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Michael Fox: Ubuntu 12.04.4, TvHeadend and Realtek RTL2832U USB tuner

Planet Linux Australia - Sat 12th Apr 2014 07:04

This week I setup an old Dell Optiplex 755 tower with Ubuntu 12.04.4, TvHeadEnd and Realtek RTL2832U USB tuner to perform some DVB-T recordings. The installation I performed of TvHeadEnd is the exact same one I documented some months back when I used the same USB tuner on a Raspberry Pi. You can read about it here.

The installation was flawless and simple as you’d expect. The system has been running a few days now and capturing what I want. It also allows me to point VLC client on other machines at the system to network stream any of the DVB-T channels the tuner can tune against (also shown in the previous post linked above).

Thinking of buying another tuner to be honest, so I can record from 2 different channels that don’t share the same stream/multiplex id.

Categories: thinktime

Style Guides On Parade

a list apart - Sat 12th Apr 2014 02:04
» Style Guides On Parade

If you loved this week’s “Creating Style Guides” piece by Susan Robertson, you’ll thrill to Susan’s follow-up posting, on her personal site, of style guide links galore!

Categories: thinktime

Paul Wayper: Sitting at the feet of the Miller

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 11th Apr 2014 22:04
Today I woke nearly an hour earlier than I'm used to, and got on a plane at a barely undignified hour, to travel for over three hours to visit a good friend of mine, Peter Miller, in Gosford.

Peter may be known to my readers, so I won't be otiose in describing him merely as a programmer with great experience who's worked in the Open Source community for decades. For the last couple of years he's been battling Leukaemia, a fight which has taken its toll - not only on him physically and on his work but also on his coding output. It's a telling point for all good coders to consider that he wrote tests on his good days - so that when he was feeling barely up to it but still wanted to do some coding he could write something that could be verified as correct.

I arrived while he was getting a blood transfusion at a local hospital, and we had spent a pleasurable hour talking about good coding practices, why people don't care about how things work any more, how fascinating things that work are (ever seen inside a triple lay-shaft synchronous mesh gearbox?), how to deal with frustration and bad times, how inventions often build on one another and analogies to the open source movement, and many other topics. Once done, we went back to his place where I cooked him some toasted sandwiches and we talked about fiction, the elements of a good mystery, what we do to plan for the future, how to fix the health care system (even though it's nowhere near as broken as, say, the USA), dealing with road accidents and fear, why you can never have too much bacon, what makes a good Linux Conference, and many other things.

Finally, we got around to talking about code. I wanted to ask him about a project I've talked about before - a new library for working with files that allows the application to insert, overwrite, and delete any amount of data anywhere in the file without having to read the entire file into memory, massage it, and write it back out again. Happily for me this turned out to be something that Peter had also given thought to, apropos of talking with Andrew Cowie about text editors (which was one of my many applications for such a system). He'd also independently worked out that such a system would also allow a fairly neat and comprehensive undo and versioning system, which was something I thought would be possible - although we differed on the implementation details, I felt like I was on the right track.

We discussed how such a system would minimise on-disk reads and writes, how it could offer transparent, randomly seekable, per-block compression, how to recover from partial file corruption, and what kind of API it should offer. Then Peter's son arrived and we talked a bit about his recently completed psychology degree, why psychologists are treated the same way that scientists and programmers are at parties (i.e. like a form of social death), and how useful it is to consider human beings as individual when trying to help them. Then it was time for my train back to Sydney and on to Canberra and home.

Computing is famous, or denigrated, as an industry full of introverts, who would rather hack on code than interact with humans. Yet many of us are extroverts who don't really enjoy this mould we are forced into. We want to talk with other people - especially about code! For an extrovert like myself, having a chance to spend time with someone knowledgeable, funny, human, and sympathetic is to see sun again after long days of rain. I'm fired up to continue work on something that I thought was only an idle, personal fantasy unwanted by others.

I can only hope it means as much to Peter as it does to me.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 73: A fourth-generation friendship

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 11th Apr 2014 21:04

Oh man, am I exhausted.

I've known my friend Kim for longer than we remembered. Until Zoe was born, I thought the connection was purely that our grandmothers knew each other. After Zoe was born, and we gave her my birth mother's name as her middle name, Kim's mother sent me a message indicating that she knew my mother. More on that in a moment.

Kim and I must have interacted when we were small, because it predates my memory of her. My earliest memories are of being a pen pal with her when she lived in Kingaroy. She had a stint in South Carolina, and then in my late high school years, she moved relatively close to me, at Albany Creek, and we got to have a small amount of actual physical contact.

Then I moved to Canberra, and she moved to Melbourne, and it was only due to the wonders of Facebook that we reconnected while I was in the US.

Fast forward many years, and we're finally all back in Brisbane again. Kim is married and has a daughter named Sarah who is a couple of years older than Zoe, and could actually pass of as her older sister. She also has as a younger son. Since we've been back in Brisbane, we've had many a play date at each other's homes, and the girls get along famously, to the point where Sarah was talking about her "best friend Zoe" at show and tell at school.

The other thing I learned since reconnecting with Kim in the past year, is that Kim's aunt and my mother were in the same grade at school. Kim actually arranged for me to have a coffee with her aunt when she was visiting from Canberra, and she told me a bunch of stuff about my Mum that I didn't know, so that was really nice.

Kim works from home part time, and I offered to look after Sarah for a day in the school holidays as an alternative to her having to go to PCYC holiday care. Today was that day.

I picked up Zoe from Sarah this morning, as it was roughly in the same direction as Kim's place, and made more sense, and we headed over to Kim's place to pick up Sarah. We arrived only a couple of minutes later than the preferred pick up time, so I was pretty happy with how that worked out.

The plan was to bring Sarah back to our place, and then head over to New Farm Park on the CityCat and have a picnic lunch and a play in the rather fantastic playground in the park over there.

I hadn't made Zoe's lunch prior to leaving the house, so after we got back home again, I let the girls have a play while I made Zoe's lunch. After some play with Marble Run, the girls started doing some craft activity all on their own on the balcony. It was cute watching them try to copy what each other were making. One of them tried gluing two paper cups together by the narrow end. It didn't work terribly well because there wasn't a lot of surface to come into contact with each other.

I helped the girls with their craft activity briefly, and then we left on foot to walk to the CityCat terminal. Along the way, I picked up some lunch for myself at the Hawthorne Garage and added it to the small Esky I was carrying with Zoe's lunchbox in it. It was a beautiful day for a picnic. It was warm and clear. I think Sarah found the walk a bit long, but we made it to the ferry terminal relatively incident free. We got lucky, and a ferry was just arriving, and as it happened, they had to change boats, as they do from time to time at Hawthorne, so we would have had plenty of time regardless, as everyone had to get off one boat and onto a new one.

We had a late morning tea at the New Farm Park ferry terminal after we got off, and then headed over to the playground. I claimed a shady spot with our picnic blanket and the girls did their thing.

I alternated between closely shadowing them around the playground and letting them run off on their own. Fortunately they stuck together, so that made keeping track of them slightly easier.

For whatever reason, Zoe was in a bit of a grumpier mood than normal today, and wasn't taking too kindly to the amount of turn taking that was necessary to have a smoothly oiled operation. Sarah (justifiably) got a bit whiny when she didn't get an equitable amount of time getting the call the shots on what the they did, but aside from that they got along fine.

There was another great climbing tree, which had kids hanging off it all over the place. Both girls wanted to climb it, but needed a little bit of help getting started. Sarah lost her nerve before Zoe did, but even Zoe was a surprisingly trepidatious about it, and after shimmying a short distance along a good (but high) branch, wanted to get down.

The other popular activity was a particularly large rope "spider web" climbing frame, which Sarah was very adept at scaling. It was a tad too big for Zoe to manage though, and she couldn't keep up, which frustrated her quite a bit. I was particularly proud of how many times she returned to it to try again, though.

We had our lunch, a little more play time, and the obligatory ice cream. I'd contemplated catching the CityCat further up-river to Sydney Street to then catching the free CityHopper ferry, but the thought of then trying to get two very tired girls to walk from the Hawthorne ferry terminal back home didn't really appeal to me all that much, so I decided to just head back home.

That ended up being a pretty good call, because as it was, trying to get the two of them back home was like herding cats. Sarah was fine, but Zoe was really dragging the chain and getting particularly grumpy. I had to deploy every positive parenting trick that I currently have in my book to keep Zoe moving, but we got there eventually. Fortunately we didn't have any particularly deadline.

The girls did some more playing at home while I collapsed on the couch for a bit, and then wanted to do some more craft. We made a couple of crowns and hot-glued lots of bling onto them.

We drove back to Kim's place after that, and the girls played some more there. Sarah nearly nodded off on the way home. Zoe was surprisingly chipper. The dynamic changed completely once we were back at Sarah's house. Zoe seemed fine to take Sarah's direction on everything, so I wonder how much of things in the morning were territorial, and Sarah wasn't used to Zoe calling the shots when she was at Zoe's place.

Kim invited us to stay for dinner. I wasn't really feeling like cooking, and the girls were having a good time, so I decided to stay for dinner, and after they had a bath together we headed home. Zoe stayed awake all the way home, and went to bed without any fuss.

It's pretty hot tonight, and I'm trialling Zoe sleeping without white noise, so we'll see how tonight pans out.

Categories: thinktime

Thinking lifetime (don't break the chain)

Seth Godin - Fri 11th Apr 2014 19:04
The traveling salesman, the carnival barker and the old-time businessman can hit and run. Make the sale, cut your costs, move on. Today, though, in the connection economy, two huge factors are at work: 1. Subscription. The lifetime value of...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Colin Charles: Korean MySQL Power User Group

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 11th Apr 2014 17:04

If you are a MySQL power user in Korea, its well worth joining the Korean MySQL Power User Group. This is a group led by senior DBAs at many Korean companies. From what I gather, there is experience there using MySQL, MariaDB, Percona Server and Galera Cluster (many on various 5.5, some on 5.6, and quite a few testing 10.0). No one is using WebScaleSQL (yet?). The discussion group is rather active, and I’ve got a profile there (I get questions translated for me).

This is just a natural evolution of the DBA Dinners that were held once every quarter. Organised by OSS Korea, and sometimes funded by SkySQL, people would eat & drink, while hearing a short message about updates in the MySQL world (usually by me, but we’ve had special guests like Werner Vogels, CTO Amazon; recently we’ve seen appearances by Monty, Patrik Sallner, Michael Carney where mostly all we do then is eat & drink).

So from meetups to getting information online, in a quick fashion. Much hunger for open source in Korea, very smart people working there on services feeding the population (where some even make it outside of the local market). The future of open source in Korea is definitely very bright.

Related posts:

  1. Book in Korean: Real MariaDB
  2. Change in Affiliation
  3. The MySQL Mugshot Group
Categories: thinktime

Research insights into lung diseases focus of new centre

Teaser:  Researchers at the University of Melbourne have discovered a new insight into the unexplained link between lung infections, emphysema and lung cancer.

This article was originally published in The Melbourne Newsroom on April 11. View the article here.

Coinciding with the launch of a dedicated Lung Health Research Centre, researchers at the University of Melbourne have discovered a new insight into the unexplained link between lung infections, emphysema and lung cancer.

read more

Categories: thinktime

Colin Charles: Amazon EC2 Linux AMIs

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 11th Apr 2014 01:04

If you use Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), you are always given choices of AMIs (by default; there are plenty of other AMIs available for your base-os): Amazon Linux AMI, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, SUSE Enterprise Server and Ubuntu. In terms of cost, the Amazon Linux AMI is the cheapest, followed by SUSE then RHEL. 

I use EC2 a lot for testing, and recently had to pay a “RHEL tax” as I needed to run a RHEL environment. For most uses I’m sure you can be satisfied by the Amazon Linux AMI. The last numbers suggest Amazon Linux is #2 in terms of usage on EC2.

Anyway, recently Amazon Linux AMI came out with the 2014.03 release (see release notes). You can install MySQL 5.1.73 or MySQL 5.5.36 (the latter makes the most sense today) easily without additional repositories.

The most interesting part of the release notes though? When the 2014.09 release comes out, it would mark 3 years since they’ve gone GA with the Amazon Linux AMI. They are likely to remove MySQL 5.1 (its old and deprecated upstream). And:

We are considering switching from MySQL to MariaDB.

This should be interesting going forward. MariaDB in the EC2 AMI would be a welcome addition naturally. I do wonder if the choice will be offered in RDS too. I will be watching the forums closely

Related posts:

  1. A Storage Engine for Amazon S3
  2. Some MariaDB related news from the Red Hat front
  3. MariaDB & distributions update, Dec 2013
Categories: thinktime

Matt Griffin on How We Work: My Life with Email

a list apart - Thu 10th Apr 2014 22:04

I’d like to take a moment to address something decidedly unsexy. We all do it. And it’s never pretty. You guessed it: I’m talking about email.

No, I don’t mean responsive design approaches for email newsletter templates. Nope. Not even that much fun. I’m talking about reading and responding to that everyday, humdrum, never-ending stream of communication that flows through the inscrutable ether to your very own inbox.

Staying in control of your life with email is a challenge (look no further than your friends’ triumphant cries of “inbox zero!”). When you run your own business, as I do, there is every motivation to always stay on top of these messages. It is, after all, your thing. You own it. Shouldn’t you be addressing every issue as it crops up, and responding with lightning speed?

This lifestyle really caught up with me a year or so ago. It was affecting my sleep and productivity, and saddling me with all kinds of extra cognitive overhead. It was no fun at all. Over the course of several months, I worked at establishing rules and procedures for email that helped me regain my sanity and improve the quality of my workdays (not to mention my weekends). In no particular order, here they are:

We don’t need no stinking badges

One of the first and most obvious things I did was turn off notifications and badges for email. Turning on email notifications is like asking to be interrupted by anyone at any time, no matter what you’re doing. If you must have notifications, consider adding essential people to a VIP list, and hiding all other notifications. Ask yourself, “who would I need to drop everything for, no matter how important my task is at that moment?”

Filters, filters, filters

OMG, filters, guys! Filters that route the endless stream of notifications (for instance Basecamp updates, or emails from your ticketing system) are great. They keep things organized neatly so that you can address like emails all at once. Since these sorts of emails will often be project-specific—this also makes it easier to remember to track your time while you’re doing it (hint, hint).

More apps!

On the weekend, I really don’t want to accidentally open a troublesome work email. To keep a clear distinction between my personal and work emails, I started using a separate app for personal email. Personally, I’m quite happy with Mailbox, but I also know some smart folks who like Boxer. I’m sure there are plenty of other great ones, too (reader comments, activate!).

Say when

Just like the ticket queue of tasks, you’re never really finished answering emails. To help me focus on my home life when I’m not at work, I use a timed “do not disturb” setting in iOS to make sure that I get no notifications of anything between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m.

Save your brainpower

I find that my mind is sharpest and I do my best work in the morning, and yet I used to start each work day with email—a task that arguably requires the least of my creativity and mental acuity. So now I set aside the first hour of my day for something challenging. I often write these columns during that time slot. Or tackle a particularly gnarly IA or design problem. But email? Email can wait till 10 a.m.

It’s all in the timing

And when you’ve finished that batch of email responses and are ready to return to your work? Close that email client, friend! Don’t open it back up until you’re ready to dedicate your attention to it again. Otherwise, it’s just a distraction. I find it useful to set times for checking my email throughout the day, for instance 10 a.m., 1:30 p.m., and 4 p.m.

Inaction leads to rumination

Ever check your email while you only have a few seconds or minutes to spare? You get some troublesome message, but don’t really have time to read through it carefully or respond. Then you spend the next few hours with that static buzzing around your brain, distracting from whatever it is you’re working on. I now have a simple rule: if I don’t have time to sit down and directly address whatever messages may be waiting for me, I don’t check my email. Making reading and responding to email a dedicated task keeps you out of that vague cognitive limbo, and can reduce the anxiety of opening the inbox.

Expectations for the medium

Remember: email is asynchronous communication. By its nature, it encourages a lag in response, and everyone expects that. If there’s a real emergency, someone will doubtless pick up a phone. Email can wait a few hours, even a day. The world won’t explode, and you won’t get fired. Give those messages their proper place in the hierarchy of your day.

And on and on

There are doubtless many other ways to keep the great beast email under control. These are the ones that have helped me hold on to my sanity and reduce email-induced anxiety. These little strategies make me happier and more productive every day.

How about you? What are your email troubles? What have you tried that’s worked? Get in those comments, people, and share what you’ve learned. Something tells me we could all use a little help in this department.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 72: The Workshops, and zip lining into a pool

Planet Linux Australia - Thu 10th Apr 2014 22:04

Today was jam packed, from the time Zoe got dropped off to the time she was picked up again.

I woke up early to go to my yoga class. It had moved from 6:15am to 6:00am, but was closer to home. I woke up a bunch of times overnight because I wanted to make sure I got up a little bit earlier (even though I had an alarm set) so I was a bit tired.

Sarah dropped Zoe off, and we quickly inspected our plaster fish from yesterday. Because the plaster had gotten fairly thick, it didn't end up filling the molds completely, so the fish weren't smooth. Zoe was thrilled with them nonetheless, and wanted to draw all over them.

After that, we jumped in the car to head out to The Workshops Rail Museum. We were meeting Megan there.

We arrived slightly after opening time. I bought an annual membership last time we were there, and I'm glad we did. The place is pretty good. It's all indoors, and it's only lightly patronised, even for school holidays, so it was nice and quiet.

Megan and her Dad and sister arrived about an hour later, which was good, because it gave Zoe and I a bit of time to ourselves. We had plenty of time on the diesel engine simulator without anyone else breathing down our neck wanting a turn.

The girls all had a good time. We lost Megan and Zoe for a little bit when they decided to take off and look at some trains on their own. Jason and I were frantically searching the place before I found them.

There was a puppet show at 11am, and the room it was in was packed, so we plonked all three kids down on the floor near the stage, and waited outside. That was really nice, because the kids were all totally engrossed, and didn't miss us at all.

After lunch and a miniature train ride we headed home. Surprisingly, Zoe didn't nap on the way home.

Jason was house sitting for some of his neighbours down the street, and he'd invited us to come over and use their pool, so we went around there once we got back home. The house was great. They also had a couple of chickens.

The pool was really well set up. It had a zip line that ran the length of the pool. Zoe was keen to give it a try, and she did really well, hanging on all the way. They also had a little plastic fort with a slippery slide that could be placed at the end of the pool, and the girls had a great time sliding into the pool that way.

We got back home from all of that fun and games about 15 minutes before Sarah arrived to pick Zoe up, so it was really non-stop day.

Categories: thinktime

You are not the lowest common denominator

Seth Godin - Thu 10th Apr 2014 19:04
Internet companies often strive for lock in. Lock in is what happens once you have a lot of followers on Twitter... it's not easy to switch. Same with all social networks. And operating systems too--it takes a lot of hassle...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

The neurobiology of subjective experiences - from colour to beauty

Location The Auditorium, The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity Ground Floor, 792 Elizabeth Street The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 Australia See map: Google Maps Professor Semir Zeki FRS 6 May 2014 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm Professor Zeki will outline what is known today about the neurobiology underlying our experience of colour on the one hand and our experience of beauty – regardless of its source – on the other.

Professor Semir Zeki FRS
Professor of Neuroesthetics University College London

Professor Zeki is a world leader in the elucidation of the neuroscience of colour vision, and the relation to beauty in art, music and mathematics.
His many activities have included Editor of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society (B) (1997-2004), and member of the National Science Council of France (1998-2002).

read more

Categories: thinktime

Forging iron women

Teaser:  A new University of Melbourne study has found that women who take iron supplements experience a marked improvement in their exercise performance.

This article was originally published in The Melbourne Newsroom on April 9. View the article here.

A new University of Melbourne study has found that women who take iron supplements experience a marked improvement in their exercise performance.

Published in the Journal of Nutrition, researchers undertook a systematic review and analysis of the effect of iron supplementation to the exercise performance of women in child-bearing years.

read more

Categories: thinktime

Easy Color Contrast Testing

a list apart - Wed 09th Apr 2014 22:04

We have plenty of considerations to design for when crafting web sites. Web accessibility is not a new design consideration, but is still very important, no matter the size or speed of device we’re testing on. The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) tells us our content should be distinguishable and requires we “[m]ake it easier for users to see and hear content including separating foreground from background.”

We know that our color contrast ratio should be 3:1 for non-decorative text, sized larger than 18-point or larger than 14-point if bold. Text smaller than that should meet a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1.

Maybe you have amazing eyeballs that can help you recognize contrast levels. If, like me, you do not have magical corneal calculators, then you probably have utilized one of the tools out there to check contrast, such as: WebAIM’s color contrast checker, Snook’s contrast slider, Check my colors URL input check, or a WCAG checker add-on for Firefox.

I recently switched to using Chrome’s Accessibility Developer Tools built in contrast checker and I love it. Take a look at the audits being run by the tools and let’s look at how to begin using it once installed.

Load up the website you’d like to check and bring up the Developer Tools. I’ll pick on myself and use my own site for this example. Once open, click over to the “Audits” tab and make sure “Accessibility” is checked. Click “Run”.

Expand the “Text elements should have a reasonable contrast ratio” section. This will show you the HTML of the elements that don’t have sufficient contrast. Identify one to examine further.

Select the chosen offender in the browser and inspect it. If you can’t see the contrast values, use the menu to pull up the “Accessibility Properties.” You’ll see the current contrast ratio of your element. You’ll also see a suggested color value pair to match the WCAG AA or AAA recommendation. Select the swatch to the right of those values to see the preview of that change. In this case, we’ll see what grey we’d have to adjust our background to in order to keep the white text.

As you can see in this second example, I could make the date text darker to meet the guidelines, which is very helpful in making a fast change.

When it’s this quick and simple to check contrast, there’s no reason not to add this accessibility test into our workflow.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 71: Tumble Tastics trial, painting and plaster fun

Planet Linux Australia - Wed 09th Apr 2014 21:04

Zoe slept in even later this morning. I'm liking this colder weather. We had nothing particular happening first thing today, so we just snuggled in bed for a bit before we got started.

Tumble Tastics were offering free trial classes this week, so I signed Zoe up for one today. She really enjoyed going to Gold Star Gymnastics in the US, and has asked me about finding a gym class over here every now and then.

Tumble Tastics is a much smaller affair than Gold Star, but at 300 metres from home on foot, it's awesomely convenient. Zoe scootered there this morning.

It seems to be physically part of what I'm guessing used to be the Church of Christ's church hall, so it's not big at all, but the room that Zoe had her class in still had plenty of equipment in it. There were 8 kids in her class, all about her size. I peeked around the door and watched.

Most of the class was instructor led and mainly mat work, but then part way through, the parents were invited in, and the teacher walked us all through a course around the room, using the various equipment, and the parents had to spot for their kids.

The one thing that cracked me up was when the kids were supposed to be tucking into a ball and rocking on their backs. Zoe instead did a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu break-fall and fell backwards slapping the mat instead. It was good to see that some of what she learned in those classes has kicked in reflexively.

She really enjoyed the rope swing and hanging upside down on the uneven bars.

The class ran for 50 minutes (I was only expecting it to last 30 minutes) and Zoe did really well straight off. I think we'll make this her 4th term extra-curricular activity.

We scootered home the longer way, because we were in no particular hurry. Zoe did some painting when we got home, and then we had lunch.

After lunch we goofed off for a little bit, and then we did quiet time. Zoe napped for about two and a half hours, and then we did some plaster play.

I'd picked up a fish ice cube tray from IKEA on the weekend for 99 cents (queue Thrift Shop), and I bought a bag of plaster of Paris a while back, but haven't had a chance to do anything with it yet. I bribed Zoe into doing quiet time by telling her we'd do something new with the ice cube tray I'd bought.

We mixed up a few paper cups with plaster of Paris in them and then I squirted some paint in. I'm not sure if the paint caused a reaction, or the plaster was already starting to set by the time the paint got mixed in, but it became quite viscous as soon as the paint was mixed in. We did three different colours and used tongue depressers to jam it into the tray. Zoe seemed to twig that it was the same stuff as the impressions of her baby feet, which I thought was a pretty clever connection to make.

After that, there was barely enough time to watch a tiny bit of TV before Sarah arrived to pick Zoe up. I told her that her plaster would be set by the time she got dropped off in the morning.

I procrastinated past the point of no return and didn't go for a run. Instead I decided to go out to Officeworks and print out some photos to stick in the photo frame I bought from IKEA on the weekend.

Categories: thinktime

Colin Charles: Book in Korean: Real MariaDB

Planet Linux Australia - Wed 09th Apr 2014 21:04

For some months now, there have been some back & forth emails with Matt, one of the senior DBAs behind the popular messaging service, KakaoTalk (yes, they are powered by MariaDB). Today I got some positive information: the book published entirely in the Korean language, titled Real MariaDB is now available.

It covers MariaDB 10.0. Where appropriate, there are also notes on MySQL 5.6 (especially with regards to differences). This is Matt’s fourth MySQL-related book, and there’s a community around it as well. The foreword is written by Monty and I.

If you’re reading the Korean language, this is the manual to read. It should push MariaDB further in this market, and the content is relatively quite advanced covering a lot of optimization explanations, configuration options, etc. At 628 pages, it is much, much better than the Korean translation of the Knowledge base!

Related posts:

  1. Book: MariaDB Crash Course
  2. MariaDB 5.1.44 released
  3. MariaDB 5.1.42 released!
Categories: thinktime

The string with an idea at the end

Seth Godin - Wed 09th Apr 2014 19:04
Ideas used to be nicely wrapped up, wrapped in movies or books or some other sort of container. The Harvard Business Review and Fast Company would collect a bunch of them in one handy, easy to carry package. And the...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

TasLUG: Hobart April Talk: The open-source graphics train wreck

Planet Linux Australia - Wed 09th Apr 2014 18:04
Welcome to April already! Last month's talk on OpenDCP had a great reception, and I hope you're all not too busy getting new keys after that OpenSSL Heatbleed vulnerability.



NOTE: for this month only, TasLUG in will be meeting in the downstairs room at SoHo rather than upstairs.



When: Thursday, April 17th, 18:00 for an 18:30 start

Where: DOWNSTAIRS, Hotel Soho, 124 Davey St, Hobart. (Map)



Agenda:



  • 18:00 - early mingle, chin wagging, etc
  • 18:30 - Question and answer session, News of Note.


  • 19:00 - Mathew Oakes - The open-source graphics train wreck



    train wreck

    1.

    a chaotic or disastrous situation that holds a peculiar fascination for observers.

    "his train wreck of a private life guaranteed front-page treatment"



  • 20:00 - Meeting end. Dinner and drinks are available at the venue during the meeting.




We will probably get to a discussion on the Hobart LCA 2017 bid, ideas for upcoming Software Freedom Day in September, the Statewide meetup, Committee nomination and voting, so our pre-talk discussion should be packed full of jam.

Note for May: There will be no Hobart meeting next month in May - instead we should all be heading to our statewide meetup at Ross! If you need a lift, contact one of us on the mailing list or IRC so many of us can get along and bring your open source stuff to show off!





Also in April:

26th - Launceston meeting

May:

24th - Statewide Meet-up - Ross Town Hall

June:

19th - Hobart: No talk scheduled, idea being thrown about to make it an OpenStack short talk night.

July:

11-13th - Gov Hack 2014 - There's at least a Hobart venue for this event.

September:

20th - Software Freedom Day - events in Hobart and Launceston

Categories: thinktime

The Heartbleed Bug (or: You Should Consider SSL Unsafe for a While)

a list apart - Wed 09th Apr 2014 05:04

If you run a server that uses SSL and the OpenSSL library, you need to update it. If you regularly visit a site that uses SSL (and I can’t imagine you don’t), you should try to limit your visits today. Once the dust has settled, we should all change our passwords. Pretty much everywhere.

In short, yesterday the OpenSSL Project released an update that addresses a vulnerability in the OpenSSL library. Officially named CVE-2014-0160, the Heartbleed bug has been around—and un-identified—for a long time. It’s not known if the vulnerability has been exploited, but it’s theoretically possible that someone has been snooping on transmissions we thought were secure. It’s very likely that bad guys are snooping on un-patched servers now, so be careful which services you log in to today.

Visit Heartbleed.com for a lot more information, and anyone running a server should consider these words from Cody Sorland:

Ubuntu servers running nginx/SSL? sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade sudo restart nginx Do it now. #heartbleed

— Cody Soyland (@codysoyland) April 8, 2014

Be careful out there.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 70: Visiting relatives and home visiting doctors

Planet Linux Australia - Tue 08th Apr 2014 22:04

Zoe did indeed sleep in this morning, by a whole 30 minutes. It was nice. She seemed no worse for wear for her lip injury, and it was looking better this morning.

Wow, "bimonthly" is ambiguous. I had my "every two month" in person co-parenting sync up lunch with Sarah today. Phew, that was a mouthful. Anyway, I had that today, and normally that would fall on a Kindergarten day, but it's school holidays. So we paid grandma and grandpa a visit, and they looked after Zoe for me so I could make the meeting.

Mum and Dad have been away on a driving holiday, so Zoe hasn't seen them for a while, and it's been even longer since we've been to their house. She really loves going to their house because it's big, with a big back yard with a swing set. There's all sorts of exciting things like grandpa's worm farm, a sand pit, a china tea set, a piano, a tricycle and remote controlled cars. Zoe basically just works her way around the house entertaining herself. It's great. I usually get to put my feet up and read the newspaper.

After I got back from my lunch meeting, we headed over to Greenslopes Private Hospital to visit my cousin, who's just had major surgery. On the way, Zoe napped in the car. I made a brief side trip to clear my post office box along the way.

Amusingly, Zoe wakes up from short naps in the car way better than at Kindergarten. I don't know if it has anything to do with the quality of sleep she's getting or what it is, but I easily woke her up and extracted her from the car when we arrived at the hospital. No meltdowns. And that's pretty typical of car naps.

I've had a discomfort in my right ear for the last couple of days, and it grew into increasing pain throughout the day today. It got to the point where, while I was driving home, that I deciding to get it looked at by a doctor, ASAP. One of my favourite things about being back in Australia is the availability of home visiting doctors.

It was actually faster and cheaper for me to get a home doctor out to look at me tonight than it was to get an appointment with my regular doctor. I wouldn't have gotten an appointment until some time tomorrow at the earliest (assuming he had appointments available), because I made the decision to see a doctor after 5pm, when they'd closed. Instead, I had a doctor at my door in a little more than 2 hours of making the request. It also worked out cheaper, because the home doctor bulk bills Medicare, whereas my regular doctor does not.

Add in the massive convenience of not having to lug a small child anywhere while I get seen by a doctor, and it's a major convenience. I love socialised healthcare.

It turned out I have an outer ear infection. So all we had to do after the doctor came was find a pharmacy that was still open after 7pm to get my ear drop prescription filled.

All of that mucking around meant that Zoe got to bed a little later than usual. It's another cool night tonight, so I'm hoping she'll sleep well and have another sleep in.

Categories: thinktime

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