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Updated: 14 min 34 sec ago

Gabriel Noronha: EVSE for Sun Valley Toursit Park

Wed 24th Sep 2014 21:09

So you might of seen a couple posts about Sun Valley Tourist Park, that is because we visit there a lot to visit grandma and grandpa (wife’s parents) .  So we decided because its outside of our return range we have to charge there to get home if we take the I-MIEV. but with the Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) that comes with the car limits the charge rate to 10amps max. So we convinced the park to install a 32amp EVSE.  This allow us to charge at the I-MIEV full rate of 13amps so 30% faster.

Aeroviroment EVSE-RS at Sun Valley

If you want to know more about the EVSE it’s an Aeroviroment EVSE RS.  It should work fine with the Holden volt, Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV, I-MIEV 2012 or later (may not work with 2010 models) and the Nissan LEAF.

If you are in the central coast and want somewhere to charge you can find the details on how to contact the park on plugshare. It’s available for public use depend on how busy the park is and the driver paying a nominal fee to cover electricity , and the driver phones ahead, during office hours.

 

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 238: Picnic play date in Roma Street Parklands with a side trip to the museum

Wed 24th Sep 2014 21:09

School holidays are a good time for Zoe to have a weekday play date with my friend Kim's daughter Sarah, and we'd lined up a picnic in Roma Street Parklands today.

Zoe had woken up at about 1:30am with a nightmare, and subsequently slept in. It had taken me forever to get back to sleep, so I was pretty tired and slept a bit late too.

We got going eventually, and narrowly missed a train, so had to wait for the next one. We got into the Parklands pretty much on time, and despite the drizzly weather, had a nice morning making our way around the gardens.

The weather progressively improved by lunchtime, and after an early lunch, Kim and kids headed home, and we headed into the museum.

Unfortunately I was wrong about which station we had to get off to go to the museum, and we got off at Southbank rather than South Brisbane and had a long, slow walk of shame to get to the museum.

We used the freebie tickets I'd gotten to see the Deep Oceans exhibit, before heading home. I love the museum's free cloaking service, as it allowed me to divest myself of picnic blankets, my backpack and the Esky while we were at the museum.

While we were making the long walk of shame to the museum, I got a call from the car repairer to say that my car was ready, so after we returned to the rental car at the train station we drove directly to the repairer and collected the car, which involved a lot of shuffling of car contents and car seats. I then thought I'd lost my car key, and that involved an unnecessary second visit back to the car rental place on foot before I discovered it was in my pocket all along.

When we got home, Zoe wanted to play pirates again with our chocolate gold coins. What we wound up playing was a variant of "hide the thimble" in her bedroom, where she hid the chocolate gold coins all over the place, and then proceeded to show me where she'd hidden them all. It was very cute.

There was a tiny bit of TV before Sarah arrived to pick up Zoe.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 237: A day with the grandparents and a lot cooking

Wed 24th Sep 2014 21:09

Yesterday was a pretty full on day. I had to drop the car off to get the rear bumper replaced, and I also had to get to my Thermomix Consultant practical training by 9:30am.

I'd arranged to drop the car off at 8am and then pick up a rental car, and Mum was coming to collect Zoe at 8:30am. Zoe woke up at a good time, and we managed to get going extra early, so I dropped the car off early and was picking up the rental car before 8am.

Mum also arrived extra early, so I used the additional time to swing by the Valley to check my PO box, as I had a suspicion my Thermomix Consultant kit might have arrived, and it had.

I then had to get over to my Group Leader's house to do the practical training, which consisted of watching and giving a demo, with a whole bunch of advice and feedback along the way. It was a long day of much cooking, but it was good to get all of the behind the scenes tricks on how to prepare for a demo, give the demo and have it all run smoothly and to schedule.

I then headed over to Mum and Dad's for dinner. Zoe had had a great day, and my Aunty Peggy was also down from Toowoomba. We stayed for dinner and then headed home. I managed to get Zoe to bed more or less on time.

Categories: thinktime

Tim Serong: Something Like a Public Consultation

Wed 24th Sep 2014 19:09

The Australian government often engages in public consultation on a variety of matters. This is a good thing, because it provides an opportunity for us to participate in our governance. One such recent consultation was from the Attorney-General’s Department on Online Copyright Infringement. I quote:

On 30 July 2014, the Attorney-General, Senator the Hon George Brandis, and the Minister for Communications Malcolm Turnbull MP released a discussion paper on online copyright infringement.

Submissions were sought from interested organisations and individuals on the questions outlined in the discussion paper and on other possible approaches to address this issue.

Submissions were accepted via email, and there was even a handy online form where you could just punch in your answers to the questions provided. The original statement on publishing submissions read:

Submissions received may be made public on this website unless otherwise specified. Submitters should indicate whether any part of the content should not be disclosed to the public. Where confidentiality is requested, submitters are encouraged to provide a public version that can be made available.

This has since been changed to:

Submissions received from peak industry groups, companies, academics and non-government organisations that have not requested confidentiality are being progressively published on the Online copyright infringement—submissions page.

As someone who in a fit of inspiration late one night (well, a fit of some sort, but I’ll call it inspiration), put in an individual submission I am deeply disappointed that submissions from individuals are apparently not being published. Geordie Guy has since put in a Freedom of Information request for all individual submissions, but honestly the AGD should be publishing these. It was after all a public consultation.

For the record then, here’s my submission:

Question 1: What could constitute ‘reasonable steps’ for ISPs to prevent or avoid copyright infringement?

In our society, internet access has become a necessary public utility.  We communicate with our friends and families, we do our banking, we purchase and sell goods and services, we participate in the democratic process; we do all these things online.  It is not the role of gas, power or water companies to determine what their customers do with the gas, power or water they pay for.  Similarly, it is not the role of ISPs to police internet usage.

Question 2: How should the costs of any ‘reasonable steps’ be shared between industry participants?

Bearing in mind my answer to question 1, any costs incurred should rest squarely with the copyright owners.

Question 3: Should the legislation provide further guidance on what would constitute ‘reasonable steps’?

The legislation should explicitly state that:

  1. Disconnection is not a reasonable step given that internet access is a necessary public utility.
  2. Deep packet inspection, or any other technological means of determining the content, or type of content being accessed by a customer, is not a reasonable step as this would constitute a gross invasion of privacy.
Question 4: Should different ISPs be able to adopt different ‘reasonable steps’ and, if so, what would be required within a legislative framework to accommodate this?

Given that it is not the role of ISPs to police internet usage (see answer to question 1), there are no reasonable steps for ISPs to adopt.

Question 5: What rights should consumers have in response to any scheme or ‘reasonable steps’ taken by ISPs or rights holders? Does the legislative framework need to provide for these rights?

Consumers need the ability to freely challenge any infringement notice, and there must be a guarantee they will not be disconnected.  The fact that an IP address does not uniquely identify a specific person should be enshrined in legislation.  The customer’s right to privacy must not be violated (see point 2 of answer to question 3).

Question 6: What matters should the Court consider when determining whether to grant an injunction to block access to a particular website?

As we have seen with ASIC’s spectacularly inept use of section 313 of Australia’s Telecommunications Act to inadvertently block access to 250,000 web sites, such measures can and will result in wild and embarrassing unintended consequences.  In any case, any means employed in Australia to block access to overseas web sites is exceedingly trivial to circumvent using freely available proxy servers and virtual private networks.  Consequently the Court should not waste its time granting injunctions to block access to web sites.

Question 7: Would the proposed definition adequately and appropriately expand the safe harbour scheme?

The proposed definition would seem to adequately and appropriately expand the safe harbour scheme, assuming the definition of “service provider” extends to any person or entity who provides internet access of any kind to any other person or entity.  For example, if my personal internet connection is also being used by a friend, a family member or a random passerby who has hacked my wifi, I should be considered a service provider to them under the safe harbour scheme.

Question 8: How can the impact of any measures to address online copyright infringement best be measured?

I am deeply dubious of the efficacy and accuracy of any attempt to measure the volume and impact of copyright infringement.  Short of actively surveilling the communications of the entire population, there is no way to accurately measure the volume of copyright infringement at any point in time, hence there is no way to effectively quantify the impact of any measures designed to address online copyright infringement.

Even if the volume of online copyright infringement could be accurately measured, one cannot assume that an infringing copy equates to a lost sale.  At one end of the spectrum, a single infringing copy could have been made by someone who would never have been willing or able to pay for access to that work.  At the other end of the spectrum, a single infringing copy could expose a consumer to a whole range of new media, resulting in many purchases that never would have occurred otherwise.

Question 9: Are there alternative measures to reduce online copyright infringement that may be more effective?

There are several alternative measures that may be more effective, including:

  1. Content distributors should ensure that their content is made available to the Australian public at a reasonable price, at the same time as releases in other countries, and absent any Digital Restrictions Management technology (DRM, also sometimes erroneously termed Digital Rights Management, which does more to inconvenience legitimate purchasers than it does to curb copyright infringement).
  2. Content creators and distributors should be encouraged to update their business models to accommodate and take advantage of the realities of ubiquitous digital communications.  For example, works can be made freely available online under liberal licenses (such as Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike) which massively increases exposure, whilst also being offered for sale, perhaps in higher quality on physical media, or with additional bonus content in the for-purchase versions.  Public screenings, performances, displays, commissions and so forth (depending on the media in question) will contribute further income streams all while reducing copyright infringement.
  3. Australian copyright law could be amended such that individuals making copies of works (e.g. downloading works, or sharing works with each other online) on a noncommercial basis does not constitute copyright infringement.  Changing the law in this way would immediately reduce online copyright infringement, because a large amount of activity currently termed infringement would no longer be seen as such.

Finally, as member of Pirate Party Australia it would be remiss of me not to provide a link to the party’s rather more detailed and well-referenced submission, which thankfully was published by the AGD. We’ve also got a Pozible campaign running to raise funds for an English translation of the Dutch Pirate Bay blocking appeal trial ruling, which will help add to the body of evidence demonstrating that web site blocking is ineffective.

Categories: thinktime

Craige McWhirter: Resizing a Root Volume for an Openstack Instance

Wed 24th Sep 2014 17:09

This documents how to resize an OpenStack instance that has it's root partition backed by a volume. In this circumstance "nova resize" will not resize the diskspace as expected.

Assumptions: Shutdown the instance you wish to resize

Check the status of the source VM and stop it if it's not already:

$ nova list +--------------------------------------+-----------+--------+------------+- ------------+---------------------------------------------+ | ID | Name | Status | Task State | Power State | Networks | +--------------------------------------+-----------+--------+------------+- ------------+---------------------------------------------+ | 4fef1b97-901e-4ab1-8e1f-191cb2f75969 | ResizeMe0 | ACTIVE | - | Running | Tutorial=192.168.0.107 | +--------------------------------------+-----------+--------+------------+- ------------+---------------------------------------------+ $ nova stop ResizeMe0 $ nova list +--------------------------------------+-----------+--------+------------+- ------------+---------------------------------------------+ | ID | Name | Status | Task State | Power State | Networks | +--------------------------------------+-----------+---------+-----------+- ------------+---------------------------------------------+ | 4fef1b97-901e-4ab1-8e1f-191cb2f75969 | ResizeMe0 | SHUTOFF | - | Running | Tutorial=192.168.0.107 | +--------------------------------------+-----------+---------+------------+- ------------+---------------------------------------------+ Identify and extend the volume

Obtain the ID of the volume attached to the instance:

$ nova show ResizeMe0 | grep volumes | os-extended-volumes:volumes_attached | [{"id": "616dbaa6-f5a5-4f06-9855-fdf222847f3e"}] |

Set the volume's state to be "available" to so we can resize it:

$ cinder reset-state --state available 616dbaa6-f5a5-4f06-9855-fdf222847f3e $ cinder show 2f8f0dc2-3c39-48a4-80ad-afe62de095d0 | grep " status " | status | available |

Extend the volume to the desired size:

$ cinder extend 616dbaa6-f5a5-4f06-9855-fdf222847f3e 4

Set the status back to being in use:

$ cinder reset-state --state in-use 616dbaa6-f5a5-4f06-9855-fdf222847f3e Start the instance back up again

Start the instance again:

$ nova start ResizeMe0

Voila! Your old instance is now running with an increased disk size as requested.

Categories: thinktime

Russell Coker: Cheap 3G Data in Australia

Wed 24th Sep 2014 17:09
The Request

I was asked for advice about cheap 3G data plans. One of the people who asked me has a friend with no home Internet access, the friend wants access but doesn’t want to pay too much. I don’t know whether the person in question can’t use ADSL/Cable (maybe they are about to move house) or whether they just don’t want to pay for it.

3G data in urban areas in Australia is fast enough for most Internet use. But it’s not good for online games or VOIP. It’s also not very useful for Youtube and other online video. There is a variety of 3G speed testing apps for Android phones and there are presumably similar apps for the iPhone. Before signing up for 3G at home it’s probably best to get a friend who’s on the network in question to test Internet speed at your house, it would be annoying to sign up for an annual contract and then discover that your home is in a 3G dead spot.

Cheapest Offers

The best offer at the moment for moderate data use seems to be Amaysim with 10G for $99.90 and an expiry time of 365 days [1]. 10G in a year isn’t a lot, but it’s pre-paid so the user can buy another 10G of data whenever they want. At the moment $10 for 1G of data in a month and $20 for 2G of data in a month seem to be common offerings for 3G data in Australia. If you use exactly 1G per month then Amaysim isn’t any better than a number of other telcos, but if your usage varies (as it does with most people) then spreading the data use over several months offers significant savings without the need to save big downloads for the last day of the month.

For more serious Internet use Virgin has pre-paid offerings of 6G for $30 and 12G for $40 which has to be used in a month [2]. Anyone who uses an average of more than 3G per month will get better value from the Virgin offers.

If anyone knows of cheaper options than Amaysim and Virgin then please let me know.

Better Coverage

Both Amaysim and Virgin use the Optus network which covers urban areas quite well. I used Virgin a few years ago (and presume that it has only improved since then) and my wife uses Amaysim now. I haven’t had any great problems with either telco. If you need better coverage than the Optus network provides then Telstra is the only option. Telstra have a number of prepaid offers, the most interesting is $100 for 10G of data that expires in 90 days [3].

That Telstra offer is the same price as the Amaysim offer and only slightly more expensive than Virgin if you average 3.3G per month. It’s a really good deal if you average 3.3G per month as you can expect it to be faster and have better coverage.

Which One to Choose?

I think that the best option for someone who is initially connecting their home via 3g is to start with Amaysim. Amaysim is the cheapest for small usage and they have an Amaysim Android app and web page for tracking usage. After using a few gig of data on Amaysim it should be possible to determine which plan is going to be most economical in the long term.

Connecting to the Internet

To get the best speed you need a 4G AKA LTE connection. But given that 3G speed is great enough to use expensive amounts of data it doesn’t seem necessary to me. I’ve done a lot of work over the Internet with 3G from Virgin, Kogan, Aldi, and Telechoice and haven’t felt a need to pay for anything faster.

I think that the best thing to do is to use an old phone running Android 2.3 or iOS 4.3 as a Wifi access point. The cost of a dedicated 3G Wifi AP is enough to significantly change the economics of such Internet access and most people have access to old smart phones.

Related posts:

  1. Changing Phone Prices in Australia 18 months ago when I signed up with Virgin Mobile...
  2. Cheap Net Access in Australia The cheapest ADSL or Cable net access in Australia seems...
  3. Aldi Changes, Cheap Telcos, and Estimating Costs I’ve been using Aldi as my mobile phone provider for...
Categories: thinktime

Robert Collins: what-poles-for-the-tent

Wed 24th Sep 2014 15:09

So Monty and Sean have recently blogged about about the structures (1, 2) they think may work better for OpenStack. I like the thrust of their thinking but had some mumblings of my own to add.

Firstly, I very much like the focus on social structure and needs – what our users and deployers need from us. That seems entirely right.

And I very much like the getting away from TC picking winners and losers. That was never an enjoyable thing when I was on the TC, and I don’t think it has made OpenStack better.

However, the thing that picking winners and losers did was that it allowed users to pick an API and depend on it. Because it was the ‘X API for OpenStack’. If we don’t pick winners, then there is no way to say that something is the ‘X API for OpenStack’, and that means that there is no forcing function for consistency between different deployer clouds. And so this appears to be why Ring 0 is needed: we think our users want consistency in being able to deploy their application to Rackspace or HP Helion. They want vendor neutrality, and by giving up winners-and-losers we give up vendor neutrality for our users.

Thats the only explanation I can come up with for needing a Ring 0 – because its still winners and losers (e.g. picking an arbitrary project) keystone, grandfathering it in, if you will. If we really want to get out of the role of selecting projects, I think we need to avoid this. And we need to avoid it without losing vendor neutrality (or we need to give up the idea of vendor neutrality).

One might say that we must pick winners for the very core just by its, but I don’t think thats true. If the core is small, many people will still want vendor neutrality higher up the stack. If the core is large, then we’ll have a larger % of APIs covered and stable granting vendor neutrality. So a core with fixed APIs will be under constant pressure to expand: not just from developers of projects, but from users that want API X to be fixed and guaranteed available and working a particular way at [most] OpenStack clouds.

Ring 0 also fulfils a quality aspect – we can check that it all works together well in a realistic timeframe with our existing tooling. We are essentially proposing to pick functionality that we guarantee to users; and an API for that which they have everywhere, and the matching implementation we’ve tested.

To pull from Monty’s post:

“What does a basic end user need to get a compute resource that works and seems like a computer? (end user facet)

What does Nova need to count on existing so that it can provide that. “

He then goes on to list a bunch of things, but most of them are not needed for that:

We need Nova (its the only compute API in the project today). We don’t need keystone (Nova can run in noauth mode and deployers could just have e.g. Apache auth on top). We don’t need Neutron (Nova can do that itself). We don’t need cinder (use local volumes). We need Glance. We don’t need Designate. We don’t need a tonne of stuff that Nova has in it (e.g. quotas) – end users kicking off a simple machine have -very- basic needs.

Consider the things that used to be in Nova: Deploying containers. Neutron. Cinder. Glance. Ironic. We’ve been slowly decomposing Nova (yay!!!) and if we keep doing so we can imagine getting to a point where there truly is a tightly focused code base that just does one thing well. I worry that we won’t get there unless we can ensure there is no pressure to be inside Nova to ‘win’.

So there’s a choice between a relatively large set of APIs that make the guaranteed available APIs be comprehensive, or a small set that that will give users what they need just at the beginning but might not be broadly available and we’ll be depending on some unspecified process for the deployers to agree and consolidate around what ones they make available consistently.

In sort one of the big reasons we were picking winners and losers in the TC was to consolidate effort around a single API – not implementation (keystone is already on its second implementation). All the angst about defcore and compatibility testing is going to be multiplied when there is lots of ecosystem choice around APIs above Ring 0, and the only reason that won’t be a problem for Ring 0 is that we’ll still be picking winners.

How might we do this?

One way would be to keep picking winners at the API definition level but not the implementation level, and make the competition be able to replace something entirely if they implement the existing API [and win hearts and minds of deployers]. That would open the door to everything being flexible – and its happened before with Keystone.

Another way would be to not even have a Ring 0. Instead have a project/program that is aimed at delivering the reference API feature-set built out of a single, flat Big Tent – and allow that project/program to make localised decisions about what components to use (or not). Testing that all those things work together is not much different than the current approach, but we’d have separated out as a single cohesive entity the building of a product (Ring 0 is clearly a product) from the projects that might go into it. Projects that have unstable APIs would clearly be rejected by this team; projects with stable APIs would be considered etc. This team wouldn’t be the TC : they too would be subject to the TC’s rulings.

We could even run multiple such teams – as hinted at by Dean Troyer one of the email thread posts. Running with that I’d then be suggesting

  • IaaS product: selects components from the tent to make OpenStack/IaaS
  • PaaS product: selects components from the tent to make OpenStack/PaaS
  • CaaS product (containers)
  • SaaS product (storage)
  • NaaS product (networking – but things like NFV, not the basic Neutron we love today). Things where the thing you get is useful in its own right, not just as plumbing for a VM.

So OpenStack/NaaS would have an API or set of APIs, and they’d be responsible for considering maturity, feature set, and so on, but wouldn’t ‘own’ Neutron, or ‘Neutron incubator’ or any other component – they would be a *cross project* team, focused at the product layer, rather than the component layer, which nearly all of our folk end up locked into today.

Lastly Sean has also pointed out that we have large N N^2 communication issues – I think I’m proposing to drive the scope of any one project down to a minimum, which gives us more N, but shrinks the size within any project, so folk don’t burn out as easily, *and* so that it is easier to predict the impact of changes – clear contracts and APIs help a huge amount there.



Categories: thinktime

Lev Lafayette: Opportunities and Issues in Free Software

Tue 23rd Sep 2014 22:09

Presentation to Software Freedom Day (Melbourne), September 2014

Categories: thinktime

Andrew McDonnell: Evaluating the security of OpenWRT (part 2) – bugfix

Tue 23rd Sep 2014 22:09

I had a bug applying the RELRO flag to busybox, this is fixed in GitHub now.

For some reason the build links the busybox binary a second time and I missed the flag.

Also an omission from my prior blog entry: uClibc has RELRO turned on in its configuration already in OpenWRT, so does not need flags passing through to it. However, it is failing to build its libraries with RELRO in all cases, in spite of the flag. This problem doesn’t happen in a standalone uClibc build from the latest uClibc trunk, but I haven’t scoped how to get uClibc trunk into OpenWRT. This may have been unclear they way I described it.

Categories: thinktime

Sonia Hamilton: SaltStack Essential Reading

Tue 23rd Sep 2014 16:09

A list of ‘Essential Reading’ for SaltStack. A collection of useful links, mostly for myself but possibly helpful to others.

Categories: thinktime

Craige McWhirter: Converting an Instance to an Image in OpenStack

Tue 23rd Sep 2014 15:09
Assumptions: Create a snapshot of the instance

Check the status of the source VM and stop it if it's not already:

$ nova list +--------------------------------------+-----------+--------+------------+- ------------+---------------------------------------------+ | ID | Name | Status | Task State | Power State | Networks | +--------------------------------------+-----------+--------+------------+- ------------+---------------------------------------------+ | 4fef1b97-901e-4ab1-8e1f-191cb2f75969 | Tutorial1 | ACTIVE | - | Running | Tutorial=192.168.0.107 | +--------------------------------------+-----------+--------+------------+- ------------+---------------------------------------------+ $ nova stop Tutorial1 $ nova list +--------------------------------------+-----------+--------+------------+- ------------+---------------------------------------------+ | ID | Name | Status | Task State | Power State | Networks | +--------------------------------------+-----------+---------+-----------+- ------------+---------------------------------------------+ | 4fef1b97-901e-4ab1-8e1f-191cb2f75969 | Tutorial1 | SHUTOFF | - | Running | Tutorial=192.168.0.107 | +--------------------------------------+-----------+---------+------------+- ------------+---------------------------------------------+

Take a snapshot and check the result:

$ nova image-create --poll Tutorial1 Tutorial1Snapshot Server snapshotting... 100% complete Finished $ nova image-list +--------------------------------------+-------------------+--------+--------+ | ID | Name | Status | Server | +--------------------------------------+-------------------+--------+--------+ | 47e192f8-32b2-4839-8392-a18e3be1b9a6 | Tutorial1Snapshot | ACTIVE | | +--------------------------------------+-------------------+--------+--------+ Convert that snapshot into an image

Obtain the snapshot ID from cinder:

$ cinder snapshot-list +--------------------------------------+------------------------------------ --+----------+-------------------------+------+ | ID | Volume ID | Status | Display Name | Size | +--------------------------------------+------------------------------------ --+----------+-------------------------+------+ | 6a09198d-3b14-438d-a8e2-0473331fa0b7 | 616dbaa6-f5a5-4f06-9855-fdf222847f3 e | deleting | snapshot for Tutorial1 | 10 | +--------------------------------------+------------------------------------ --+----------+-------------------------+------+

Create a volume from that snapshot:

$ cinder create --snapshot-id 6a09198d-3b14-438d-a8e2-0473331fa0b7 2 +---------------------+--------------------------------------+ | Property | Value | +---------------------+--------------------------------------+ | attachments | [] | | availability_zone | MyZone | | bootable | false | | created_at | 2014-09-23T02:19:48.414823 | | display_description | None | | display_name | None | | encrypted | False | | id | 8fc9e82d-bb57-4e74-a48a-93e20c94fe2f | | metadata | {} | | size | 2 | | snapshot_id | 6a09198d-3b14-438d-a8e2-0473331fa0b7 | | source_volid | None | | status | creating | | volume_type | block | +---------------------+--------------------------------------+

Create and upload an image from that volume:

$ cinder upload-to-image 8fc9e82d-bb57-4e74-a48a-93e20c94fe2f TutorialInstance +---------------------+------------------------------------------------------ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------+ | Property | Value | +---------------------+------------------------------------------------------ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------+ | container_format | bare | | disk_format | raw | | display_description | None | | id | 8fc9e82d-bb57-4e74-a48a-93e20c94fe2f | | image_id | 83ec0ea1-e41e-475e-b925-96e5f702fba5 | | image_name | TutorialInstance | | size | 2 | | status | uploading | | updated_at | 2014-09-23T02:19:52.000000 | | volume_type | {u'name': u'block', u'qos_specs_id': None, u'deleted' : False, u'created_at': u'2014-08-08T04:04:49.000000', u'updated_at': None, u 'deleted_at': None, u'id': u'7a522201-7c27-4eaa-9d95-d70cfaaeb16a'} | +---------------------+------------------------------------------------------ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------+

Export your network UUID and image UUID:

$ export OS_IMAGE=83ec0ea1-e41e-475e-b925-96e5f702fba5 $ export OS_NET=c4beeb1d-c04d-43f4-b8fb-b485bcfcf005

Boot an instance from your new image to ensure it works:

$ nova boot --key-name $OS_USERNAME --flavor m1.tiny --block-device source=image,id=$OS_IMAGE,dest=volume,size=2,shutdown=remove,bootindex=0 --nic net-id=$OS_NET --poll Tutorial0 +--------------------------------------+-------------------------------------------------+ | Property | Value | +--------------------------------------+-------------------------------------------------+ | OS-DCF:diskConfig | MANUAL | | OS-EXT-AZ:availability_zone | MyZone | | OS-EXT-STS:power_state | 0 | | OS-EXT-STS:task_state | scheduling | | OS-EXT-STS:vm_state | building | | OS-SRV-USG:launched_at | - | | OS-SRV-USG:terminated_at | - | | accessIPv4 | | | accessIPv6 | | | adminPass | Riuvai8PvHu3 | | config_drive | | | created | 2014-09-23T02:25:14Z | | flavor | m1.tiny (1) | | hostId | | | id | ec354ce2-fed9-4196-829e-483ab7759203 | | image | Attempt to boot from volume - no image supplied | | key_name | DemoTutorial | | metadata | {} | | name | Tutorial0 | | os-extended-volumes:volumes_attached | [] | | progress | 0 | | security_groups | default | | status | BUILD | | tenant_id | djfj4574fn478fh69gk489fn239fn9rn | | updated | 2014-09-23T02:25:14Z | | user_id | hy95g85nmf72bd0esdfj94582jd82j4f8 | +--------------------------------------+-------------------------------------------------+ Server building... 100% complete Finished

Your new image should now be waiting for you to log in.

Categories: thinktime

Glen Turner: Installing OpenVSwitch and Mininet on Raspberry Pi

Tue 23rd Sep 2014 11:09
What?

OpenVSwitch is a software defined networking switch for Linux. It supports its own protocol and also OpenFlow 1.3. OpenVSwitch is included in the Linux kernel and its user-space utilities ship in Debian Wheezy.

Mininet allows the simple creation of emulated networks, using Linux's namespace feature. Mininet is not packaged in Debian Wheezy.

Raspberry Pi kernel issue #377 enables the kernel features needed by OpenVSwitch and Mininet.

Installing OpenVSwitch

Since all the necessary parts are in packages, simply install the packages:

$ sudo apt-get install ovsdbmonitor openvswitch-switch openvswitch-controller openvswitch-pki openvswitch-ipsec

The packaging is done well, and automatically establishes the necessary databases and public key infrastructure.

Installing Mininet

The main Mininet installation instructions give three choices: we are using “Option 2: installation from source”.

Before going further enable memory control groups in the kernel. Edit the line in /boot/cmdline.txt to append:

cgroup_enable=memory swapaccount=1

Reboot so that those kernel parameters take effect.

Get the source:

$ sudo apt-get install git $ git clone git://github.com/mininet/mininet

There is an installation script in mininet/utils/install.sh. It won't run successfully as Raspberry Pi doesn't keep the Linux kernel in the expected package. In any case it tries to compile OpenVSwitch as a kernel module, which is no longer needed now that OpenVSwitch is part of the stock Linux kernel.

Looking at that script we can do the steps by hand. Starting with installing the runtime dependencies:

$ sudo apt-get install build-essential iperf telnet python-setuptools cgroup-bin ethtool ethtool help2man pyflakes pylint pep8 socat

Now install Mininet into /usr/local:

$ sudo make install

Finally, test that the installation worked:

$ sudo /etc/init.d/openvswitch-controller stop $ sudo mn --test pingall *** Creating network *** Adding controller *** Adding hosts: h1 h2 *** Adding switches: s1 *** Adding links: (h1, s1) (h2, s1) *** Configuring hosts h1 h2 *** Starting controller *** Starting 1 switches s1 *** Waiting for switches to connect s1 *** Ping: testing ping reachability h1 -> h2 h2 -> h1 *** Results: 0% dropped (2/2 received) *** Stopping 1 controllers c0 *** Stopping 1 switches s1 .. *** Stopping 2 links *** Stopping 2 hosts h1 h2 *** Done completed in 6.277 seconds
Categories: thinktime

Jan Schmidt: Mysterious Parcel

Tue 23rd Sep 2014 03:09

I received a package in the mail today!

Everything arrived all nicely packaged up in a hobby box and ready for assembly.

Lots of really interesting goodies in the box!

After a little while, I’ve got the first part together.

The rest will have to wait for another day. In the meantime, have fun guessing what it is, and enjoy this picture of a cake I baked on the weekend:

See you later!

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 236: Groceries, a photo shoot, some piracy and a search for gold

Mon 22nd Sep 2014 21:09

I thought today was going to be relatively quiet, but it ended up being quite a full.

Sarah dropped Zoe around in the morning, and after some TV, we went out to do the grocery shopping, as I didn't get a chance to do it on the weekend because I was at my rock climbing course for the entirety of both days.

It was really nice doing the grocery shopping fresh on a Monday morning instead of towards the end of a Saturday or Sunday like we normally do. I love doing the grocery shopping with Zoe at the best of times, but this morning felt particularly wonderful. We always chat away about what we're buying, about how healthy stuff is, what's in stuff and that sort of thing. Zoe likes to help put stuff in the trolley and get it out and put it on the belt at the checkout.

After we got home, we made some lunch. I made a beetroot salad, which I needed to know how to make for Thermomix demonstrations, and Zoe helped. It was remarkably easy to make. I've not bothered with any of the salads in the Everyday Cookbook until today, not being a big salad eater.

Hannah Photography had had a promotional special at the Hawthorne Markets for an 11" x 11" photo on canvas, and I thought that was a great opportunity to get a nice photo with Zoe. Our shoot was booked for this afternoon, and Hannah was really keen for us to bring Smudge too. The old never work with children or animals quote immediately popped into my head, but I thought it'd be interesting to see what happened anyway.

Zoe was really excited as soon as we got to the studio, and Smudge was happy enough to go sniffing around. Pretty early into the shoot though, Smudge clawed Zoe in the leg rather badly as Zoe was trying to hold her, and I thought the whole thing was going to derail spectacularly, but Zoe recovered quickly. A packet of Jelly Belly jelly beans helped.

We had a really fun hour doing a lot of fooling around, and I'm really looking forward to seeing the results next week. Hannah sent through a sample photo later this afternoon, and she's captured a great shot of Zoe. Unfortunately, I look like I'm grimacing.

I made the most of having Smudge out in the car, and swung by the Bulimba Vet on the way home to get her microchip registered, which seemed to merely entail the vet scanning her chip (I already knew her chip ID) and writing it on a form and giving it to me to complete and lodge. I could have just got the form and done that myself. At least it only took 5 minutes, and I got to show Zoe what a pet microchip looked like.

After we got home, Zoe wanted to continue playing pirates from Friday, when it was International Talk Like a Pirate Day. I've got an eyepatch and earring that I use for such occasions. On Friday we'd made a raid on the corner store looking for chocolate gold coins, but had been unsuccessful, so today we headed out to Overflow to see if they had any. They didn't, and suggested we try K Mart. K Mart didn't either, so we had to go to Westfield Carindale to try the lolly shop there.

We finally got some at Carindale, which made the outing quite lengthy in the end and it was later than I'd have liked by the time we were heading home. We had a late dinner, but I managed to somehow make up the lost time and still get Zoe to bed a little early. She was certainly tired from the busy day, and nearly fell asleep on the way back from Carindale.

Categories: thinktime

linux.conf.au News: LCA 2015 conference schedule and prices...

Mon 22nd Sep 2014 17:09
  • The CFP went extremely well - lots of fantastic proposals
  • The Papers Committee had a hard time whittling them down to the number that we need
  • We had a great deal of fun planning the structure, then loading it into the database (although that part, not so much)
  • Now the schedule is live on the website - read ‘em and weep, my friends!

We think that we have an amazing schedule, and we have you - the LCA community to thank for that. We would have nothing if this wasn’t as important to you as it is to us.

We also have our prices set. Please see the pricing page for more information.

Very soon we will be opening registrations, and all of your LCA2015-related questions will be answered. (If not, you know how to reach us).



Yours always

The LCA 2015 team

Categories: thinktime

Mark Terle: Oh Canada!

Mon 22nd Sep 2014 01:09

Dear readers,

In my last instalment I left you having left Brisbane and arrived into Sydney ready to depart Australia.  Apologies for the lack of updates for the past few weeks, I’ve been enjoying the trip, devoting my all my brain cycles to my adventures, and spare moments to catching sleep and relaxing.

After a very long Thursday (courtesy Air Canada), was met at the other end by long time friends, A and E.   Had to remember, or be reminded, to get in the correct side of the car for Canada.  Canada not being of the 76 countries that drive on the left.   Was entertaining for the A and E to watch my reactions to being taken in traffic in the front passenger seat for the first time.

Headed off to A and E’s apartment to freshen up after the long flight.  As A famously boasts, “Closer to the airport than the nearest hotel!”.   Their apartment has a birds eye view looking out over the Vancouver Airport.  The area of Richmond that they live in is being slowly developed and turned into apartment towers.   I’m slightly jealous of the view and that it would be a nice place to spend a lazy winters afternoon looking out of the window.

Of my Vancouver experiences, two stick in my mind.

The first was ringing at my bell tower in a foreign country [1] at the Holy Rosary Cathedral.  I managed to ring there twice, once for a wedding and once for service.   Unsurprisingly, ringers are not a diverse bunch, easily spotted lurking outside towers, and fit into some stereotypes.    That said I had a great time and would love to visit them again.

The second was a trip out to the Richmond Night Markets with A, E and Z.   We worshipped at the stall supplying Rotatos (potatoes cut in a swirl on a stick and covered in cinnamon).  Yum!   Wandered past lots of other delicious food smells coming from the other vendors.   Looked at the dozens of stalls selling iPhone covers and shaking my head.   It was a great market experience.

Sadly, I had to leave Canada for the rest of my trip into the the US of A and crossed the border at of all places, Vancouver Airport.   I think I get bonus points for avoid LAX

[1] No, Queensland doesn’t count.

Categories: thinktime

Mark Terle: South of the border one day, Queensland the next

Mon 22nd Sep 2014 01:09

Arrived into Brisbane late morning on Saturday 4th August, it was great to finally get out of the chilly parts of Australia back into a nice, warm sunny part of the country.

First memorable experience of my time in Queensland was getting dragged along to a publicity sing for QUMS at the University of Queensland (UQ) Open Day.   Having participated in UWA Open Days I had some idea of what to expect.   Given it was a publicity sing and they needed all the voices they mustered, joined in and sung a lot of the usual songbook repertoire.   Several people were impressed at the sound tech controlling his rig with an iPad, and he was impressed with the volume that we made when we sang Bogoridtyse Deyvo.

I managed to also attend a couple of QUMS Rehearsals and Coffees during my extended stay in  Queensland.   The coffee at S place was enjoyable with lots of spirited post rehearsal conversation, scheming about BIV and working out QUMS fundraising ideas.  Hot dog, anyone?

Catching up with friends in Brisbane was also important.   Had lunch with R at the local golf club that is near his place, unfortunately in the electorate of that awful Campbell Newman person, but a good afternoon with chats about trains, choristers and beer.

The second lunch that was organised was going out to Brisbane’s Worst Vegetarian restaurant, the Norman Hotel, with I and colleague.  A nice T bone steak was consumed and a lot of very geeky conversation ensued and some discussion on careers.

I also got the chance to cook during one of my evenings in Brisbane.  I’ve grown quite fond of cooking bangers and mash.

Celebrated K’s birthday by heading out to dinner at Southbank.   The food was excellent and was the company.

Lots of ringing, rehearsals, service and even a quarter peal behind.  I’m looking forward to visiting more towers later in London.  I, K and M were excellent company during my ringing in Brisbane.

The second weekend in Brisbane was spent with a trip up to Mount Tambourine with S and K to eat lunch at the Fox and Hounds.   A very good faux English Pub   The trip also involved a wander around the markets, buying avocados, eating cheese, drinking beer and purchasing some very sinful fudge.

Packing and preparing for the overseas trip became the focus of the last few days in Brisbane.  I’m growing more accustomed to travelling with less, but there were decisions to be made about what ended up getting packed in the back pack and what got left behind.     This also meant the end of the driving trip across Australia, I’d covered somewhere around 7000 km (will need to check fuel records) over the length of the whole journey.    I don’t think I’ll undertake another long drive for a while again, although I’ll need to head down to Busselton for my school reunion when I get back to Australia.

Driving around Brisbane was much nicer than Sydney or Melbourne, just as long as you get the right exit and don’t disappear off onto the Inner City Bypass…. 25 minutes later ….. anyhow, hills are still exciting for a flat town person like me.

Woke up on the morning of the 16th August and took the taxi out to Brisbane Airport.   A mixture of sadness at leaving Brisbane with the excitement of heading onwards to Vancouver for the first leg of my international trip.  The trip down to Sydney with Qantas was uneventful but otherwise enjoyable.   I’ll leave off here and will continue to write about the next part of my trip in another post.

 

Categories: thinktime

Mark Terle: The United States of New South Wales

Mon 22nd Sep 2014 01:09

This blog entry has taken some time to put together and write up as other things have been keeping me occupied and enough time for reflective thoughts and writing has been proving elusive.

Drove out of Sydney heading out into regional New South Wales with a mission to get to Parkes in one day.  This is only 400 or so kilometres.  On WA roads, it would be easily achievable and quickly.   I managed it however, but NSW does have a different idea of what a highway is.

Passed through Bathurst, on the way to Parkes, indulged my inner motor head and drove around the Mt Panorama circuit.   Head onwards to Orange and then continued to Parkes.

My GPS decided to take me the dirt track way to get to the telescope and managed to arrive about fifteen minutes before closing at the gift shop.  Took some photos, bought some merchandise and indulged the geek in me.  Collected some geeky telecommunications photos too.   I’m a bit sad that I arrived there several days early, I think it would have been a much more exciting time as the Curiousity Rover was landing.

Returned to Orange for the evening and caught up with J and her band of ringers at Holy Trinity.   A very fun ring with some practice of call changes.   J and her husband put me up overnight which I was thankful for.

It would have been remiss of me to visit Orange without going and seeing B M OAM.   Had a lovely cuppa with him and chatted about all things choral and IV, and then let him return to his home renovations.

Drove onwards and arrived just after dusk in Tamworth.   Found a motel to stay in, after some confusion with the GPS, and settled for the night.   The meal at the restaurant attached was notable for its blandness.

The next day started with a visit to the Big Guitar and was then onwards through Armidale, down the side of the mountain at Dorrigo to Bellinen, a cut across inland to Varley and then onwards to Coffs Harbour.

The motel at Coffs Harbour felt like something out of survivor, but it had a stove and I took the opportunity to cook for myself for a change whilst travelling.   In the morning, the Big Banana was visited and then onwards to Bryon Bay.

Byron Bay reminded me very much of Margaret River, however with something mildly wrong and much more exploitative of the tourist.  In quaint country town style I had arrived on the day of the Coffs Cup and some stores that I wished to use were closed.   Egads!

At K’s suggestion, went and wandered up to the lighthouse and looked out into the Pacific Ocean.  Wandered down the hill to the most easterly point of the Australian continent.   I then head back into town and found a nice BnB with the most blue room ever to stay for the night.

The next day was the final major driving leg of this trip to Brisbane, and crossing the border into Queensland.

Returning back to the topic of this post, one of my favourite bits of trivia about the east cost of Australia (as opposed to Western Australia) is that Tasmania, South Australia, Victoria, Queensland and the ACT were all part of New South Wales at some point in their history.

Driving around the east coast of Australia you can see this influence, both current and historic, of Sydney and New South Wales pervade the built environment and culture.

As I crossed the mountains outside of Sydney and got back onto the plane, the areas there felt like a completely different state.   Victoria, now in comparison, seems lost elsewhere in time.   Canberra and ACT seem schizophrenic, not knowing if they want to be New South Wales or Victoria.

I’ve enjoyed seeing the bits of Australia in between and may go and visit there again.

 

 

 

Categories: thinktime

Mark Terle: Crossing the coathanger

Mon 22nd Sep 2014 01:09

Arrived Sydney late Wednesday afternoon into Paramatta.  Visited ringing practice at All Saints.  Lovely bells and a nice band, then headed onwards onto D’s place in Petersham.

Understandably snoozed a lot on the Thursday.    Friday, I first visited a contact who works for AARNet and touched based on a couple of projects that are under way and caught up with D and Q after they got home.

Saturday was catching up with geek friend, M.

A very good evening was had with L and A and their friend M.  M and her friend M also turned up.  Met A?.  A also dragged M along.  Lots of very yummy home made pizzas were made

Sunday was catching up with S and G for lunch, briefly met their son D.   Lots of change in their life with a new house and a change in employment situation.   The Sunday evening was spent with the cousins, who are always great company.

Monday night was ringing practice at St Andrews, and then Tuesday was getting back on the road again.

Crossed the harbour via the bridge and tunnel multiple times and got used to driving in Sydney… not that scary!

Categories: thinktime

Mark Terle: The woman from snowy river

Mon 22nd Sep 2014 01:09

This slightly delayed post covers Canberra.   Delayed mostly from not having very much computer time over the past few days to reconnect back into the geeksphere.

Have now done a lot of the tourist things in Canberra – National Carillion, National Portrait Gallery, National Library, Old and New Parliament Houses, Royal Australian Mint and the very solemn Australian War Memorial.   There are still a few left like the place with the miniature things.

Enjoyed wandering around the Parliament Houses and looking at the architecture.   Shall have to visit again when the House of Representatives is sitting.

Rung for service at St Pauls in Manuka.  Nice bells and a sociable bunch of ringers, including a Canberra chorister that I already knew.

Went with S and L to a bonfire over the border in New South Wales for Sunday night.  Was a fun experience on a cold winters night and had lots of yummy Vegan food.

Organised a dinner gathering on the Monday night at a cafe called Cream.  N, K, A, C, G, M, R, P, S, D, L, S all turned up throughout the course of events.  Introduced M to P and I’m sure they’ll enjoy going for motorbike rides and honing their ninja skills.  S came with myself, L and S to get soy fried ice cream elsewhere in Canberra.  It was a great experience to introduce completely (for values of Canberra) separate friends to each other and have them get along.

Departed Canberra and headed off to Jindabyne.  Saw snow again in the distance (I’m progressively getting closer…) and caught up with D.  Had some excellent Indian, chatted about life, IV and floristry     Continued heading onwards to Sydney but that is for another post….

Categories: thinktime

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