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David Rowe: SM1000 Part 7 – Over the air in Germany

Planet Linux Australia - 7 hours 59 min ago

Michael Wild DL2F2 in Germany recently attended a Hamfest where he demonstrated his SM1000. Michael sent me the following email (hint: I used Google translate on the web sites):

Here is the link to the review of our local hamfest.

At the bottom is a video of a short QSO on 40m using the SM-1000 over about 400km. The other station was Hermann (DF2DR). Hermann documented this QSO very well on his homepage also showing a snapshot of the waterfall during this QSO. Big selective fading as you can see, but we were doing well!

He also explains that, when switching to SSB at the same average power level, the voice was almost not understandable!

SM1000 Beta and FreeDV Update

Rick KA8BMA has been working hard on the Beta CAD work, and fighting a few Eagle DRC battles. Thanks to all his hard work we now have an up to date schematic and BOM for the Betas. He is now working on the Beta PCB layout, and we are refining the BOM with Edwin from Dragino in China. Ike, W3IKIE, has kindly been working with Rick to come up with a suitable enclosure. Thanks guys!

My current estimate is that the Beta SM1000s will be assembled in November. Once I’ve tested a few I’ll put them up on my store and start taking orders.

In the mean time I’ve thrown myself into modem simulations – playing with a 450 bit/s version of Codec 2, LPDC FEC codes, diversity schemes and coherent QPSK demodulation. I’m pushing towards a new FreeDV mode that works on fading channels at negative SNRs. More on that in later posts. The SM1000 and a new FreeDV mode are part of my goals for 2014. The SM1000 will make FreeDV easy to use, the new mode(s) will make it competitive with SSB on HF radio.

Everything is open source, both hardware and software. No vendor lock in, no software licenses and you are free to experiment and innovate.

Categories: thinktime

Chris Samuel: IBM Pays GlobalFoundries to take Microprocessor Business

Planet Linux Australia - 10 hours 2 min ago

Interesting times for IBM, having already divested themselves of the x86 business by selling it on to Lenovo they’ve now announced that they’re paying GlobalFoundries $1.5bn to take pretty much that entire side of the business!

IBM (NYSE: IBM) and GLOBALFOUNDRIES today announced that they have signed a Definitive Agreement under which GLOBALFOUNDRIES plans to acquire IBM’s global commercial semiconductor technology business, including intellectual property, world-class technologists and technologies related to IBM Microelectronics, subject to completion of applicable regulatory reviews. GLOBALFOUNDRIES will also become IBM’s exclusive server processor semiconductor technology provider for 22 nanometer (nm), 14nm and 10nm semiconductors for the next 10 years.

It includes IBM’s IP and patents, though IBM will continue to do research for 5 years and GlobalFoundries will get access to that. Now what happens to those researchers (one of whom happens to be a friend of mine) after that isn’t clear.

When I heard the rumours yesterday I was wondering if IBM was aiming to do an ARM and become a fab-less CPU designer but this is much more like exiting the whole processor business altogether. The fact that they seem to be paying Global Foundries to take this off their hands also makes it sound pretty bad.

What this all means for their Power CPU is uncertain, and if I was nVidia and Mellanox in the OpenPOWER alliance I would be hoping I’d know about this before joining up!

This item originally posted here:



IBM Pays GlobalFoundries to take Microprocessor Business

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 264: Pupil Free Day means lots of park play

Planet Linux Australia - Mon 20th Oct 2014 21:10

Today was a Kindergarten (and it seemed most of the schools in Brisbane) Pupil Free Day.

Grace, the head honcho of Thermomix in Australia, was supposed to be in town for a meet and greet, and a picnic in New Farm Park had been organised, but at the last minute she wasn't able to make it due to needing to be in Perth for a meeting. The plan changed and we had a Branch-level picnic meeting at the Colmslie Beach Reserve.

So after Sarah dropped Zoe off, I whipped up some red velvet cheesecake brownie, which seems to be my go to baked good when required to bring a plate (it's certainly popular) and I had some leftover sundried tomatoes, so I whipped up some sundried tomato dip as well.

The meet up in the park was great. My group leader's daughters were there, as were plenty of other consultant's kids due to the Pupile Free Day, and Zoe was happy to hang out and have a play. There was lots of yummy food, and we were able to graze and socialise a bit. We called it lunch.

After we got home, we had a bit of a clean up of the balcony, which had quite a lot of detritus from various play dates and craft activities. Once that was done, we had some nice down time in the hammock.

We then biked over to a park to catch up with Zoe's friend Mackensie for a play date. The girls had a really nice time, and I discovered that the missing link in the riverside bike path has been completed, which is rather nice for both cycling and running. (It goes to show how long it's been since I've gone for a run, I really need to fix that).

After that, we biked home, and I made dinner. We got through dinner pretty quickly, and so Zoe and I made a batch of ginger beer after dinner, since there was a Thermomix recipe for it. It was cloudy though, and Zoe was more used to the Bunderberg ginger beer, which is probably a bit better filtered, so she wasn't so keen on it.

All in all, it was a really lovely way to spend a Pupil Free Day.

Categories: thinktime

"Desire is full of endless distances"

Seth Godin - Mon 20th Oct 2014 19:10
Just one more level on this game, she says. Once I get to level 68, I'll be done. Just one more tweak to the car, they beg. Once we bump up the mileage, we'll be done. Just one more lotion,...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Francois Marier: LXC setup on Debian jessie

Planet Linux Australia - Mon 20th Oct 2014 13:10

Here's how to setup LXC-based "chroots" on Debian jessie. While this is documented on the Debian wiki, I had to tweak a few things to get the networking to work on my machine.

Start by installing (as root) the necessary packages:

apt-get install lxc libvirt-bin debootstrap Network setup

I decided to use the default /etc/lxc/default.conf configuration (no change needed here):

lxc.network.type = veth lxc.network.flags = up lxc.network.link = virbr0 lxc.network.hwaddr = 00:FF:AA:xx:xx:xx lxc.network.ipv4 = 0.0.0.0/24

but I had to make sure that the "guests" could connect to the outside world through the "host":

  1. Enable IPv4 forwarding by putting this in /etc/sysctl.conf:

    net.ipv4.ip_forward=1
  2. and then applying it using:

    sysctl -p
  3. Ensure that the network bridge is automatically started on boot:

    virsh -c lxc:/// net-start default virsh -c lxc:/// net-autostart default
  4. and that it's not blocked by the host firewall, by putting this in /etc/network/iptables.up.rules:

    -A INPUT -d 224.0.0.251 -s 192.168.122.1 -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -d 192.168.122.255 -s 192.168.122.1 -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -d 192.168.122.1 -s 192.168.122.0/24 -j ACCEPT
  5. and applying the rules using:

    iptables-apply
Creating a container

Creating a new container (in /var/lib/lxc/) is simple:

sudo MIRROR=http://ftp.nz.debian.org/debian lxc-create -n sid64 -t debian -- -r sid -a amd64

You can start or stop it like this:

sudo lxc-start -n sid64 -d sudo lxc-stop -n sid64 Connecting to a guest using ssh

The ssh server is configured to require pubkey-based authentication for root logins, so you'll need to log into the console:

sudo lxc-stop -n sid64 sudo lxc-start -n sid64

then install a text editor inside the container because the root image doesn't have one by default:

apt-get install vim

then paste your public key in /root/.ssh/authorized_keys.

Then you can exit the console (using Ctrl+a q) and ssh into the container. You can find out what IP address the container received from DHCP by typing this command:

sudo lxc-ls --fancy Fixing Perl locale errors

If you see a bunch of errors like these when you start your container:

perl: warning: Setting locale failed. perl: warning: Please check that your locale settings: LANGUAGE = (unset), LC_ALL = (unset), LANG = "fr_CA.utf8" are supported and installed on your system. perl: warning: Falling back to the standard locale ("C").

then log into the container as root and use:

dpkg-reconfigure locales

to enable the same locales as the ones you have configured in the host.

Categories: thinktime

Simon Lyall: Links: Docker, Dollar Vans, Bus Bunching and Languages

Planet Linux Australia - Mon 20th Oct 2014 10:10
Categories: thinktime

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Pavel Emelyanov, Alasdair Allan

Planet Linux Australia - Mon 20th Oct 2014 07:10
Pavel Emelyanov Libcontainer: One lib to rule them all

10:40 pm Friday 16th January 2015

Pavel Emelyanov is a principal engineer at Parallels working on server virtualization projects. He holds a PhD degree in Applied Mathematics from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology. His speaking experience includes the talk on network namespaces at LinuxCon 2009 and the presentation of the Virtuozzo resource management at the joint memory management, storage and filesystem summit in April 2011.

For more information on Pavel and his presentation, see here. You can follow him as @xemulp and don’t forget to mention #LCA2015.



Alasdair Allan Open Source Protocols and Architectures to Fix the Internet of Things…

3:40pm Friday 16th January 2015

Alasdair is a scientist, author, hacker, tinkerer and co-founder of a startup working on fixing the Internet of Things. He spends much of his time probing current trends in an attempt to determine which technologies are going to define our future.

He has also written articles for Make magazine. The latest entitled “Pick up your tools and get started!” posted 1 September 2014.

For more information on Alasdair and his presentation, see here. You can follow him as @aallan and don’t forget to mention #LCA2015.

Categories: thinktime

Sridhar Dhanapalan: Twitter posts: 2014-10-13 to 2014-10-19

Planet Linux Australia - Mon 20th Oct 2014 01:10
Categories: thinktime

"Google it!"

Seth Godin - Sun 19th Oct 2014 20:10
The job is no longer to recite facts, to read the bio out loud, to explain something better found or watched online. No, the job is to personally and passionately make us care enough to look up the facts for...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Mark Terle: A preponderance of yak shaving….

Planet Linux Australia - Sun 19th Oct 2014 15:10

It is often observed that attempting to undertake one task begets another, with the corollary that two days later you’ve built a bikeshed painted in a multitude of colours.

So, dear readers, this tale of woe begins with the need to update my blog to something useful after 18 months of neglect and more. I had been writing a travel blog from when I took some leave off work to wander the globe. For this task, a new more generic DNS entry and an upgrade to the WordPress installation and syndication with my Advogato blog. Easily accomplished and a sense of progress.

This blog entry is going to be mostly a technical one. I’ll try incorporating more of real life in other entries.

Great, now I can tell the world about my little project toying with Vagrant and Puppet.

It is called “Browser In A Box”. It is up on Github https://github.com/mtearle/browser-in-a-box

It is very simple, a Vagrant file and a set of Puppet manifests/modules to launch Chromium in kiosk mode inside a VM to hit a certain URL. This is part of planned later work to look at creating a Vagrant development environment for Concerto.

At this point, I got distracted … aside from the liberal upgrades of bash on various machines to address Shellshock

Then I accidentally purchased a new Ultrabook. My previous netbook had been getting long in the tooth and it was time to upgrade. I ended up purchasing a Toshiba Satellite NB10, a reasonable processor Intel N2830, 4 Gig of RAM and 500 Gigs of spinning rust. Those are the nice bits.

On the negatives, Crappy Toshiba keyboard layout with the ~ key in a stupid spot and a UEFI bios. It is now blatantly apparent why Matthew Garrett drinks copious quantities of gin.

Special brickbats go to the Ubuntu installer for repartitioning and eating my Windows installation and recovery partition. (The option to install over my test Debian installation got over enthusiastic).  The wireless chipset (Atheros) has a known problem where it confuses the access point.

The next distraction ended up being a fit of procastination in terms of rearranging my tiny apartment. I’ve now modelled it in a program called Sweet Home 3D. Easy and straight forward to use. Needs a few more furniture models, but perfectly functional. I shall use it again next time I move.

Finally, we arrive at the the original task. I want to start syncing my calendars between various locations (written here for my benefit later).

They are:

  • Work stream – From my Work (Exchange) to my private host (Radicale) to Google Calendar (which will get to my Android phone)
  • Personal stream – From my private host (Radicale) to Google Calendar (and back again)
  • Party stream – From Facebook’s ical export to my private host and Google Calendar

In addition, various syncing of contacts but not my primary focus at the moment.

It appears that syncevolution will do most of what I want here. The challenge revolves around how to get it working. Ultimately, I want to have this live headless hosted on a virtual machine not running a desktop.

In a fit of enthusiasm, I decided upon attempting to build it from source as opposed to using the packages provided from the upstream (to avoid dragging in unnecessary dependencies.

I need to build from HEAD due to recent code added to syncevolution to support the change in Google’s CALDAV API to be behind OAuth V2.

This was not an overly successful exercise, I ended up getting something built but it didn’t ultimately work.

Problems encountered were:

  • libwbxml2 – The upstream at opensync.org is down. There appears to be forks, so playing the game of guessing the current head/release version.
  • activesyncd – Build system is currently broken in parts. There appears to be bit rot around the evolution bindings as the evolution API has changed

I gave up at that point. I’ve since spun up a different virtual machine with Debian Jessie and an install of Gnome. The packages from the syncevolution upstream installed cleanly, but have yet to work out the incarnations to make it work. However, that my friends is a story for a later blog entry…

Categories: thinktime

linux.conf.au News: Multimedia and Music Miniconf - Call for Papers

Planet Linux Australia - Sun 19th Oct 2014 13:10

The Multimedia and Music Miniconf at LCA2015 will be held in Auckland, New Zealand, on Monday 12 January 2015. We are pleased to formally open the miniconf's Call for Papers. Submissions are encouraged from anyone with a story to tell which is related to open software for multimedia or music.

Examples of possible presentations include:

  • demonstrations of multimedia content authored using Open Source programs
  • audio recording examples
  • Open Source games
  • video and image editing on Linux
  • new multimedia software being written
  • multimedia web APIs and applications
  • unusual uses of Open Source multimedia software
  • codec news

In addition, we are planning to hold an informal jam session at the end of the Miniconf, giving community members a change to showcase their compositions and multimedia creations. Expressions of interest for this are also invited. If musical instruments are required it is preferable if participants arranged this themselves, but with sufficient lead time it might be possible to arrange a loan from locals in Auckland.

The miniconf website at annodex.org/events/lca2015 has further details about the miniconf.

To submit a proposal or for further information, please email Jonathan Woithe (jwoithe@atrad.com.au) or Silvia Pfeiffer (silviapfeiffer1@gmail.com).

Jonathan Woithe and Silvia Pfeiffer

(Multimedia and Music miniconf organisers)
Categories: thinktime

Andrew Donnellan: KDE 4/Plasma system tray not displaying applications, notifications appearing twice

Planet Linux Australia - Sat 18th Oct 2014 23:10

So I was trying to get RSIBreak working on my machine today, and for some reason it simply wasn’t displaying an icon in the Plasma system tray as it was meant to.

It took some searching around, but eventually I came across a comment on a KDE bug report that had the answer.

I opened up ~/.kde/config/plasma-desktop-appletsrc, searched for “systemtray“, and lo and behold, there were two Containments, both using the systemtray plugin. It seems that at some point during the history of my KDE installation, I ended up with two system trays, just with one that wasn’t visible.

After running kquitapp plasma to kill the desktop, I removed the first systemtray entry (I made an educated guess and decided that the first one was probably the one I didn’t want any more), saved the file and restarted Plasma.

Suddenly, not only did RSIBreak appear in my system tray, but so did a couple of other applications which I forgot I had installed. This also fixed the problem I was having with all KDE notifications appearing on screen twice, which was really rather annoying and I’m not sure how I coped with it for so long…



Filed under: Linux, Uncategorized Tagged: KDE, linux, Linux Tips
Categories: thinktime

Andrew Donnellan: The r8169 driver and mysterious network problems

Planet Linux Australia - Sat 18th Oct 2014 23:10

A few months ago, a friend of mine was having a problem. When he hooked up his Toshiba laptop to the Ethernet port in his bedroom, it would work under Windows, but not under Linux. When he hooked it up to the port in the room next door, it would work under both.

I headed over with my Samsung Ultrabook, and sure enough – it worked fine under Windows, but not Linux, while the room next door worked under both.

As it turns out, both our laptops used Realtek RTL8168-series Ethernet controllers, which are normally handled just fine by the r8169 driver, which can be found in the kernel mainline. However, Realtek also releases a r8168 driver (available in Debian as r8168-dkms). Upon installing that, everything worked fine.

(At some point I should probably go back and figure out why it didn’t work under r8169 so I can file a bug…)



Filed under: Hardware, Linux Tagged: Computing, Drivers, linux, Linux Tips
Categories: thinktime

Famous to the family

Seth Godin - Sat 18th Oct 2014 20:10
There is famous and there is famous to the family. Cousin Aaron is famous to my family. Or, to be less literal, the family of people like us might understand that Satya the milliner or perhaps Sarma Melngailis or Peter...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Lev Lafayette: PRINCE2 Checklist and Flowchart

Planet Linux Australia - Sat 18th Oct 2014 15:10

Recently a simple statement of PRINCE2 governance structures was provided. From this it is possible to derive a checklist for project managers to tick off, just to make sure that everything is done. Please note that this checklist is tailored and combines some functions. For example, there is no Business Review Plan as it is argued that any sensible project should incorporate these into the Business Case and the Project Plan.

A simple graphic is provided to assist with this process

read more

Categories: thinktime

Lev Lafayette: File Creation Time in Linux

Planet Linux Australia - Sat 18th Oct 2014 13:10

Linux offers most of the expected file attributes from the command line, including the owner of a file, the group, the size, the date modified and name. However often users want find out when a file was created. This requires a little bit of extra investigation.

read more

Categories: thinktime

Erik de Castro Lopo: Haskell : A neat trick for GHCi

Planet Linux Australia - Sat 18th Oct 2014 09:10

Just found a really nice little hack that makes working in the GHC interactive REPL a little easier and more convenient. First of all, I added the following line to my ~/.ghci file.

:set -DGHC_INTERACTIVE

All that line does is defines a GHC_INTERACTIVE pre-processor symbol.

Then in a file that I want to load into the REPL, I need to add this to the top of the file:

{-# LANGUAGE CPP #-}

and then in the file I can do things like:

#ifdef GHC_INTERACTIVE import Data.Aeson.Encode.Pretty prettyPrint :: Value -> IO () prettyPrint = LBS.putStrLn . encodePretty #endif

In this particular case, I'm working with some relatively large chunks of JSON and its useful to be able to pretty print them when I'm the REPL, but I have no need for that function when I compile that module into my project.

Categories: thinktime

Paul Wayper: That time that I registered an electric vehicle

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 17th Oct 2014 23:10
So, tell us a story, Uncle Paul.

Sure. One time when I was in Rovers, ...

No, tell us the story of how you got your electric motorbike registered!

Oh, okay then.

It was the 20th of February - a Friday. I'd taken the day off to get the bike registered. I'd tried to do this a couple of weeks before then, but I found out that, despite being told a month beforehand that the workload on new registrations was only a couple of days long, when I came to book it I found out that the earliest they could do was the 20th, two weeks away. So the 20th it was.

That morning I had to get the bike inspected by the engineer, get his sign-off, and take it down to the motor registry to get it inspected at 8:30AM. I also had to meet the plumber at our house, which meant I left a bit late, and by the time I was leaving the engineer it was already 8:15AM and I was in traffic. Say what you like about Canberra being a small town, but people like driving in and the traffic was a crawl. I rang the motor registry and begged for them to understand that I'd be there as soon as possible and that I might be a couple of minutes late. I squeaked into the entrance just as they were giving up hope, and they let me in because of the novelty of the bike and because I wasn't wasting their time.

The roadworthy inspection went fairly harmlessly - I didn't have a certificate from a weighbridge saying how heavy it was, but I knew it was only about eight kilos over the original bike's weight, so probably about 240 kilos? "OK, no worries," they said, scribbling that down on the form. The headlights weren't too high, the indicators worked, and there was no problem with my exhaust being too loud.

(Aside: at the inspection station there they have a wall full of pictures of particularly egregious attempts to get dodgy car builds past an inspection. Exhaust stuffed full of easily-removable steel wool? Exhausts with bit burnt patches where they've been oxy'd open and welded shut again? Panels attached with zip ties? Bolts missing? Plastic housings melted over ill-fitted turbos? These people have seen it all. Don't try to fool them.)

Then we came up to the really weird part of my dream. You know, the part where I know how to tap dance, but I can only do it while wearing golf shoes?

Er, sorry. That was something else. Then we came to the weird part of the process.

Modified vehicles have to get a compliance plate, to show that they comply with the National Code of Practice on vehicle conversions. The old process was that the engineer that inspected the vehicle to make sure it complied had blank compliance plates; when you brought the vehicle in and it passed their inspection, they then filled out all the fields on the plate, attached the plate to the vehicle, and then you transported it down to Main Roads. But that was a bit too open to people stealing compliance plates, so now they have a "better" system. What I had to do was:

  1. Get the bike inspected for road worthiness.
  2. They hand me a blank compliance plate.
  3. I then had to take it to the engineer, who told me the fields to fill in.
  4. He then told me to go to a trophy making place, where they have laser etchers that can write compliance plates beautifully.
  5. I arrive there at 11AM. They say it'll be done by about 2PM.
  6. Go and have lunch with friends. Nothing else to do.
  7. Pick etched compliance plate up.
  8. Take compliance plate back to engineer. Because he's busy, borrow a drill and a rivet gun and attach the plate to the bike myself.
  9. Take it back to Main Roads, who check that the plate is attached to the bike correctly and stamp the road worthiness form. Now I can get the bike registered.
Yeah, it's roundabout. Why not keep engrave the plates at Main Roads with the details the Engineer gives to them? But that's the system, so that's what I did.

And so I entered the waiting department. It only probably took about fifteen minutes to come up next in the queue, but it was fifteen minutes I was impatient to see go. We went through the usual hilarious dance with values:

  • Her: What are you registering?
  • Me: An electric motorbike.
  • Her: How many cylinders?
  • Me: Er... it's electric. None.
  • Her: None isn't a value I can put in.
  • Me: (rolls eyes) OK, one cylinder.
  • Her: OK. How many cubic centimetres?
Many months ago I had enquired about custom number plates, and it turns out that motorbikes can indeed have them. Indeed, I could by "3FAZE" if I wanted. For a mere $2,600 or so. It was very tempting, but when I weighed it up against getting new parts for the bike (which it turned out I would need sooner rather than later, but that's a story for another day) I thought I'd save up for another year.

So I finally picked up my new set of plates, thanked her for her time, and said "Excuse me, but I have to do this:" and then yelled:

"Yes!!!!"

Well, maybe I kept my voice down a little. But I had finally done it - after years of work, several problems, one accident, a few design changes, and lots of frustration and gradual improvement, I had an actual, registered electric motorbike I had built nearly all myself.

I still get that feeling now - I'll be riding along and I'll think, "wow, I'm actually being propelled along by a device I built myself. Look at it, all working, holding together, acting just like a real motorbike!" It feels almost like I've got away with something - a neat hack that turns out to work just as well as all those beautifully engineered mega-budget productions. I'm sure a lot of people don't notice it - it does look a bit bulky, but it's similar enough to a regular motorbike that it probably just gets overlooked as another two-wheeled terror on the roads.

Well, I'll just have to enjoy it myself then :-)

Categories: thinktime

"Let's go around the room"

Seth Godin - Fri 17th Oct 2014 20:10
If you say that in a meeting, you've failed. You've abdicated responsibility and just multiplied the time wasted by the number of people in the room. When we go around the room, everyone in the room spends the entire time...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 261: Lots of play dates with boys, TumbleTastics, and a fairy gathering

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 17th Oct 2014 19:10

Today was a typical jam packed day. Zoe had a brief wake up at at some point overnight because she couldn't find Cowie, right next to her head, but that was it.

First up, the PAG fundraising committee come over for a quick (well, more like 2 hour) meeting at my place to discuss planning for the sausage sizzle tomorrow. Because I don't have Zoe, I've volunteered to do a lot of the running around, so I'm going to have a busy day.

Mel had brought Matthew and Olivia with her, so Zoe and Matthew had a good time playing, and Olivia kept trying to join in.

That meeting ran right up until I realised we had to head off for TumbleTastics, so Zoe got ready in record time and we scootered over and made it there just as her class was starting. I was sure we were going to be late, so I was happy we made it in time.

Lachlan and his Mum, Laura, and little sister came over for lunch again afterwards, and stayed for a little while.

After they left, we started getting ready for the Fairy Nook's attempt to break the Guiness Book of Records record for the most fairies in one place. We needed to get a wand, so once Zoe was appropriately attired, we walked around the corner to Crackerjack Toys and picked up a wand.

After that, I popped up to Mel's place to collect a whole bunch of eskies that the local councillor had lent us for the sausage sizzle. Mel had also picked up a tutu for Zoe from the local two dollar store in her travels.

We got home, and then walked to the Hawthorne AFL oval where the record attempt was. Initially there were like two other fairies there, but by 4:30pm, there was a pretty good turnout. I don't know what the numbers were, but I'm pretty sure they were well under the 872 they needed. There was a jumping castle and a few of Zoe's friends from Kindergarten, so it was all good.

Sarah arrived to pick up Zoe from there, and I walked home.

Categories: thinktime

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