You are here

Planet Linux Australia

Subscribe to Planet Linux Australia feed
Planet Linux Australia - http://planet.linux.org.au
Updated: 1 hour 16 min ago

Russell Coker: Public Lectures About FOSS

Tue 22nd Jul 2014 18:07
Eventbrite

I’ve recently started using the Eventbrite Web site [1] and the associated Eventbrite Android app [2] to discover public events in my area. Both the web site and the Android app lack features for searching (I’d like to save alerts for my accounts and have my phone notify me when new events are added to their database) but it is basically functional. The main issue is content, Eventbrite has a lot of good events in their database (I’ve got tickets for 6 free events in the next month). I assume that Eventbrite also has many people attending their events, otherwise the events wouldn’t be promoted there.

At this time I haven’t compared Eventbrite to any similar services, Eventbrite events have taken up much of my available time for the next 6 weeks (I appreciate the button on the app to add an entry to my calendar) so I don’t have much incentive to find other web sites that list events. I would appreciate comments from users of competing event registration systems and may write a post in future comparing different systems. Also I have only checked for events in Melbourne, Australia as I don’t have any personal interest in events in other places. For the topic of this post Eventbrite is good enough, it meets all requirements for Melbourne and I’m sure that if it isn’t useful in other cities then there are competing services.

I think that we need to have free FOSS events announced through Eventbrite. We regularly have experts in various fields related to FOSS visiting Melbourne who give a talk for the Linux Users of Victoria (and sometimes other technical groups). This is a good thing but I think we could do better. Most people in Melbourne probably won’t attend a LUG meeting and if they did they probably wouldn’t find it a welcoming experience.

Also I recommend that anyone who is looking for educational things to do in Melbourne visit the Eventbrite web site and/or install the Android app.

Accessible Events

I recently attended an Eventbrite event where a professor described the work of his research team, it was a really good talk that made the topic of his research accessible to random members of the public like me. Then when it came to question time the questions were mostly opinion pieces disguised as questions which used a lot of industry specific jargon and probably lost the interest of most people in the audience who wasn’t from the university department that hosted the lecture. I spent the last 15 minutes in that lecture hall reading Wikipedia and resisted the temptation to load an Android game.

Based on this lecture (and many other lectures I’ve seen) I get the impression that when the speaker or the MC addresses a member of the audience by name (EG “John Smith has a question”) then it’s strongly correlated with a low quality question. See my previous post about the Length of Conference Questions for more on this topic [3].

It seems to me that when running a lecture everyone involved has to agree about whether it’s a public lecture (IE one that is for any random people) as opposed to a society meeting (which while free for anyone to attend in the case of a LUG is for people with specific background knowledge). For a society meeting (for want of a better term) it’s OK to assume a minimum level of knowledge that rules out some people. If 5% of the audience of a LUG don’t understand a lecture that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a bad lecture, sometimes it’s not possible to give a lecture that is easily understood by those with the least knowledge that also teaches the most experienced members of the audience.

For a public lecture the speaker has to give a talk for people with little background knowledge. Then the speaker and/or the MC have to discourage or reject questions that are for a higher level of knowledge.

As an example of how this might work consider the case of an introductory lecture about how an OS kernel works. When one of the experienced Linux kernel programmers visits Melbourne we could have an Eventbrite event organised for a lecture introducing the basic concepts of an OS kernel (with Linux as an example). At such a lecture any questions about more technical topics (such as specific issues related to compilers, drivers, etc) could be met with “we are having a meeting for more technical people at the Linux Users of Victoria meeting tomorrow night” or “we are having coffee at a nearby cafe afterwards and you can ask technical questions there”.

Planning Eventbrite Events

When experts in various areas of FOSS visit Melbourne they often offer a talk for LUV. For any such experts who read this post please note that most lectures at LUV meetings are by locals who can reschedule, so if you are only in town for a short time we can give you an opportunity to speak at short notice.

I would like to arrange to have some of those people give a talk aimed at a less experienced audience which we can promote through Eventbrite. The venue for LUV talks (Melbourne University 7PM on the first Tuesday of the month) might not work for all speakers so we need to find a sponsor for another venue.

I will contact Linux companies that are active in Melbourne and ask whether they would be prepared to sponsor the venue for such a talk. The fallback option would be to have such a lecture at a LUV meeting.

I will talk to some of the organisers of science and technology events advertised on Eventbrite and ask why they chose the times that they did. Maybe they have some insight into which times are best for getting an audience. Also I will probably get some idea of the best times by just attending many events and observing the attendance. I think that the aim of an Eventbrite event is to attract delegates who wouldn’t attend other meetings, so it is a priority to choose a suitable time and place.

Finally please note that while I am a member of the LUV committee I’m not representing LUV in this post. My aim is that community feedback on this post will help me plan such events. I will discuss this with the LUV committee after I get some comments here.

Please comment if you would like to give such a public lecture, attend such a lecture, or if you just have any general ideas.

Related posts:

  1. Sex and Lectures about Computers I previously wrote about the appropriate references to porn in...
  2. Phone Based Lectures Early this month at a LUV meeting I gave a...
  3. Car vs Public Transport to Save Money I’ve just been considering when it’s best to drive and...
Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [debian] Day 174: Kindergarten, startup stuff, tennis

Tue 22nd Jul 2014 18:07

I picked up Zoe from Sarah this morning and dropped her at Kindergarten. Traffic seemed particularly bad this morning, or I'm just out of practice.

I spent the day powering through the last two parts of the registration block of my real estate licence training. I've got one more piece of assessment to do, and then it should be done. The rest is all dead-tree written stuff that I have to mail off to get marked.

Zoe's doing tennis this term as her extra-curricular activity, and it's on a Tuesday afternoon after Kindergarten at the tennis court next door.

I'm not sure what proportion of the class is continuing on from previous terms, and so how far behind the eight ball Zoe will be, but she seemed to do okay today, and she seemed to enjoy it. Megan's in the class too, and that didn't seem to result in too much cross-distraction.

After that, we came home and just pottered around for a bit and then Zoe watched some TV until Sarah came to pick her up.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 173: Kindergarten and some Debian work

Tue 22nd Jul 2014 13:07

Zoe is still waking up on the early side, thanks to the jet lag. I think she woke up around 5am and jumped into bed with me. At least it's nice and dark.

The drop off at Kindergarten went well. Zoe was happy to see Megan again, and wasn't particularly clingy or anything. I was able to get away relatively quickly.

I spent the day getting stuck into some Debian work, and it was good to be able to use the day for its intended purpose for a change.

Megan's Dad, Jason, has a job this week that makes picking her up from Kindergarten impossible, and her parents asked me if I could pick her up on Monday and Wednesday. Zoe was very excited to have Megan come back for a play date, so I picked up both girls and brought them back home.

It was a pretty easy afternoon really. I let the girls just self-direct themselves, and they did a good job of playing on their own with minimal supervision from me. Megan had made a "portable zoo" at Kindergarten for her stuffed panda. It basically involved a shoe box and a couple of pieces of foam for bars. Her and Zoe spent a chunk of time blinging it up with Zoe's craft supplies.

Megan's Mum, Laura, picked up Megan not too long before Sarah did to pick up Zoe. Anshu arrived in the middle as well.

The jet lag is still seriously kicking my butt in the evenings. I'm hoping it will pass by tomorrow.

Categories: thinktime

linux.conf.au News: Our Call For Papers has closed

Mon 21st Jul 2014 21:07

The Call For Papers is now closed. The last 6 weeks has been very exciting as we’ve watched all of those paper submissions flow in.

To those of you who have submitted a presentation to us - good luck, and thank you! You should hear from us in September whether you have succeeded.

There are more and more wonderful things happening each day.

The LCA 2015 Auckland Team

Categories: thinktime

Francois Marier: Creating a modern tiling desktop environment using i3

Mon 21st Jul 2014 21:07

Modern desktop environments like GNOME and KDE involving a lot of mousing around and I much prefer using the keyboard where I can. This is why I switched to the Ion tiling window manager back when I interned at Net Integration Technologies and kept using it until I noticed it had been removed from Debian.

After experimenting with awesome for 2 years and briefly considering xmonad , I finally found a replacement I like in i3. Here is how I customized it and made it play nice with the GNOME and KDE applications I use every day.

Startup script

As soon as I log into my desktop, my startup script starts a few programs, including:

Because of a bug in gnome-settings-daemon which makes the mouse cursor disappear as soon as gnome-settings-daemon is started, I had to run the following to disable the offending gnome-settings-daemon plugin:

dconf write /org/gnome/settings-daemon/plugins/cursor/active false Screensaver

In addition, gnome-screensaver didn't automatically lock my screen, so I installed xautolock and added it to my startup script:

xautolock -time 30 -locker "gnome-screensaver-command --lock" &

to lock the screen using gnome-screensaver after 30 minutes of inactivity.

I can also trigger it manually using the following shortcut defined in my ~/.i3/config:

bindsym Ctrl+Mod1+l exec xautolock -locknow Keyboard shortcuts

While keyboard shortcuts can be configured in GNOME, they don't work within i3, so I added a few more bindings to my ~/.i3/config:

# volume control bindsym XF86AudioLowerVolume exec /usr/bin/pactl set-sink-volume @DEFAULT_SINK@ -- '-5%' bindsym XF86AudioRaiseVolume exec /usr/bin/pactl set-sink-volume @DEFAULT_SINK@ -- '+5%' # brightness control bindsym XF86MonBrightnessDown exec xbacklight -steps 1 -time 0 -dec 5 bindsym XF86MonBrightnessUp exec xbacklight -steps 1 -time 0 -inc 5 # show battery stats bindsym XF86Battery exec gnome-power-statistics

to make volume control, screen brightness and battery status buttons work as expected on my laptop.

These bindings require the following packages:

Keyboard layout switcher

Another thing that used to work with GNOME and had to re-create in i3 is the ability to quickly toggle between two keyboard layouts using the keyboard.

To make it work, I wrote a simple shell script and assigned a keyboard shortcut to it in ~/.i3/config:

bindsym $mod+u exec /home/francois/bin/toggle-xkbmap Suspend script

Since I run lots of things in the background, I have set my laptop to avoid suspending when the lid is closed by putting the following in /etc/systemd/login.conf:

HandleLidSwitch=lock

Instead, when I want to suspend to ram, I use the following keyboard shortcut:

bindsym Ctrl+Mod1+s exec /home/francois/bin/s2ram

which executes a custom suspend script to clear the clipboards (using xsel), flush writes to disk and lock the screen before going to sleep.

To avoid having to type my sudo password every time pm-suspend is invoked, I added the following line to /etc/sudoers:

francois ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: /usr/sbin/pm-suspend Window and workspace placement hacks

While tiling window managers promise to manage windows for you so that you can focus on more important things, you will most likely want to customize window placement to fit your needs better.

Working around misbehaving applications

A few applications make too many assumptions about window placement and are just plain broken in tiling mode. Here's how to automatically switch them to floating mode:

for_window [class="VidyoDesktop"] floating enable

You can get the Xorg class of the offending application by running this command:

xprop | grep WM_CLASS

before clicking on the window.

Keeping IM windows on the first workspace

I run Pidgin on my first workspace and I have the following rule to keep any new window that pops up (e.g. in response to a new incoming message) on the same workspace:

assign [class="Pidgin"] 1 Automatically moving workspaces when docking

Here's a neat configuration blurb which automatically moves my workspaces (and their contents) from the laptop screen (eDP1) to the external monitor (DP2) when I dock my laptop:

# bind workspaces to the right monitors workspace 1 output DP2 workspace 2 output DP2 workspace 3 output DP2 workspace 4 output DP2 workspace 5 output DP2 workspace 6 output eDP1

You can get these output names by running:

xrandr --display :0 | grep " connected"
Categories: thinktime

Dave Hall: Drupal in the Enterprise (aka Vote for my DrupalCon Session)

Mon 21st Jul 2014 20:07

TL; DR: [spam]Please vote for my DrupalCon Denver proposal on Drupal workflows in the enterprise.[/spam]

For the last few months I've been working for Technocrat on a new Drupal based site for the Insurance Australia Group's Direct Insurance brands. The current sites are using Autonomy Teamsite.

The basics of the build are relatively straight forward, around 1000 nodes, a bunch of views and a bit of glue to hold it all together. Where things get complicated is the workflow. The Financial services sector in Australia is subject to strict control of representations being made about products. The workflow system needs to ensure IAG complies with these requirements.

During the evaluation we found that generally Drupal workflows are based around publishing a single piece of content on the production site. In the IAG case a collection of nodes need to be published as a piece of work, along with a new block. These changes need to be reviewed by stakeholders and then deployed. This led us to build a job based workflow system.

We are using the Features module to handle all configuration, deploy for entities and some additional tools, including Symfony, Jenkins and drush to hold it all together.

I've proposed the session for Drupal Downunder in January and will refine the session based on feedback from there in preparation for Denver. If you want to learn more about Drupal Workflows in the Enterprise, please vote for my session.

Categories: thinktime

Dave Hall: Interacting with the Acquia Cloud API with Python

Mon 21st Jul 2014 20:07

The Acquia Cloud API makes it easy to manage sites on the platform. The API allows you to perform many administrative tasks including creating, destroying and copying databases, deploying code, managing domains and copying files.

Acquia offers 2 official clients. The primary client is a drush plugin which can only be downloaded from Acquia Insight. The other is a PHP library which states in the README that it is "[n]ot ready for production usage".

On a recent project using WF Tools we needed some pretty advanced deployment scripts for sites hosted on Acquia Cloud. We had tried using a mix of bash and PHP, but that created a maintenance nightmare, so we switched to Python.

I was unable to find a high quality Python library, so I wrote a python client for the Acquia Cloud API. The library implements all of the features that we needed, so there is a few things missing.

Chaining complex commands together is easy because the library implements a fluent interface. An extreme example of what is possible is below:

import acapi # Instantiate the client c = acapi.Client('user@example.com', 'acquia-token') # Copy the prod db to dev, make a backup of the dev db and download it to /tmp c.site('mysite').environment('prod').db('mysite').copy('dev').backups().create().download('/tmp/backup.sql.gz')

Some of the code is library is "borrowed" from the Python client for Twilio. The library is licensed under the terms of the MIT license.

I am continuing to develop the library. Consider this a working alpha. Improving error handling, creating a comprehensive test suite and implementing the missing API calls are all on the roadmap. Pull requests are welcome.

The code is PEP 8 (coding standards and PEP 257 (documentation standards) compliant and uses the numpydoc for code documentation.

Check out the Python client for Acquia's Cloud API on github.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 170: The flight back

Mon 21st Jul 2014 14:07

I have no idea if I'm getting my day numbers right any more with all the crossings of the international date line, but we'll call Friday day 170 and be done with it.

The flight back went pretty well. Zoe had a good time watching some movies, and also slept for a reasonable chunk of the flight. Zoe's cold had progressed into her typical runny nose/nasty cough combination, but neither was particularly bad. She did cough a bit in her sleep, but it didn't seem to stop her sleeping, and she was pretty happy for the duration of the flight. She was definitely impatient to land, because she knew she'd be seeing her mother.

We must have been the first flight into Brisbane on Friday morning, so we breezed through passport control quickly, and the car seat helpfully came out on the same carousel as the suitcases, so we were able to collect everything and exit quarantine relatively quickly.

Sarah met us outside, and dropped me home, and took the day off to spend with Zoe. I used the day to unpack and run a few errands.

I was super impressed with how well Zoe traveled overall. She's such a good little traveler. She's the perfect age/height for her Trunki now, and that made traversing airports at close to normal walking pace very doable. I'm also happy with how I handled solo-parent international travel. I've done a flight to Townsville with Zoe before, and a flight to Melbourne with Zoe and Anshu, but long-haul international for nearly 3 weeks is a totally different ball game, and aside from me needing to learn to pack a bit better when leaving a location (checklists, checklists, checklists!) everything went really well. The only thing I forgot to pack was my own swimwear, and that was easily fixed.

Categories: thinktime

Sridhar Dhanapalan: Twitter posts: 2014-07-14 to 2014-07-20

Mon 21st Jul 2014 00:07
Categories: thinktime

Lev Lafayette: Why Linux is the Future of Computing

Sun 20th Jul 2014 23:07

Presentation to the La Trobe Valley Linux Miniconference, Saturday July 19, 2014

Categories: thinktime

Tim Serong: The Fridge Magnets

Sun 20th Jul 2014 13:07

Last Thursday night was the TasLUG OpenStack 4th Birthday meetup. We had some nice nibbly food, some drinks, and four OpenStacky talks:

  • An update from the OpenStack Foundation (presented by me, with slides provided by the Foundation).
  • A talk about the NeCTAR cloud and using the command line tools to work with images, by Scott Bragg.
  • A talk on spinning up instances with Nova and Heat, by Stewart Wilde.
  • A talk by me on Ceph, and how it can be used as the storage backend for an OpenStack cloud.

We also had some posters, stickers and fridge magnets made up. The fridge magnets were remarkably popular. If you weren’t at TasLUG last night, and you want a fridge magnet, first download this image (the full-res one linked to, not the inline one):

Then, go to Vistaprint and place an order for Magnetic Business Cards, using this image. You can get 25 done for about $10, plus shipping.

Finally, I would like to publicly thank the OpenStack Foundation for supporting this event.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 168: Homeward bound

Sat 19th Jul 2014 21:07

It's all a bit hazy now, but I think Zoe slept all night and woke up a bit early and came down to my room. Graydon appeared not long after. I made us all breakfast and then got stuck into packing.

After we were all packed up, and Zoe and Graydon had played a bit, Neal took us to REI and Best Buy to do a spot of shopping, and then dropped us at Hertz to pick up the rental car.

After lunch, we packed up the car and headed on our way to Dallas.

The drive went really well. I'd rented some sort of Chevy SUV, and it had a nice interior, and the car radio supported Pandora and had a big display. I stuck Zoe's car seat in the middle, and she was happy being able to see out the front and also see the cover art for what Pandora was dishing up. As I hoped, she napped for a couple of hours on the way up.

The drive took about three and a half hours, and I'd wanted to stop for a break along the way, but missed the exit for the only decent looking rest stop, so pressed on.

We made it to the airport with a comfortable margin of time, and had enough time for dinner. The highlight of the evening was hearing Kim Kardashian get paged twice. Everyone looked at each other and wondered if it was that Kim Kardashian and considered going to the gate she was paged to to find out.

Our flight ended up leaving a little bit late, due to needing to unload some of the cargo to make the distance and also to ensure we didn't arrive before the 5am curfew in Brisbane airport.

Categories: thinktime

BlueHackers: Adverse Childhood Exprience (ACE) questionnaire | acestoohigh.com

Thu 17th Jul 2014 18:07

NOTE: the links referred to in this post may contain triggers. Make sure you have appropriate support available.

http://acestoohigh.com/got-your-ace-score/

There are 10 types of childhood trauma measured in the ACE Study, personal as well as ones related to other family members. Once you have your score, there are many useful insights later in the article.

The origin of this study was actually in an obesity clinic.

Categories: thinktime

Stewart Smith: OpenPower firmware up on github!

Thu 17th Jul 2014 16:07

With the whole OpenPower thing, a lot of low level firmware is being open sourced, which is really exciting for the platform – the less proprietary code sitting in memory the better in my books.

If you go to https://github.com/open-power you’ll see code for a bunch of the low level firmware for OpenPower and POWER8.

Hostboot is the bit of code that brings up the CPU and skiboot both sets up hardware and provides runtime services to Linux (such as talking to the service processor, if one is present).

Patches to https://github.com/open-power/skiboot/blob/master/doc/overview.txt are (of course) really quite welcome. It shouldn’t be too hard to get your head around the basics.

To see the Linux side of the OPAL interface, go check out linux/arch/powerpc/platforms/powernv -there you can see how we ask OPAL to do things for us.

If you buy a POWER8 system from IBM running PowerKVM you’re running this code.

Categories: thinktime

Stewart Smith: Update on MySQL on POWER8

Thu 17th Jul 2014 15:07

About 1.5 months ago I blogged on MySQL 5.6 on POWER andtalked about what I had to poke at to make modern MySQL versions run and run well on shiny POWER8 systems.

One of those bugs, MySQL bug 47213 (InnoDB mutex/rw_lock should be conscious of memory ordering other than Intel) was recently marked as CLOSED by the Oracle MySQL team and the upcoming 5.6.20 and 5.7.5 releases should have the fix!

This is excellent news for those wanting to run MySQL on SMP systems that don’t have an Intel-like memory model (e.g. POWER and MIPS64).

This was the most major and invasive patch in the patchset for MySQL on POWER. It’s absolutely fantastic that this has made it into 5.6.20 and 5.7.5 and may mean that these new versions will work out-of-the-box on POWER (I haven’t checked… but from glancing back at my patchset there was only one other patch that could be related to correctness rather than performance).

Categories: thinktime

Rusty Russell: API Bug of the Week: getsockname().

Thu 17th Jul 2014 14:07

A “non-blocking” IPv6 connect() call was in fact, blocking.  Tracking that down made me realize the IPv6 address was mostly random garbage, which was caused by this function:

bool get_fd_addr(int fd, struct protocol_net_address *addr) { union { struct sockaddr sa; struct sockaddr_in in; struct sockaddr_in6 in6; } u; socklen_t len = sizeof(len); if (getsockname(fd, &u.sa, &len) != 0) return false; ... }

The bug: “sizeof(len)” should be “sizeof(u)”.  But when presented with a too-short length, getsockname() truncates, and otherwise “succeeds”; you have to check the resulting len value to see what you should have passed.

Obviously an error return would be better here, but the writable len arg is pretty useless: I don’t know of any callers who check the length return and do anything useful with it.  Provide getsocklen() for those who do care, and have getsockname() take a size_t as its third arg.

Oh, and the blocking?  That was because I was calling “fcntl(fd, F_SETFD, …)” instead of “F_SETFL”!

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 167: Hamilton Pool and Reimers Ranch Park

Wed 16th Jul 2014 11:07

Zoe slept all night, but woke up with signs of coming down with a cold. She was also mighty grumpy. The plan had been to go swimming at Hamilton Pool today, and I was initially thinking we should skip it, but Eva pointed out it was like 100°F and it wouldn't really change much, so we stuck with the original plan.

Hamilton Pool allows a limited number of vehicles in at a time, and so Neal was aiming to be there at 9am when the park opened to guarantee we'd get in. We arrived right at the crack of 9am, and there were a few cars in front of us already, but we made it in successfully.

Zoe did really well walking down from the car park to the pool, and we swam around for a bit. It was out of my comfort zone for swimming (rocky floor, poor visibility, over my head water depth), but I swam across it anyway. It was a very beautiful pool carved out of the limestone by Hamilton Creek. There were a couple of points where the creek trickled over the edge overhead and made little showers.

After a couple of hours there, we returned to the car (Zoe again did really well hiking up) and drove to neighbouring Reimers Ranch, where we had our picnic lunch under cover while a rain shower passed over. We then walked down to the Pedernales River and had a swim around in there.

Zoe wore a life jacket at both swimming locations, and really enjoyed the independence of being able to float around in the deep water.

We had to be back home by 3pm, which we were, so it was a shorter day than yesterday, but a good one nevertheless. The inclement weather also seemed to drop the temperature by about 5 degrees Celsius, so it was a good day overall. Aside from the morning grumpies, Zoe was in a fabulous mood all day.

Categories: thinktime

James Morris: Linux Security Summit 2014 Schedule Published

Wed 16th Jul 2014 09:07

The schedule for the 2014 Linux Security Summit (LSS2014) is now published.

The event will be held over two days (18th & 19th August), starting with James Bottomley as the keynote speaker.  The keynote will be followed by referred talks, group discussions, kernel security subsystem updates, and break-out sessions.

The refereed talks are:

  • Verified Component Firmware – Kees Cook, Google
  • Protecting the Android TCB with SELinux – Stephen Smalley, NSA
  • Tizen, Security and the Internet of Things – Casey Schaufler, Intel
  • Capsicum on Linux – David Drysdale, Google
  • Quantifying and Reducing the Kernel Attack Surface -  Anil Kurmus, IBM
  • Extending the Linux Integrity Subsystem for TCB Protection – David Safford & Mimi Zohar, IBM
  • Application Confinement with User Namespaces – Serge Hallyn & Stéphane Graber, Canonical

Discussion session topics include Trusted Kernel Lock-down Patch Series, led by Kees Cook; and EXT4 Encryption, led by Michael Halcrow & Ted Ts’o.   There’ll be kernel security subsystem updates from the SELinux, AppArmor, Smack, and Integrity maintainers.  The break-out sessions are open format and a good opportunity to collaborate face-to-face on outstanding or emerging issues.

See the schedule for more details.

LSS2014 is open to all registered attendees of LinuxCon.  Note that discounted registration is available until the 18th of July (end of this week).

See you in Chicago!

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 166: The Neal Tanner tour of Austin

Wed 16th Jul 2014 07:07

Alas, Zoe woke up at about 1am very sad. I'm not sure if she woke up and was so sad because of the lack of Cowie or disorientation due to the new house, but I managed to calm her down in my room downstairs and get her to go back to bed in Graydon's room, and she slept until about 7:30am. Miraculously, she didn't seem to wake up Graydon or Wiley.

Neal had some time off, and with the au pair looking after Wiley, he was able to give Zoe and I a tour of Austin with Graydon tagging along.

First stop was the Capitol building in Austin. It was a beautiful building, bigger than the Capitol building in Washington D.C. (everything's bigger in Texas). We tacked ourselves onto the end of a tour, and broke away a couple of times to check things out at our own pace.

Unfortunately the Senate wing was closed for remodeling, and the House of Representatives was being used for a mock government thing (I learned that Texas only has a part time legislature), so we weren't able to see these wings thoroughly, but we were able to go into the public gallery of the House of Representatives while the mock government thing was happening.

Zoe and Graydon had lots of fun chasing each other around the rotunda under the dome, and no one seemed to care.

After that, we drove over to Zilker Park for a picnic lunch.

After lunch, we went into Barton Springs Pool, an underground spring-fed natural pool, for a swim. The water was a very refreshing 20°C. The bottom was a bit slippery, but manageable. Once Zoe adjusted to the breathtaking cold temperature, she was fine. It was a good day to cool off, because it got up to 37°C.

After the swim, Graydon rode his bike, and Zoe borrowed his balance bike, and we made our way along the trail that ran along the edge of Town Lake, and took in a spectacular view of downtown Austin.

It was seriously hot by this stage, and Zoe was struggling a bit, so we slowly made our way back to the car. I'd spotted a frozen custard place in our travels, so we sampled some of that on the way back home.

For dinner, Neal and I popped out to Rudy's for some more tasty BBQ take out for dinner. It was quite the experience just ordering.

Categories: thinktime

Pages