you’ve put on your math hat. You don’t even need to assume malice; this stuff simply gets confusing fast, and it’s part of your job not to misread the data and then make design decisions based on an erroneous understanding.

Here’s an example from Nicolas Kayser-Bril, who looks into the headline, “Risk of Multiple Sclerosis Doubles When Working at Night”:

“Take 1,000 Germans. A single one will develop MS over his lifetime. Now, if every one of these 1,000 Germans worked night shifts, the number of MS sufferers would jump to two. The additional risk of developing MS when working in shifts is one in 1,000, not 100%. Surely this information is more useful when pondering whether to take the job.”

This is a known issue in science journalism that isn’t discussed enough, and often leads to misleading headlines. Whenever there’s a number suggesting something that affects people, or a number suggesting change, look not just at the percentage but at what this would mean in the real world; do the math and see if the result matches the headline’s intimation. Also ask how the percentage was calculated. How was the sausage made? Lynn Arthur Steen explains how percentages presented to you may not just be the difference of two numbers divided by a number. Base lesson: always learn what your analytics application measures and how it calculates things. Four out of five dentists agree...so that’s, what, 80 percent true?

Averages are another potentially deceptive metric that simple math can help; sometimes it’s barely relevant, if at all. “The average length of a book purchased on Amazon is 234.23 pages” may not actually tell you anything. Sometimes you need to look into what’s being averaged. Given the example “One in every 15 Europeans is illiterate,” Kayser-Bril points out that maybe close to one in 15 Europeans is under the age of seven. It’s good advice to learn the terms “mode,” “median,” and “standard deviation.” (It doesn’t hurt (much), and can make you a more interesting conversationalist at dinner parties!)

Habit three: Check your biases

I know, that sounds horrible. But in this context, we’re talking about cognitive biases, which everyone has (this is why I encourage designers to study psychology, cognition studies, and sociology as much as they can). Though we have biases, it’s how aware we are of these issues and how we deal with them that counts.

It’s out of scope to list and describe them all (just thinking I know them all is probably an example of Dunning-Kruger). We’ll focus on two that are most immediately relevant when you’re handed supposedly-objective metrics and told to design to them. At least, these are two that I most often see, but that may be selection bias.

Selection bias

Any metric or statistical analysis is only as good as (in part) what you choose to measure. Selection bias is when your choice of what to measure isn’t really random or representative. This can come from a conscious attempt to skew the result, from carelessly overlooking context, or due to some hidden process.

One example might be if you’re trying to determine the average height of the adult male in the United States and find it to be 6'4"—oops, we only collected the heights of basketball players. Online opinion polls are basically embodied examples of selection bias, as the readers of a partisan site are there because they already share the site operator’s opinion. Or you may be given a survey that shows 95 percent of users of your startup’s app say they love it, but when you dig in to the numbers, the people surveyed were all grandmothers of the startup team employees (“Oh, you made this, dear? I love it!”). This holds in usability testing, too: if you only select, say, high-level programmers, you may be convinced that a “to install this app, recompile your OS kernel” is a totally usable feature. Or end up with Pied Piper’s UI.

Now, these all seem like “sure, obvs” examples. But selection bias can show up in much more subtle forms, and in things like clinical studies. Dr. Madhukar Pai’s slides here give some great examples — especially check out Slide 47, which shows how telephone surveys have almost built-in selection biases.

So, what’s a designer to do? As you can see from Dr. Pai’s lecture slides, you can quickly get into some pretty “mathy” work, but the main point is that when you’re faced with a metric, after you’ve checked out the context, look at the sample. You can think about the claim on the cookie box in this way. It’s “20% more tasty”?  What was the sample, 19 servings of chopped liver and one cookie?

Confirmation bias

Storytelling is a powerful tool. Again, it’s how our brains are wired. But as with all tools, it can be used for good or for evil, and can be intentional or accidental. As designers, we’re told we have to be storytellers: how do people act, how do they meet-cute our product, how do they feel, what’s the character arc? This is how we build our knowledge of the world, by building stories about it. But, as Alberto Cairo explains in The Truthful Art this is closely linked to confirmation bias, where we unconsciously (or consciously) search for, select, shape, remember, interpret, or otherwise torture basic information so that it matches what we already think we know, the stories we have. We want to believe.

Confirmation bias can drive selection bias, certainly. If you only test your design with users who already know how your product works (say, power users, stakeholders, and the people who built the product), you will get distorted numbers and a distorted sense of how usable your product is. Don’t laugh: I know of a very large and popular internet company that only does user re-search with power users and stakeholders.

But even if the discovery process is clean, confirmation bias can screw up the interpretation. As Cairo writes, “Even if we are presented with information that renders our beliefs worthless, we’ll try to avoid looking at it, or we’ll twist it in a way that confirms them. We humans try to reduce dissonance no matter what.” What could this mean for your design practice? What could this mean for your designs when stakeholders want you to design to specific data?

Reading (Numbers) is Fundamental

So, yes. If you can work with a data scientist in your design team, definitely do so. Try to work with her and learn alongside her. But if you don’t have this luxury, or the luxury of studying statistics in depth, think of data literacy as a vital part of your design practice. Mike Monteiro is passionate that designers need to know math, and he’s of course correct, but we don’t need to know math just to calculate visual design. We need to know math enough to know how to question and analyze any metric we’re given.

This is something you can practice in everyday life, especially in an election season. When you see someone citing a study, or quoting a number, ask: What was measured? How was it measured? What was the context? What wasn’t measured? Does that work out in real life? Keep looking up terms like selection bias, confirmation bias, Dunning-Kruger, sample size effect, until you remember them and their application. That is how you build habits, and how you’ll build your data literacy muscles.

I’ve long loved the Richard Feynman quote (that Cairo cites in The Truthful Art): “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself — and you are the easiest person to fool.” Consider always that you might be fooling yourself by blindly accepting any metric handed to you. And remember, the second-easiest person to fool is the person who likely handed you the metric, and is motivated to believe a particular outcome. Data literacy requires honesty, mastering numeracy, and stepping through the habits we’ve discussed. Practice every day with news from politics: does a statistic in the news give you that “of course, that’s how things are” feeling? Take a deep breath, and dig in; do you agree with a policy or action because it’s your political party proposing it? What’s the context, the sample size, the bias?

It’s tough to query yourself this way. But that’s the job. It’s tougher to query someone else this way, whether it’s your boss or your significant other. I can’t help you figure out the politics and social minefield of those. But do try. The quality of your work (and life) may depend on it.

Resources
Categories: thinktime

Three things to keep in mind about your reputation

Seth Godin - Tue 20th Sep 2016 18:09
Your reputation has as much impact on your life as what you actually do. Early assumptions about you are sticky and are difficult to change. The single best way to maintain your reputation is to do things you're proud of....        Seth Godin
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Understanding taxonomy

Seth Godin - Mon 19th Sep 2016 19:09
If you need to add a word to the dictionary, it's pretty clear where it goes. The dictionary is a handy reminder of how taxonomies work. The words aren't sorted by length, or frequency or date of first usage. They're...        Seth Godin
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This week's sponsor: OPTIMAL WORKSHOP

a list apart - Mon 19th Sep 2016 14:09

OPTIMAL WORKSHOP — test your website‘s performance with fast and powerful UX research tools.​

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The opposite of the freeloader problem

Seth Godin - Sun 18th Sep 2016 18:09
Is the freegiver advantage. Freeloaders, of course, are people who take more than they give, drains on the system. But the opposite, the opposite is magical. These are the people who feed the community first, who give before taking, who...        Seth Godin
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The post-reality paradox

Seth Godin - Sat 17th Sep 2016 18:09
Reality and rational thought have paid more dividends in the last century than ever before. Science-based medicine has dramatically increased the lifespan and health of people around the world. Vaccines have prevented millions of children from lifelong suffering and even...        Seth Godin
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But how much does it cost?

Seth Godin - Fri 16th Sep 2016 19:09
I know what the price tag says. But what does it cost? Does it need dry cleaning? What does it eat? How long does the training take? What happens when it breaks? Where will I store it? What's the productivity...        Seth Godin
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The professional pushes back

Seth Godin - Thu 15th Sep 2016 19:09
The architect refuses to design the big, ugly building that merely maximizes short term revenue. She understands that raising the average is part of her job. The surgeon refuses to do needless surgery, no matter how much the client insists....        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

The clown suit

Seth Godin - Wed 14th Sep 2016 18:09
It's ever more tempting to put on the (metaphorical) clown suit. It allows you to provoke with impunity. Clowns enjoy a different relationship with the laws of physics. You can spray someone in the face with a seltzer bottle, hit...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Designing Interface Animation: an Interview with Val Head

a list apart - Wed 14th Sep 2016 00:09

A note from the editors: To mark the publication of Designing Interface Animation, ALA managing editor Mica McPheeters and editor Caren Litherland reached out to Val Head via Google Hangouts and email for a freewheeling conversation about web animation. The following interview has been edited for clarity and brevity.

Animation is not new, of course, but its journey on the web has been rocky. For years, technological limitations compelled us to take sides: Should we design rich, captivating sites in Flash? Or should we build static, standards-compliant sites with HTML and CSS (and maybe a little JavaScript)?

Author Val Head describes herself as a “weirdo” who never wanted to choose between those two extremes—and, thanks to the tools at our disposal today, we no longer have to. Without compromising standards, we can now create complex animations natively in the browser: from subtle transitions using CSS to immersive, 3-D worlds with WebGL. Animation today is not just on the web, but of the web. And that, says Val, is a very big deal.

Caren Litherland: Are people intimidated by animation?

Val Head: There are definitely some web folks out there who are intimidated by the idea of using web animation in their work. For some, it’s such a new thing—very few of us have a formal background in motion design or animation—and it can be tough to know where to start or how to use it. I’ve noticed there’s some hesitation to embrace web animation due to the “skip intro” era of Flash sites. There seems to be a fear of recreating past mistakes. But it doesn’t have to be that way at all.

We’re in a new era of web animation right now. The fact that we can create animation with the same technologies we’ve always used to make websites—things like CSS and JavaScript—completely changes the landscape. Now that we can make animation that is properly “of the web” (to borrow a phrase from Jeremy Keith), not just tacked on top with a plug-in, we get to define what the new definition of web animation is with our work.

Right now, on the web, we can create beautiful, purposeful animation that is also accessible, progressively enhanced, and performant. No other medium can do that. Which is really exciting!

CL: I’ve always felt that there was something kind of ahistorical and ahistoricizing about the early web. As the web has matured, it seems to have taken a greater interest in the history and traditions that inform it. Web typography is a good example of this increased self-awareness. Can the same be said for animation?

VH: I think so! In the early days of the web, designers often looked down on it as a less capable medium. Before web type was a thing, a number of my designer friends would say that they could never design for the web because it wasn’t expressive enough as a medium. That the web couldn’t really do design. Then the web matured, web type came along, and that drastically changed how we designed for the web. Web animation is doing much the same thing. It’s another way we have now to be expressive with our design choices, to tell stories, to affect the experience in meaningful ways, and to make our sites unique.

With type, we turned to the long-standing craft of print typography for some direction and ideas, but the more we work with type on the web, the more web typography becomes its own thing. The same is true of web animation. We can look to things like the 12 classic principles of animation for reference, but we’re still defining exactly what web animation will be and the tools and technologies we use for it. Web animation adds another dimension to how we can design on the web and another avenue for reflecting on what the rich histories of design, animation, and film can teach us.

Mica McPheeters: Do you find that animation often gets tacked on at the end of projects? Why is that? Shouldn’t it be incorporated from the outset?

VH: Yes, it often does get left to the end of projects and almost treated as just the icing on top. That’s a big part of what can make animation seem like it’s too hard or ineffective. If you leave any thought of animation until the very end of a project, it’s pretty much doomed to fail or just be meaningless decoration.

Web animation can be so much more than just decoration, but only if we make it part of our design process. It can’t be a meaningful addition to the user experience if you don’t include it in the early conversations that define that experience.

Good web animation takes a whole team. You need input from all disciplines touching the design to make it work well. It can’t just be designed in a vacuum and tossed over the fence. That approach fails spectacularly well when it comes to animation.

Communicating animation ideas and making animation truly part of the process can be the biggest hurdle for teams to embrace animation. Change is hard! That’s why I dedicated two entire chapters of the book to how to get animation done in the real world. I focus on how to communicate animation ideas to teammates and stakeholders, as well as how to prototype those ideas efficiently so you can get to solutions without wasting time. I also cover how to represent animation in your design systems or documentation to empower everyone (no matter what their background is) to make good motion design decisions.

CL: Can you say more about the importance of a motion audit? Can it be carried out in tandem with a content audit? And how do content and animation tie in with each other?

VH: I find motion audits to be incredibly useful before creating a motion style guide or before embarking on new design efforts. It’s so helpful to know where animation is already being used, and to take an objective look at how effective it is both from a UX angle and a branding angle. If you have a team of any significant size, chances are you’ve probably got a lot of redundant, and maybe even conflicting, styles and uses of animation in your site. Motion audits give you a chance to see what you’re already doing, identify things that are working, as well as things that might be broken or just need a little work. They’re also a great way to identify places where animation could provide value but isn’t being used yet.

Looking at all your animation efforts at a high level gives you a chance to consolidate the design decisions behind them, and establish a cohesive approach to animation that will help tie the experience together across mediums and viewport sizes. You really need that high-level view of animation when creating a motion style guide or animation guidelines.

You could definitely collect the data for a motion audit in tandem with a content audit. You’ll likely be looking in all the same places, just collecting up more data as you go through your whole site.

There is a strong tie between content and animation. I’ve been finding this more and more as I work with my consulting clients. Both can be focused around having a strong message and communicating meaningfully. When you have a clear vision of what you want to say, you can say it with the motion you use just like you can say it with the words you choose.

Voice and tone documents can be a great place to start for deciding how your brand expresses itself in motion. I’ve leaned on these more than once in my consulting work. Those same words you use to describe how you’d like your content to feel can be a basis of how you aim to make the animation feel as well. When all your design choices—everything from content, color, type, animation—come from the same place, they create a powerful and cohesive message.

CL: One thing in your book that I found fascinating was your statement that animation “doesn’t have to include large movements or even include motion at all.” Can you talk more about that? And is there any sort of relationship between animation and so called calm technology?

VH: It’s true, animation doesn’t always mean movement. Motion and animation are really two different things, even though we tend to use the words interchangeably. Animation is a change in some property over time, and that property doesn’t have to be a change in position. It can be a change in opacity, or color, or blur. Those kinds of non-movement animation convey a different feel and message than animation with a lot of motion.

If you stick to animating only non-movement properties like opacity, color, and blur, your interface will likely have a more calm and stable feel than if it included a lot of movement. So if your goal is to design something that feels calm, animation can definitely be a part of how you convey that feeling.

Any time you use animation, it says something, there’s no getting around that. When you’re intentional with what you want it to say and how it fits in with the rest of your design effort, you can create animation that feels like it’s so much a part of the design that it’s almost invisible. That’s a magical place to be for design.

MM: Do we also need to be mindful of the potential of animation to cause harm?

VH: We do. Animation can help make interfaces more accessible by reducing cognitive load, helping to focus attention in the right place, or other ways. But it also has potential to cause harm, depending on how you use it. Being aware of how animation can potentially harm or help users leads us to make better decisions when designing it. I included a whole chapter in the book on animating responsibly because it’s an important consideration. I also wrote about how animation can affect people with vestibular disorders a little while back on A List Apart.

MM: Who today, in your opinion, is doing animation right/well/interestingly?

VH: I’m always on the lookout for great uses of animation on the web—in fact, I highlight noteworthy uses of web animation every week in the UI Animation Newsletter.

Stripe Checkout has been one of my favorites for how well it melds UI animation seamlessly into the design. It really achieves that invisible animation that is so well integrated that you don’t necessarily notice it at first. The smooth 3D, microinteraction animation, and sound design on the Sirin Labs product page are also really well done, but take a completely different approach to UI animation than Checkout.

Publications have been using animation in wonderful ways for dataviz and storytelling lately, too. The Wall Street Journal’s Hamilton algorithm piece was a recent data-based favorite of mine and the New York Times did some wonderful storytelling work with animation around the Olympics with their piece on Simone Biles. Also, I really love seeing editorial animation, like the Verge had on a story about Skype’s sound design. The animations they used really brought the story and the sounds they were discussing come to life.

I really love seeing web animation used in such a variety of ways. It makes me extra excited for the future of web animation!

MM: Any parting thoughts, Val?

VH: My best advice for folks who want to use more animation in their work is to start small and don’t be afraid to take risks as you get more comfortable working with animation. The more you animate, the better you’ll get at developing a sense for how to design it well. I wrote Designing Interface Animation to give web folks a solid foundation on animation to build from and I’m really excited to see how web animation will evolve in the near future.

For even more web animation tips and resources, join me and a great bunch of designers and developers on the UI Animation Newsletter for a weekly dose of animation knowledge.

Categories: thinktime

Designing Interface Animation

a list apart - Wed 14th Sep 2016 00:09

A note from the editors: We’re pleased to share Chapter 9 of Val Head’s new book, Designing Interface Animation: Meaningful Motion for User Experience, available now from Rosenfeld. For 20% off all books purchased through rosenfeldmedia.com, use the discount code ALADIA.

Each animation in an interface tells a micro story, and as a user encounters more and more animations throughout your site or product, these micro stories add up to reveal the personality and story of the brand or product behind them. The animations create an impression; they give your brand a certain personality. It’s up to us as designers to take control of the combined story that animations are telling about the brand we’re working on. Your animations will be much more effective if you intentionally design the additional messages they’re sending.

Brand animation design guidelines aren’t something entirely new, of course. Brands have been expressing themselves in motion in commercials, TV bumpers, video titles, and similar places for years, and they’ve had guidelines for those mediums. What’s new is the idea of needing animation design guidelines for the web or interfaces. Even if your brand will never be in a traditional commercial or video, having a website is enough of a reason to need a motion style guide these days.

How Your Brand Moves Tells Its Story

Deciding what you use animation for, and how you implement it, for a particular project defines how you express your brand or tell your brand’s story with animation. Often, the decisions of which properties to animate or what easing to use on which elements is done at the component or page level without considering the bigger picture. Assembling a global set of rules about motion and animation for your entire project will help you make more cohesive animation decisions moving forward. These choices lead to more consistent design decisions surrounding animation and make your design stronger overall. It requires you to go back and forth between the big picture of the overall project and the more detailed components, but your entire design will benefit from looking at the project from both perspectives as you work.

There are two approaches to begin defining how your brand expresses itself in motion. The first is to go from the bottom up: start by evaluating what you already have and build from there. The second is to go from the top down: first, determine what it is your brand should be saying about itself on a high level, and then determine how individual animations will express that concept.

The first approach works best for existing projects that already use animation. There could be hidden gems of communication to build upon in the animations you’ve already designed—ones that will inform the bigger picture you’re working to define. The second approach is generally your only option when starting a brand new project, as there won’t be any existing animation to start from. Whichever approach you choose (or even if you use both), you’ll arrive at the same end result, a common set of guidelines for putting your brand in motion, so they are equally good places to begin.

Defining Your Brand in Motion from the Bottom Up

Before you start documenting for the future, you need to get a good picture of what you’re currently using animation for. It’s hard to move forward before knowing where you currently stand. (That is, unless you’re planning to throw it all out and start over.) For existing projects that already use animation, you can start with a motion audit to find all the instances and ways you’re currently using animation. Collecting these in one place will identify the common threads and even help you eliminate unnecessary duplicated or overly similar animations. A motion audit will focus your animation efforts and the design reasoning behind them.

A motion audit gathers up all the interface animations you’re currently using to identify patterns and evaluate their effectiveness as a group.

The Motion Audit

To collect all your animations in one place, you’ll need some screen recording software that will output video. QuickTime is a handy built-in option for Macs, but a more specialized tool like ScreenFlow can save you some time with its more robust cropping and editing tools. Use whichever tool is easiest and fastest for you. The exact software used is less important than the end collection and what it will tell you.

How to do a motion audit (Fig. 9.1):

  • Collect screen recordings of every animation currently on your site. (Be sure to get a recording of all the different states for interactive animations.)
  • Crop and edit the video clips as needed to focus in on the animations.
  • Assemble all the video clips into one document and group them in categories according to content type (for example, one slide for all the button animations, one slide for navigation animations, etc.).
  • Review the document with your team to evaluate your brand’s existing animation style.

When you have all of those in one place, you can look for global trends, find potential redundancies, and most importantly, evaluate if the way you’re currently using animation accurately reflects the personality of your brand or product.

Fig 9.1: A screenshot of a page/slide of a motion audit document created for Shopify. Software for Motion Audits Recording Animations

For the screen recording part of motion audits, I like to use ScreenFlow. It’s Mac only, but Camtasia offers similar functionality for both Windows and Mac. The QuickTime player that comes installed with OS X is also an option. It’s especially good for recording animations from an iPhone. Just plug it into the computer and select it as a camera in QuickTime.

The Motion Audit Document

My preferred software for the end document is Keynote. (PowerPoint would do just fine here as well.) I prefer it because it makes it easy to set each animation’s video clip to play when clicked and because it lends itself well to be projected and discussed as a group.

When Keynote isn’t an option, creating a web-based motion audit is a good alternative. It’s easy to share, and the video clips can be played directly from within the web pages. I find that having the videos playable from the document is really useful. Often, you’ll discover animations that some of your teammates weren’t aware of or maybe haven’t encountered in a while.

The key is having an end result that can be shared and discussed easily. So if there’s another format that your team has a strong preference for, you can make that work, too.

Evaluate Your Existing Animation’s Design

The first question you’ll want to investigate is: Does the personality expressed by the existing animations fit your brand? Look at the qualities of the animations you’re using to answer this one. What kind of personality traits do the easing and timing used convey? If it’s snappy and bouncy, does that match your brand’s personality and energy? If it’s all stable ease-in-outs, is your brand personality also stable and decided? If you find the mood of the animations doesn’t fit your brand’s personality, small changes to the easing and timing could make a huge difference to bring the animation in line with your brand.

If the personality conveyed from your animations is all over the place and not cohesive at all, starting over and taking the top-down approach described might be the next best step. It’s often easier to work from the top down with a clear vision, as opposed to trying to fix a huge group of existing animations that are all a little bit off.

If the personality conveyed by your animations does fit your brand perfectly, great! Take a detailed look at what all these animations have in common. List the easing, timing, and other design choices they have in common. This will be the basis of your brand’s animation style guide.

Evaluate Your Existing Animation’s Purpose

Next, look at the purpose of the animations you’ve collected. How are they aiding your users in their tasks? Are they bringing something positive to the experience? Their purpose can be anything from something tactical like providing feedback to something more branding related like expressing your brand’s personality. Challenge yourself to articulate a purpose for each one to help you evaluate how useful they are. If there’s no definable purpose for an animation to be there, consider eliminating or redesigning it to have a solid purpose and goal. (Good UX purposes for animation are covered in Chapters 4 through 8.)

It’s also helpful to group the animations in your motion audit by their purpose—gathering up all the animations that are there to give feedback into one section, for example. This can reveal some helpful insights, similarities, and patterns among animations that share a similar purpose.

Define Your Brand in Motion from the Top Down

If your brand doesn’t currently use any animation or if you’re starting a new project, you can develop your brand’s animation design guidelines from the top down instead. That is, start from your brand’s design philosophy or the traits your brand aims to embody and decide how to translate those into animation. It’s starting from a different place, but it gets you to the same end goal of having specific and defined ways that your brand will exist in motion.

The Words You Use to Describe Your Brand

Start with the adjectives that you use to describe your brand or product. The description of the personality or feelings it aims to create. Is your brand energetic? Friendly? Strong? Playful? Stable? All this descriptive language can be translated into motion just like it can for other design tools like typography and color. Animation speaks in similar ways.

A great place to look for these descriptive words is in your copywriting guidelines or voice and tone guidelines. Many of the same words used to describe how to write for your brand can be directly applied to motion as well. Brand style guides or brand books can also be a good source for descriptive language.

If none of the above exists for your brand, you’ll need to do a little work to define your brand’s voice. “5 Easy Steps to Define and Use Your Brand Voice” by Erika Heald could be helpful for a quick start. Or to get even deeper into defining your brand, I recommend reading Designing Brand Identity by Alina Wheeler.

Energetic

If your brand is energetic, friendly, or bold, animation that relies on a lot of overshoots or follow-through and anticipation can help convey a sense of energy. Softly overshooting the target position can make animations feel both friendly and energetic. Drastic overshoots and quick speed changes read as bold and outgoing. Taken even further, adding a bit of bounce to overshoots or follow-through can convey a sense of even more energy in a movement—so much energy that an object has to bounce off its destination once or twice before it settles (Fig. 9.2).




Fig 9.2: Follow-through and overshoots in motion come across as energetic. The more exaggerated the movement, the more energy is implied. See it in action in this video.

Quick, soft movements—like overshoots—tend to read as energetic in a friendly way. On the other hand, quick movement with sharp changes in direction can suggest impatience, curtness, or urgency. That kind of movement is difficult to show in print, but you can see a video version here to see what I mean.

Playful and Friendly

Playful brands can take advantage of squash and stretch to convey that playfulness (Fig. 9.3). Squash and stretch also makes movements read as energetic. However, beware, because it can also make motion look childish or sloppy if it’s done with too much of a heavy hand. But, on the other hand, when it’s done well, it can really set you apart.

Bouncy easing can also evoke friendliness or playfulness. Wobbly bounces can seem playful and elastic, while springy bounces can seem friendly.




Fig 9.3: Squash and stretch tends to create a sense of playfulness and a little goes a long way. See it in action in this video. Decisive and Sure

Ease-in-outs—that is any easing that gradually speeds up into the action, is fastest in the middle, and then slows at the end of the action—are balanced and stable. They produce animation that accelerates into the action and then slows down to hit its end target exactly and with precision and decisiveness. Sticking with variations of ease-in-outs can communicate a sense of stability and balance for your brand. A variation of ease-in-out easing applied to a simple horizontal movement would look like this video example in Fig. 9.4.

Fig 9.4: Motion with ease-in-out easing like the graph above, and similar easing curve variations, tends to read as calm and decisive action because elements move fastest in the middle of the action and decelerate into their final position. You can see the resulting motion in this video. Calm

The amount of movement you employ can also say something about your brand. Animation doesn’t necessarily have to include large movements or even include motion at all. Smaller movements read as more calm and subtle than larger more drastic movements. Using smaller movements can contribute to the stable and calm personality of your brand.

You can still imply the same kinds of movements, just in a less drastic way. For example, when you aim to create small movements, you might have a modal animate into place from 50% of the way down the screen instead of 100% off-screen past the bottom of the visible area (Fig. 9.5).







Fig 9.5: Both squares in the frames above arrive at the same destination, but the first one gets there by moving a shorter distance. This smaller movement often reads as feeling calmer and more subdued than larger movements. See both in action in video: small movements vs. large movements. Stable

Animating properties like opacity and blur instead of creating movement is another way of conveying a sense of calm and stability (Fig. 9.6). (Animating these properties will change the appearance of the object—making it more transparent or blurred, for example—but because the position of the element isn’t being animated, no movement will occur.) It can also convey a sense of softness or even feel dreamy, depending on how softly you use the opacity and blurs. Sticking to these nonmovement properties can still say so much about your brand in small spaces where motion may not be possible or desirable.




Fig 9.6: Animating non-motion properties, like blur and opacity, can read as more stable and subtle. See it in action in this video.

These are just the start of adjectives to consider when trying to convey a specific type of energy in the design of your animation. Like most other design tools, it’s more of an art than a science. Experiment with the guidelines to find what expresses your brand best for you.

Referencing Motion from Real Life

Looking to the physical world can be a great option for finding your brand’s style for motion by finding a physical object or creature to emulate with your on-screen animation. Technically, you could choose anything at all to base your motion on, but this works best when the thing you choose is relevant—either literally or metaphorically—to your product or brand.

IBM has done a wonderful job of this with its Machines in Motion design guidelines. IBM used to make those giant, room-sized computers, typewriters, and other hardware before becoming the IBM they are today. They decided to reach back to their rich history as a company when defining how they would express their brand in motion (Fig. 9.7).

Fig 9.7: IBM’s Machines in Motion design guidelines pair movements from the physical products IBM used to make with matching motion for their animation interactions. See it in action

They used these past machines to inform their motion design efforts on two levels. On a high level, they chose four machine traits that all their interface motions should embody: agility, efficiency, precision, and order. From there, they got more specific and paired motion from the actual machines with screen-based equivalent animations. On-screen menu drawers are animated to have the same motion as the carriage return motion of a 1970s IBM typewriter. Loading spinners are animated to have the same acceleration patterns as reel-to-reel tapes of an old mainframe’s tape drives.

These one-to-one translations of motion from the historical real-world objects to the screen-based motion inform all of their motion design decisions. If you have physical objects, either historical or not, that are significant to your brand or product, you could develop your own guidelines using this same approach.

A more metaphorical approach to emulating real-world objects can work well, too. Finding a particular dance piece or animal movement that speaks to the same personality values as your brand can be a great place to start. Music can be a source of motion inspiration, even if you’re not including any sound in your interface. Choosing a specific rhythm or phrasing from music to apply to your animation’s movement brings a whole new dimension to the idea of UX choreography. There are so many possibilities out there. Find something that feels inspiring for your brand and explore how it can establish a cohesive thread through all your animations.

Staying on Point
  • Animation design guidelines or values can help keep your brand’s motion efforts consistent and cohesive.
  • Collecting and evaluating existing animations as a group with a motion audit can give you valuable insight into how you’re currently using animation.
  • The same words you use to describe your brand and its values can be translated into motion to define your brand’s motion style.
  • Looking to real-world objects or animals to emulate can also help define what your brand looks like in motion.
Categories: thinktime

A value creation checklist

Seth Godin - Tue 13th Sep 2016 18:09
This project you’re working on, the new business or offering, what sort of value does it create? Who is it for? What mindset and worldview and situation? Is it paid for by organizations or individuals? Does it solve a new...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

What's at the bottom of the river?

Seth Godin - Mon 12th Sep 2016 19:09
I have no idea if the bottom of the Hudson River is smooth or not. I know that on a calm day, the surface is like glass. One reason to lower the water level of a system you count on...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

This week's sponsor: HIRED

a list apart - Mon 12th Sep 2016 14:09

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Categories: thinktime

Erosion

Seth Godin - Sun 11th Sep 2016 18:09
The Grand Canyon wasn't created by an earthquake. While it's tempting to imagine that the world changes via sudden shocks, that our culture is shifted by dramatic changes in leadership, that grand gestures make all the difference... It turns out...        Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

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