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"How do I get rid of the fear?"

Seth Godin - Sun 20th Apr 2014 19:04
Alas, this is the wrong question. The only way to get rid of the fear is to stop doing things that might not work, to stop putting yourself out there, to stop doing work that matters. No, the right question...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Russell Coker: Sociological Images 2012

Planet Linux Australia - Sun 20th Apr 2014 12:04

In 2011 I wrote a post that was inspired by the Sociological Images blog [1]. After some delay here I’ve written another one. I plan to continue documenting such things.

Playground

In 2011 I photographed a plaque at Flagstaff Gardens in Melbourne. It shows a picture of the playground in 1918 with segregated boys and girls sections. It’s interesting that the only difference between the two sections is that the boys have horizontal bars and a trapeze. Do they still have gender segregated playgrounds anywhere in Australia? If so what is the difference in the sections?

Aborigines

The Android game Paradise Island [2] has a feature where you are supposed to stop Aborigines from stealing, it plays on the old racist stereotypes about Aborigines which are used to hide the historical record that it’s always been white people stealing from the people that they colonise.

There is also another picture showing the grass skirts. Nowadays the vast majority of Aborigines don’t wear such clothing, the only time they do is when doing some sort of historical presentation for tourists.

I took those pictures in 2012, but apparently the game hasn’t changed much since then.

Lemonade

Is lemonade a drink or a flavour? Most people at the party where I took the above photo regard lemonade as a drink and found the phrase “Lemonade Flavoured Soft Drink” strange when it was pointed out to them. Incidentally the drink on the right tastes a bit like the US version of lemonade (which is quite different from the Australian version). For US readers, the convention in Australia is that “lemonade” has no flavor of lemons.

Not Sweet

In 2012 an apple cider company made a huge advertising campaign featuring people who might be gender queer, above is a picture of a bus stop poster and there were also TV ads. The adverts gave no information at all about what the drink might taste like apart from not being “as sweet as you think”. So it’s basically an advertising campaign with no substance other than a joke about people who don’t conform to gender norms.

Also it should be noted that some women naturally grow beards and have religious reasons for not shaving [3].

Episode 2 of the TV documentary series “Am I Normal” has an interesting interview of a woman with a beard.

Revolution

A violent political revolution is usually a bad thing, using such revolutions to advertise sugar drinks seems like a bad idea. But it seems particularly interesting to note the different attitudes to such things in various countries. In 2012 Schweppes in Australia ran a marketing campaign based on imagery related to a Communist revolution (the above photo was taken at Southern Cross station in Melbourne), I presume that Schweppes in the US didn’t run that campaign. I wonder whether global media will stop such things, presumably that campaign has the potential to do more harm in the US than good in Australia.

Racist Penis Size Joke at Southbank

The above advert was in a free newspaper at Southbank in 2012. Mini Movers thought that this advert was a good idea and so did the management of Southbank who approved the advert for their paper. Australia is so racist that people don’t even realise they are being racist.

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  3. Links July 2012 The New York Times has an interesting article about “hacker...
Categories: thinktime

Arjen Lentz: Dolphins In The Blue-2 (Finally!)

Planet Linux Australia - Sun 20th Apr 2014 12:04

2

 

I started to swim away as fast as I could when I heard a sad, scared and quiet voice, ‘wait,’ I squeaked in relief, I saw that the shadow was only a seal. ‘ Sorry for startling you, I suppose you can’t get to sleep either?’ It asked ‘no, yes, well, lets just say that I can’t sleep easily.’ I replied. The seal seemed to be happier about this and asked ‘what’s your name anyway?’ ‘Apollo and yours?’ I asked ‘Pearl, and do you know what makes you say OI?’ ‘no wha-?’ but I never finished the question because Pearl smacked me playfully on the flipper and raced off ‘OI!’ I squealed. I swam after her trying not to click too loudly and using my echolocation. Pearl was using her excellent hearing and her sensitive whiskers to make sure I didn’t get too close.

In the end I ended up clicking, ‘ok, ok I agree and give up ok? Oh and Pearl, could you come with me to sleep with my pod? I will be pretty lonely without you.’ ‘Sure and… could you introduce me to your friends?’ she asked, ‘sure,’ I replied and with that we swam side by side back to where the pod was. When we got back we swam a quietly as we could back to where I was sleeping before. In moments I fell asleep, surprisingly, probably because of all the rushing around.

The next day came too soon and when I got shaken awake from Flipper I was confused and tired. ‘Wha? Wait, no, give me five more minutes Mum…’ I murmured, ‘wake UP Apollo, you’ve been asleep for half of the day already!’ Clicked Flipper loudly, that was when I squealed, ‘WHAT!? HALF THE DAY!?’ and woke up completely.

 

We had been swimming with the pod for two hours when we felt vibrations in the water. ‘Uhh Mum… what‘s happening? I’m scared’ clicked, ‘that‘s just a boat, don’t worry. Tell you what, how about we go ask Slash if we can do some bow riding?’ She replied ‘Yeah sure, but one question what is bow riding?’ but she never really answered my question because Slash swam over to us and said, ‘did I hear you two talking about bow riding? What a great idea!’ and he clicked without waiting for an answer and called a meeting right then and there.

 

Soon the whole pod were swimming towards the boat ,which ended up to be a cruise boat, all excited of the thought of going bow riding. We got there faster than I thought we would and everyone rushed forwards to the front of the boat and I followed hesitantly not knowing what to do. I soon found out though because everyone was jumping out of the water with the wave and I joined in and found out it was really easy and fun! ‘Wee!’ I squealed for about the hundredth time with Bubs and Flip on either side of me. I slowed down and looked up at the humans and they looked back at me with grins on their faces. ‘Come in, the water’s great!’ I squealed to them, even though I knew they couldn’t understand me.

 

One girl smiled and nodded at me as though she understood me though, she said something to her mum in human language and her mum looked thoughtful. Then they walked up the boat with me following them, the girl was looking at me all the while.

 

We soon reached where they were going and the mum walked over to this person with a hat saying “captain” on it, whatever that means. The mother talked to him and he nodded to her and the girl seemed really happy and ran somewhere else on the boat where I couldn’t see. The girl soon came back wearing something black with polka dots which I assume they use to be like us and swim. She got lowered down a ladder and as soon as the other kids saw what was happening they ran off too.

 

In no time at all there was a lot of kids in the water all trying to keep up with us so we had a bit of fun by going close to them and darting off again. It was so funny to see them swimming really slowly trying to catch us. The girl that first got in seemed to stick as close to me as she could. Somehow she got to me and she looked at my dorsal fin in surprise so I turned around and saw, for the first time, that I had a scar running all the way down it in the shape of an ‘A’.

 

I turned around in the water twice before remembering along time ago, when I was younger, playing with a sharp rock and batted it with my tail and then a lot of pain in my dorsal fin. I squealed loudly in surprise and the girl laughed. I looked closer on her swimsuit thing and saw that it had her name on it, well at least I think it was her name and I read Genevieve in yellow. She smiled at me and started swimming towards me muttering things in her human language.

 

I’m not sure what she said but she seemed to be trying to calm me down. She was coming closer to me so I darted away ready to play, but, Genevieve seemed to get sad so I slowly swam towards her and she smiled again. I dived under her and she squealed with excitement. I came back up again and splashed her. She splashed me back and soon we were having a water fight.

 

Soon mum came and immediately I knew it was time to go. I didn’t want to so I hid behind the human girl. ‘Come on now Apollo it’s time to go,’ she clicked, ‘aww but I was playing with this human…’ I clicked back. ‘Come Apollo, now! No excuses.’ She said, so, of course, I followed her back to the pod but not before I nudged Genevieve a “bye” hug.

 

As I looked at the sunset, I saw the boat disappear into the distance, and, as I settled down to sleep, I wondered if i would ever see the human girl again.

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Categories: thinktime

Saying 'thank you' in public, three times

Seth Godin - Sun 20th Apr 2014 03:04
Earlier this year, I launched two ongoing classes on Skillshare: One is on the thinking necessary to invent and launch a new business and the other is for marketers of all kinds. I'm grateful to everyone who has posted a...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

They're your words, choose them

Seth Godin - Sat 19th Apr 2014 19:04
You've seen the signs: ABSOLUTELY NO CREDIT CARDS. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR LOST OR STOLEN ITEMS. BATHROOMS FOR PATRONS ONLY. Guess what? There's no legal requirement that signs have to make you sound like a harsh jerk in order to carry...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Russell Coker: Swap Space and SSD

Planet Linux Australia - Sat 19th Apr 2014 15:04

In 2007 I wrote a blog post about swap space [1]. The main point of that article was to debunk the claim that Linux needs a swap space twice as large as main memory (in summary such advice is based on BSD Unix systems and has never applied to Linux and that most storage devices aren’t fast enough for large swap). That post was picked up by Barrapunto (Spanish Slashdot) and became one of the most popular posts I’ve written [2].

In the past 7 years things have changed. Back then 2G of RAM was still a reasonable amount and 4G was a lot for a desktop system or laptop. Now there are even phones with 3G of RAM, 4G is about the minimum for any new desktop or laptop, and desktop/laptop systems with 16G aren’t that uncommon. Another significant development is the use of SSDs which dramatically improve speed for some operations (mainly seeks).

As SATA SSDs for desktop use start at about $110 I think it’s safe to assume that everyone who wants a fast desktop system has one. As a major limiting factor in swap use is the seek performance of the storage the use of SSDs should allow greater swap use. My main desktop system has 4G of RAM (it’s an older Intel 64bit system and doesn’t support more) and has 4G of swap space on an Intel SSD. My work flow involves having dozens of Chromium tabs open at the same time, usually performance starts to drop when I get to about 3.5G of swap in use.

While SSD generally has excellent random IO performance the contiguous IO performance often isn’t much better than hard drives. My Intel SSDSC2CT12 300i 128G can do over 5000 random seeks per second but for sustained contiguous filesystem IO can only do 225M/s for writes and 274M/s for reads. The contiguous IO performance is less than twice as good as a cheap 3TB SATA disk. It also seems that the performance of SSDs aren’t as consistent as that of hard drives, when a hard drive delivers a certain level of performance then it can generally do so 24*7 but a SSD will sometimes reduce performance to move blocks around (the erase block size is usually a lot larger than the filesystem block size).

It’s obvious that SSDs allow significantly better swap performance and therefore make it viable to run a system with more swap in use but that doesn’t allow unlimited swap. Even when using programs like Chromium (which seems to allocate huge amounts of RAM that aren’t used much) it doesn’t seem viable to have swap be much bigger than 4G on a system with 4G of RAM. Now I could buy another SSD and use two swap spaces for double the overall throughput (which would still be cheaper than buying a PC that supports 8G of RAM), but that still wouldn’t solve all problems.

One issue I have been having on occasion is BTRFS failing to allocate kernel memory when managing snapshots. I’m not sure if this would be solved by adding more RAM as it could be an issue of RAM fragmentation – I won’t file a bug report about this until some of the other BTRFS bugs are fixed. Another problem I have had is when running Minecraft the driver for my ATI video card fails to allocate contiguous kernel memory, this is one that almost certainly wouldn’t be solved by just adding more swap – but might be solved if I tweaked the kernel to be more aggressive about swapping out data.

In 2007 when using hard drives for swap I found that the maximum space that could be used with reasonable performance for typical desktop operations was something less than 2G. Now with a SSD the limit for usable swap seems to be something like 4G on a system with 4G of RAM. On a system with only 2G of RAM that might allow the system to be usable with swap being twice as large as RAM, but with the amounts of RAM in modern PCs it seems that even SSD doesn’t allow using a swap space larger than RAM for typical use unless it’s being used for hibernation.

Conclusion

It seems that nothing has significantly changed in the last 7 years. We have more RAM, faster storage, and applications that are more memory hungry. The end result is that swap still isn’t very usable for anything other than hibernation if it’s larger than RAM.

It would be nice if application developers could stop increasing the use of RAM. Currently it seems that the RAM requirements for Linux desktop use are about 3 years behind the RAM requirements for Windows. This is convenient as a PC is fully depreciated according to the tax office after 3 years. This makes it easy to get 3 year old PCs cheaply (or sometimes for free as rubbish) which work really well for Linux. But it would be nice if we could be 4 or 5 years behind Windows in terms of hardware requirements to reduce the hardware requirements for Linux users even further.

Related posts:

  1. Swap Space There is a wide-spread myth that swap space should be...
  2. Modern Swap Use A while ago I wrote a blog post debunking the...
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Categories: thinktime

Russell Coker: Phone Based Lectures

Planet Linux Australia - Sat 19th Apr 2014 14:04

Early this month at a LUV meeting I gave a talk with only my mobile phone to store notes. I used Google Keep to write the notes as it’s one of the easiest ways of writing a note on a PC and quickly transferring it to a phone – if I keep doing this I will find some suitable free software for this task. Owncloud seems promising [1], but at the moment I’m more concerned with people issues than software.

Over the years I’ve experimented with different ways of presenting lectures. I’m now working with the theory that presenting the same data twice (by speaking and text on a projector) distracts the audience and decreases learning.

Editing and Viewing Notes

Google Keep is adequate for maintaining notes, it’s based on notes that are a list of items (like a shopping list) which is fine for lecture notes. It probably has lots of other functionality but I don’t care much about that. Keep is really fast at updating notes, I can commit a change on my laptop and have it visible on my phone in a few seconds over 3G.

Most of the lectures that I’ve given have involved notes on a laptop. My first laptop was a Thinkpad 385XD with a 12.1″ display and all my subsequent laptops have had a bigger screen. When a laptop with a 12″ or larger screen is on a lectern I can see the notes at a glance without having to lean forward when 15 or fewer lines of text are displayed on the screen. 15 lines of text is about the maximum that can be displayed on a slide for the audience to read and with the width of a computer display or projector is enough for a reasonable quantity of text.

When I run Keep on my Galaxy Note 2 it displays about 20 rather short lines of text in a “portrait” orientation (5 points for a lecture) and 11 slightly longer lines in a “landscape” orientation (4 points). In both cases the amount of text displayed on a screen is less than that with a laptop while the font is a lot smaller. My aim is to use free software for everything, so when I replace Keep with Owncloud (or something similar) I will probably have some options for changing the font size. But that means having less than 5 points displayed on screen at a time and thus a change in the way I present my talks (I generally change the order of points based on how well the audience seem to get the concepts so seeing multiple points on screen at the same time is a benefit).

The Samsung Galaxy Note 2 has a 5.5″ display which is one of the largest displays available in a phone. The Sony Xperia X Ultra is one of the few larger phones with a 6.44″ display – that’s a large phone but still not nearly large enough to have more than a few points on screen with a font readable by someone with average vision while it rests on a lectern.

The most obvious solution to the problem of text size is to use a tablet. Modern 10″ tablets have resolutions ranging from 1920*1080 to 2560*1600 and should be more readable than the Thinkpad I used in 1998 which had a 12″ 800*600 display. Another possibility that I’m considering is using an old phone, a Samsung Galaxy S weighs 118 to 155 grams and is easier to hold up than a Galaxy Note 2 which weighs 180g. While 60g doesn’t seem like much difference if I’m going to hold a phone in front of me for most of an hour the smaller and lighter phone will be easier and maybe less distracting for the audience.

Distributing URLs

When I give a talk I often want to share the addresses of relevant web sites with the audience. When I give a talk with the traditional style lecture notes I just put the URLs on the final page (sometimes using tinyurl.com) for people to copy during question time. When I use a phone I have to find another way.

I did a test with QR code recognition and found that a code that takes up most of the width of the screen of my Galaxy Note 2 can be recognised by a Galaxy S at a distance of 50cm. If I ran the same software on a 10″ tablet then it would probably be readable at a distance of a meter, if I had the QR code take up the entire screen on a tablet it might be readable at 1.5m away, so it doesn’t seem plausible to hold up a tablet and allow even the first few rows of the audience to decode a QR code. Even if newer phones have better photographic capabilities than the Galaxy S that I had available for testing there are still lots of people using old phones who I want to support. I think that if QR codes are to be used they have to be usable by at least the first three rows of the audience for a small audience of maybe 50 people as that would allow everyone who’s interested to quickly get in range and scan the code at the end.

Chris Samuel has a photo (taken at the same meeting) showing how a QR code from a phone could be distributed to a room [2]. But that won’t work for all rooms.

One option is to just have the QR code on my phone and allow audience members to scan it after the lecture. As most members of the audience won’t want the URLs it should be possible for the interested people to queue up to scan the QR code(s).

Another possibility I’m considering is to use a temporary post on my documents blog (which isn’t syndicated) for URLs. The WordPress client for Android works reasonably well so I could edit the URL list at any time. That would work reasonably well for talks that have lots of URLs – which is quite rare for me.

A final option is to use Twitter, at the end of a talk I could just tweet the URLs with suitable descriptions. A good portion of the Tweets that I have written is URLs for web sites that I find interesting so this isn’t a change. This is probably the easiest option, but with the usual caveat of using a proprietary service as an interim measure until I get a free software alternative working.

Any suggestions?

Please comment if you have any ideas about ways of addressing these issues.

Also please let me know if anyone is working on a distributed Twitter replacement. Please note that anything which doesn’t support followers on multiple servers and re-tweets and tweeting to users on other servers isn’t useful in this regard.

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  3. Sex and Lectures about Computers I previously wrote about the appropriate references to porn in...
Categories: thinktime

Gabriel Noronha: Solar 1 year on

Planet Linux Australia - Sat 19th Apr 2014 12:04

this time last year we had the solar installed well by this time it was well on the roof … this date last year we had the meter replaced and the solar turned on.

The statistics:

  • kWh Imported 4295.3
  • kWh Exported 3199.9
  • kWh generated according to the inverter 4936
  • Fit Collected at 8c kWh $255.99
  • kWh not purchased or sold 1736.1

I’m currently on a flat rate of 29.084 c/kWh (note my rate has gone up since solar was installed) minus 10% discount  plus 5.5  c /kWh for green energy = 31.94 c /kWh. So the amount not purchased or sold is what I saved by not buying 1736.1*31.94c = $554.51 + the money I got from Fit $255.99 so in a year it’s saved me ~$810.5.

Has the solar been a good investment no…the capital cost was around $8.5k so with the amount saved it’ll take 10 years to pay back. The main reason for this is that we export way too much and the fit is so low if we got paid what it costs us it would of saved us ~$1500 a year and only 5.5 years to pay back.  Do I care if it was a solid investment not really.

If we look at how green it is if we take imported – exported (1095 kWh)  that’s how much power I’ve used from other generators which for my area is black coal, but that has been offset by my green power money purchasing green power from wind and biogass. so does my house run emissions free when it comes to electricity according to an accountant yes, because every kWh of power I’ve used has been purchased from a green source  but maybe not according to an engineer.

Other interesting notes on the power bill:

average kWh used per day including solar from April to may 2013 before purchasing the EV was 12.1 kwh

average kWh used per day including solar from July 2013 to April 2014 post purchasing the EV is 16.5 kwh

so the effect of owning an EV on your power bills is about 4.4 kwh per day $1.40 increased cost. Note: this would also include seasonal cost extras like summertime air con and winter time heating so I won’t have a clear picture until we 1 year of EV ownership.

Categories: thinktime

Gabriel Noronha: Getting ClearOS to work with Atheros Communications AR8151 v2.0 Gigabit Ethernet (rev c0)

Planet Linux Australia - Sat 19th Apr 2014 12:04

ClearOS formally Clarkconnect based of Centos…

Start by enabling the Tim S repo

To install the repo first install the public key (yes all RPM’s will now be signed)

rpm --import ftp://timburgess.net/RPM-GPG-KEY-TimB.txt

Then install the release RPM (by default the ‘timb’ and ‘timb-testing’ repo’s will be disabled)

wget ftp://timburgess.net/repo/clearos/5.2/os/timb-release-1-0.noarch.rpm

rpm -Kv timb-release-1-0.noarch.rpm

rpm -Uvh timb-release-1-0.noarch.rpm

ref http://www.clearfoundation.com/docs/howtos/adding_tim_s_repo

yum --enablerepo=timb install kmod-atl1e

ref http://www.clearfoundation.com/component/option,com_kunena/Itemid,232/catid,28/func,view/id,24438/limit,10/limitstart,50/

last you need to edit the /etc/modprobe.conf

it need to contain an alias for every network card in my case I have a TP-link installed as well so

alias eth0 r8169

alias eth1 atl1e

if you fail to get this to work ifconfig -a will have a odd tmp interface.

Categories: thinktime

Colin Charles: Congratulations Ubuntu, for the wide choice!

Planet Linux Australia - Sat 19th Apr 2014 03:04

Inspired by Yngve Svendsen’s post, I too think it makes absolute sense to congratulate Ubuntu on the 14.04 LTS release (some server notes - MySQL has a section dedicated to it). Ubuntu users have a lot of server choice today (that’s from all major MySQL ecosystem vendors):

  • MySQL 5.5.35 ships in main. It is the default MySQL. Oracle has committed to providing updates to 5.5 throughout the LTS release cycle of Ubuntu (which is longer than the planned EOL for 5.5). This is why the grant of a Micro Release Exception (MRE).
  • MySQL 5.6.16 ships in universe
  • MariaDB 5.5.36 ships in universe.
  • Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.5.34 ships in universe

Ubuntu’s pitch is being the cloud platform of choice, with OpenStack support. This explains why Percona XtraDB Cluster (the only shipping Galera Cluster variant — no upstream Codership release, and no MariaDB Galera Cluster) is critical infrastructure as its used widely in OpenStack deployments. 451Research estimates that the OpenStack distributions market is worth $82 million in 2014 and $119 million in 2015.

Press release had a choice quote from Percona CEO, Peter Zaitsev:

“We are very pleased that Percona XtraDB Cluster is included in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Many organisations that use MySQL need high availability solutions to ensure that their applications meet the expectations of their users. Percona XtraDB Cluster is an easy to use, open source solution for MySQL clustering which addresses these high availability needs. We continue to see growth in Ubuntu usage by our customers and our open source software users so we are confident that the inclusion of Percona XtraDB Cluster in Ubuntu 14.04 will help spread the adoption of cost-effective, high availability MySQL.” Peter Zaitsev, Co-Founder and CEO at Percona

 

Related posts:

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  3. Communications, Ubuntu 6.06 LTS & MySQL downloads
Categories: thinktime

All the same

Seth Godin - Fri 18th Apr 2014 19:04
It's forty degrees out and there's a guy standing in front of the office building, shivering, indulging in his nicotine addiction. I can't possibly empathize with what he's thinking or feeling. As I walk down the street, I pass an...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Glen Turner: Unix holey files

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 18th Apr 2014 10:04

Unix has sparse files. If you write a byte at a seek()ed location to a file then all unwritten bytes prior to that seek()ed-and-write()n byte have value zero when read. Those zeroed bytes take no storage space on the disk (although the accounting for the storage does take some space). You can think of the file as having a "hole".

Sparse files are useful for network testing, as they allow the performance of the storage and I/O hardware to be taken out of the test, leaving the performance of the operating system and the network.

Sparse files for testing are conveniently created using dd(1). For example, to create a 10GiB test file named ‘test-10gibyte.bin’:

$ dd if=/dev/zero of=test-10gibyte.bin bs=1 count=1 seek=$(( (10 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024) - 1))

and to create a 10GB file named ‘test-10gbyte.bin’:

$ dd if=/dev/zero of=test-10gbyte.bin bs=1 count=1 seek=$(( (10 * 1000 * 1000 * 1000) - 1)) Aside: Units for networking and units for RAM

Networking uses SI units for bandwidth, due to the close relationship of bandwidth with signalling frequencies, measured in SI's Hertz. The error between (103)n and (210)n increases with n; becoming concerning when n=3 (GB versus GiB); and being unsustainably large when n≥4 (TB versus TiB).

Networking also uses bits as the basic unit rather than bytes, again due to the closer relationship of bits to signalling frequencies. In networking there are 8 bits per byte. Care is taken to distinguish Gbps (gigabits per second) and GBps (gigabytes per second) due to the eight-fold difference. Incorrect casing of the ‘b’ leads to exasperated coworkers.

Categories: thinktime

Colin Charles: SSL and MariaDB/MySQL

Planet Linux Australia - Fri 18th Apr 2014 04:04

With the recent Heartbleed bug, people are clearly more interested in their MariaDB/MySQL running with SSL and if they have problems. First up, you should read the advisory notes: MariaDB, Percona Server (blog), and MySQL (blog).

Next, when you install MariaDB (or a variant) you are usually dynamically linked to the OpenSSL library that the system provides. Typically on startup of MariaDB 10.0.10 on CentOS 6.5 (packages from the MariaDB repository), you can check what your status of SSL is.

MariaDB [(none)]> show variables like 'have_ssl'; +---------------+----------+ | Variable_name | Value | +---------------+----------+ | have_ssl | DISABLED | +---------------+----------+ 1 row in set (0.00 sec)

This means that SSL options are compiled, but mysqld didn’t start with it. You can verify SSL is linked dynamically:

ldd `which mysqld` | grep ssl libssl.so.10 => /usr/lib64/libssl.so.10 (0x00007ff82d1b1000)

If you are running with SSL enabled (some documentation at MySQL) you will have different options naturally. You can do this via: /etc/init.d/mysql start --ssl. Output now changes:

MariaDB [(none)]> show variables like 'have_ssl'; +---------------+-------+ | Variable_name | Value | +---------------+-------+ | have_ssl | YES | +---------------+-------+ 1 row in set (0.00 sec)

The value NO will be displayed if the server is not compiled with SSL support. See SSL Server System Variables for more.

Related posts:

  1. MySQL 5.6 system variables in the MariaDB 10 server
  2. Using MariaDB on CentOS 6
  3. MariaDB 10.0.5 storage engines – check the Linux packages
Categories: thinktime

The Death of the Web Design Agency?

a list apart - Fri 18th Apr 2014 01:04

Others have gone as far to say that the very concept of a user experience-focused agency simply isn’t a long-term play, largely because of what the big folks are up to. Facebook and Google went on a design/product buying spree specifically because they needed to figure out how to own this thinking themselves, and other tech companies have followed. And more traditional industries, like insurance, media, and retail? They’ll develop robust in-house capabilities soon, if they haven’t already.

Ready to pack up your things and start a landscaping business? Not so fast.

Greg Hoy, Differentiate or Die?

In The Pastry Box Project today, Greg Hoy of Happy Cog talks honestly about why the first quarter of this year sucked for most web design agencies (including ours), assesses the new and growing long-term threats to the agency business model, and shares his thinking on what we in the client services design business can do to survive, and maybe even thrive.

Categories: thinktime

Cennydd Bowles on UX & Design: Letter to a Junior Designer

a list apart - Thu 17th Apr 2014 22:04

I admit it: you intimidate me. Your work is vivid and imaginative, far superior to my woeful scratchings at a similar age. The things I struggle to learn barely make you sweat. One day, you’ll be a better designer than me.

But for now, I can cling to my sole advantage, the one thing that makes me more valuable: I get results. I can put a dent in cast-iron CEO arguments. I can spot risks and complications months in advance. In the wager that is design, I usually bet on the right color. People trust me with their stake.

So, if you’ll humor me, maybe I can offer a few suggestions to speed you toward the inevitable.

Slow down

You’re damn talented. But in your eagerness to prove it, you sometimes rush toward a solution. You pluck an idea from the branch and throw it onto the plate before it has time to ripen. Don’t mistake speed for precocity: the world doesn’t need wrong answers in record time.

Perhaps your teachers exalted The Idea as the gem of creative work; taught you The Idea is the hard part. I disagree. Ideas aren’t to be trusted. They need to be wrung dry, ripped apart. We have the rare luxury that our professional diligence often equates to playfulness: to do our job properly, we must disassemble our promising ideas and make them into something better.

The process feels mechanical and awkward initially. In time, the distinction between idea and iteration will blur. Eventually, the two become one.

So go deeper. Squander loose time on expanding your ideas, even if you’re sure they’re perfect or useless. Look closely at decisions you think are trivial. I guarantee you’ll find better solutions around the corner.

Think it through

We’d love to believe design speaks for itself, but a large part of the job is helping others hear its voice. Persuasive rationale—the why to your work—is what turns a great document into a great product.

If you haven’t already, sometime in your career you’ll meet an awkward sonofabitch who wants to know why every pixel is where you put it. You should be able to articulate an answer for that person—yes, for every pixel. What does this line do? Well, it defines. It distinguishes. But why here? Why that color? Why that thickness? “It looks better” won’t suffice. You’ll need a rationale that explains hierarchy, balance, gestalt—in other words, esoteric ways to say “it looks better,” but ways that reassure stakeholders that you understand the foundations of your craft. Similarly, be sure you can explain which alternatives you rejected, and why. (Working this through will also help you see if you have been diligent or if you’ve been clinging to a pet idea.) This might sound political. It is. Politics is just the complex art of navigating teams and people, and the more senior you get, the more time you’ll spend with people.

Temper your passion

Your words matter: be careful not to get carried away. Passion is useful, but you’ll be more effective when you demonstrate the evidence behind your beliefs, rather than the strength of those beliefs. Softer language earns fewer retweets but better results. If you have a hunch, call it a hunch; it shows honesty, and it leaves you headroom to be unequivocal about the things you’re sure of.

Similarly, your approach to your work will change. Right now design is an ache. You see all the brokenness in the world: stupid products, trivial mistakes, bad designs propped up with scribbled corrections. That stupidity never goes away, but in time you learn how to live with it. What matters is your ability to change things. Anyone can complain about the world, but only a good few can fix it.

That fury, that energy, fades with time, until the question becomes one of choosing which battles to arm yourself for, and which to surrender. Often this means gravitating toward the biggest problems. As you progress in the field, your attention may turn from tools and techniques to values and ethics. The history of the industry is instructive: give it proper attention. After all, all our futures shrink with time, until finally the past becomes all we have.

You’ll come to appreciate that it can be better to help others reach the right outcomes themselves than do it yourself. That, of course, is what we call leadership.

Finally, there may come a point when you realize you’re better served by thinking less about design. Work and life should always be partially separate, but there’s no doubt that the experiences you have in your life shape your work too. So please remember to be a broad, wise human being. Travel (thoughtfully) as much as you can. Read literature: a good novel will sometimes teach you more than another design book can. Remind yourself the sea exists. You’ll notice the empathy, sensitivity, cunning, and understanding you develop make your working life better too.

But you’re smart, and of course you realize this is really a letter to the younger me. And, alongside, it’s a lament at my nagging sense of obsolescence; the angst of a few grey hairs and the emerging trends I don’t quite understand. Which is mildly ridiculous at my age—but this is a mildly ridiculous industry. And you’ll inherit it all, in time. Good luck.

Yours,
Cennydd

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 79: Magic, flu shots, and play dates and dinner

Planet Linux Australia - Thu 17th Apr 2014 22:04

Zoe slept until 7:45am this morning, which is absolutely unheard of in our house. She did wake up at about 5:15am yelling out for me because she'd kicked her doona off and lost Cowie, but went back to sleep once I sorted that out.

She was super grumpy when she woke up, which I mostly attributed to being hungry, so I got breakfast into her as quickly as possible and she perked up afterwards.

Today there was a free magic show at the Bulimba Library at 10:30am, so we biked down there. I really need to work on curbing Zoe's procrastination. We started trying to leave the house at 10am, and as it was, we only got there with 2 minutes to spare before the show started.

Magic Glen put on a really good show. He was part comedian, part sleight of hand magician, and he did a very entertaining show. There were plenty of gags in it for the adults. Zoe started out sitting in my lap, but part way through just got up and moved closer to the front to sit with the other kids. I think she enjoyed herself. I'd have no hesitation hiring this guy for a future birthday party.

Zoe had left her two stuffed toys from the car at Megan's house on Tuesday after our Port of Brisbane tour, and so after the magic show we biked to her place to retrieve them. It was close to lunch by this stage, so we stayed for lunch, and the girls had a bit of a play in the back yard while Megan's little sister napped.

It was getting close to time to leave for our flu shots, so I decided to just bike directly to the doctor from Megan's place. I realised after we left that we'd still left the stuffed toys behind, but the plan was to drive back after our flu shots and have another swim their neighbour's pool, so it was all good.

We got to the doctor, and waited for Sarah to arrive. Sarah and I weren't existing patients at Zoe's doctor, but we'd decided to get the flu shot as a family to try and ease the experience for Zoe. We both had to do new patient intake stuff before we had a consult with Zoe's doctor and got prescriptions for the flu shot.

I popped next door to the adjacent pharmacy get the prescriptions filled, and then the nurse gave us the shots.

For the last round of vaccinations that Zoe received, she needed three, and she screamed the building down at the first jab. The poor nurse was very shaken, so we've been working to try and get her to feel more at ease about this one.

Zoe went first, and she took a deep breath, and she was winding up to freak out when she had her shot, but then it was all over, and she let the breath go, and looked around with a kind of "is that it?" reaction. She didn't even cry. I was so proud of her.

I got my shot, and then Sarah got hers, and we had to sit in the waiting room for 10 minutes to make sure we didn't turn into pumpkins, and we were on our way.

We biked home, I grabbed our swim gear, and we drove back to Megan's place.

The pool ended up being quite cold. Megan didn't want to get in, and Zoe didn't last long either. Megan's Mum was working back late, so I invited Megan, her Dad and her sister over for dinner, and we headed home so I could prepare it. One of Zoe's stuffed toys had been located.

We had a nice dinner of deviled sausages made in the Thermomix, and for a change I didn't have a ton of leftovers. Jason had found the other stuffed toy in his truck, so we'd finally tracked them both down.

After Megan and family went home, I got Zoe to bed without much fuss, and pretty much on time. I think she should sleep well tonight.

Categories: thinktime

The bottomless pit of pleasing strangers

Seth Godin - Thu 17th Apr 2014 19:04
You will never, ever run out of strangers. And so, the goal of perfectly pleasing an infinite number of passersby is a fool's errand. They come with their own worldview, their own issues, their own biases. Since they don't know...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Deaths from viral hepatitis surpasses HIV/AIDS as a preventable cause of death in Australia

Teaser:  Deaths from viral Hepatitis B and C have surpassed HIV/AIDS in many countries, including Australia, according to an analysis of the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study.

This article was originally published in The Melbourne Newsroom on April 17. View the article here.

Deaths from viral Hepatitis B and C have surpassed HIV/AIDS in many countries, including Australia and in Western Europe, according to an analysis of the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study.

Image: Anti-dsDNA antibodies, Wikipedia

read more

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 78: Alginate, dragon boats and relatives

Planet Linux Australia - Wed 16th Apr 2014 21:04

I ordered some alginate the other day, and it arrived yesterday, but we were out, so I had to pick it up from the post office this morning.

Anshu and I picked it up before Zoe was dropped off. We had a couple of attempts at making some, but didn't quite get the ratios or the quantity right, and we were too slow, so we'll have to try again. The plan is to try and make a cast of Zoe's hand, since we were messing around with plaster of Paris recently. I've found a good Instructable to try and follow.

Nana and her dragon boating team were competing in the Australian Dragon Boat Championships over Easter, and her first race was today. It also ended up that today was the best day to try and go and watch, so when she called to say her first race would be around noon, I quickly decided we should jump in the car and head up to Kawana Waters.

We abandoned the alginate, and I slapped together a picnic lunch for Zoe and I, and we bid Anshu farewell and drove up.

Zoe's fever seemed to break yesterday afternoon after Sarah picked her up, and she slept well, but despite all that, she napped in the car on the way up, which was highly unusual, but helped pass the time. She woke up when we arrived. I managed to get a car park not too far from the finish line, and we managed to find Nana, whose team was about the enter the marshaling area.

Her boat was closest to the shore we were watching from, and her boat came second in their qualifying round for the 200 metre race, meaning they went straight through to the semi-finals.

The semi-finals were going to be much later, and I wanted to capitalise on the fact that we were going to have to drive right past my Mum and Dad's place on the way home to try and see my sister and her family, since we missed them on Monday.

We headed back after lunch and a little bit of splashing around in the lake, and ended up staying for dinner at Mum and Dad's. Zoe had a great time catching up with her cousin Emma, and fooling around with Grandpa and Uncle Michael.

She got to bed a little bit late by the time we got home, but I'm hopeful she'll sleep well tonight.

Categories: thinktime

The thing that happened before this

Seth Godin - Wed 16th Apr 2014 19:04
The most underrated scene in the Wizard of Oz is the hallway leading up to the audience with the great and powerful one. One of the reasons that Oz is seen as being particularly great and powerful is that it's...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

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