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Updated: 1 hour 8 min ago

Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Tue 20th Jan 2015 19:01

Slowly getting back into the swing of things, walked into work at stupid o’clock in the morning. Spending the afternoon at The Edge. Catching up on a few days of this diary.

Gearing up for the LCA debrief at Humbug, trying to not do it so off-the-cuff this year, organising the notes online in our wiki.



Filed under: diary
Categories: thinktime

Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Tue 20th Jan 2015 19:01

Waking up in a stupidly muggy Brisbane. Realised how happy I should be at having avoided this weather for a week.

Bussed to work, had to take have a shower when I got into work!



Filed under: diary
Categories: thinktime

Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Tue 20th Jan 2015 19:01

Windy Wellington!

Breaky and fancy coffee at..the coffee hangar I think? Then trooped back for the free Air New Zealand exhibit at Te Papa.

Headed to the airport quite early as I was completely drained by this point. The temperature and humidity levels back in Brisbane were quite confronting, I got very little sleep this night.



Filed under: diary
Categories: thinktime

Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Tue 20th Jan 2015 19:01

New Zealand!

Partook in Geeks On A Train today, from Auckland down to Wellington, quite happy with how it all went. Just about all of the photos in my LCA2015 album are taken on the train.

It was nice disconnecting from the conference and technology for a bit. And I have a feeling that the trip will be quite an important one to remember in the future.



Filed under: diary
Categories: thinktime

Michael Still: Another lunch time walk

Tue 20th Jan 2015 18:01
My arm still hurts, so no gym again. Instead, another lunch time walk although this one was shorter. The skies were dramatic, but no rain unfortunately. I found GC1DEFB during this walk.



   



Tags for this post: blog pictures 20150120-geocaching photo canberra tuggeranong bushwalk geocaching

Related posts: Lunchtime geocaching; A walk around Mount Stranger; Taylor Trig; Urambi Trig; Walk up Tuggeranong Hill; A quick walk to William Farrer's grave



Comment
Categories: thinktime

Clinton Roy: clintonroy

Tue 20th Jan 2015 18:01

Auckland!

The morning keynote really did feel like a kick in the guts to all the work that we’ve been doing, and is a horrible tail end to a conference that started with the wonderful community leadership summit. I later quipped that keynotes should be at the end of the day in case the only rational response was drinking.

Fortunately there was a light hearted Paul McKenny talk later in the day that lifted my spirits.

And on an even better note, the main organiser for Geelong is not going to put up with such shit from Linus.



Filed under: diary
Categories: thinktime

Tim Serong: ‘Sup With The Tablet?

Tue 20th Jan 2015 11:01

As I mentioned on Twitter last week, I’m very happy SUSE was able to support linux.conf.au 2015 with a keynote giveaway on Wednesday morning and sponsorship of the post-conference Beer O’Clock at Catalyst:

Very happy we’ve been able to support #lca2015 with a keynote gift & post conf drinks @SUSE pic.twitter.com/T1NKn81PG4

— Tim Serong, Esquire (@tserong) January 13, 2015

For those who were in attendance, I thought a little explanation of the keynote gift (a Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 8″) might be in order, especially given the winner came up to me during the post-conference drinks and asked “what’s up with the tablet?”

To put this in perspective, I’m in engineering at SUSE (I’ve spent a lot of time working on high availabilitydistributed storage and cloud software), and while it’s fair to say I represent the company in some sense simply by existing, I do not (and cannot) actually speak on behalf of my employer. Nevertheless, it fell to me to purchase a gift for us to provide to one lucky delegate sensible enough to arrive on time for Wednesday’s keynote.

I like to think we have a distinct engineering culture at SUSE. In particular, we run a hackweek once or twice a year where everyone has a full week to work on something entirely of their own choosing, provided it’s related to Free and Open Source Software. In that spirit (and given that we don’t make hardware ourselves) I thought it would be nice to be able to donate an Android tablet which the winner would either be able to hack on directly, or would be able to use in the course of hacking something else. So I’m not aware of any particular relationship between my employer and that tablet, but as it says on the back of the hackweek t-shirt I was wearing at the time:

Some things have to be done just because they are possible.

Not because they make sense.

 

Categories: thinktime

Michael Still: Lunchtime geocaching

Mon 19th Jan 2015 16:01
Woke up this morning with a sore left arm, which ruled out going to the gym. Instead, I decided to go for a geocaching walk at lunch time. I found these caches: GC235FM; GC56N78; GC5B9WT; GC5F6G3; and GC5F0PE. A nice walk.



         



Tags for this post: blog pictures 20150119-geocaching photo canberra tuggeranong bushwalk geocaching

Related posts: A walk around Mount Stranger; Taylor Trig; Urambi Trig; Walk up Tuggeranong Hill; A quick walk to William Farrer's grave; A quick walk to Tuggeranong Trig



Comment
Categories: thinktime

Glen Turner: Fedora: easy recovery from corrupt root partition

Mon 19th Jan 2015 13:01

When you boot Fedora with a corruption which is not automatically repaired when systemd runs fsck -a then you are asked on the console if to enter single user mode, or if to continue. If you choose to enter single user mode then you'll find that you can't run fsck /dev/md0 as the root filesystem is mounted.

Dracut has a debugging mode with named breakpoints: it will boot up to the break-point, and then dracut will drop the console into a shell.

This is useful for solving a corrupted root filesystem, we can boot up to just before the disk is mounted, breakpoint into the Dracut shell, and then run fsck on the yet-to-be-mounted root filesystem. To do this temporarily add the Dracut breakpoint parameter

dracut.break=pre-mount

to the Linux kernel.

In Fedora you do can temporarily modify the Linux kernel parameters by pressing e at the Grub bootloader prompt, arrow-ing down to the "linux" command, adding the parameter to the end of that line, and pressing F10 to run the Grub command list you see on the screen.

Dracut will load the logical volumes, assemble any RAID, and then present a shell on the console. Say fsck /dev/md0 (or whereever /etc/fstab says your / filesytem lives) and then reboot. This is a world easier than booting from a CD or USB and working out which partitions are on what logical volumes, and which logical volumes are in which RAID devices.

Breakpoints are a very fine feature of Dracut and, as this blog posting shows, very useful for solving problems which appear during the early stages of booting the machine.

Categories: thinktime

Jonathan Adamczewski: The Growth of Modern C++ Support

Mon 19th Jan 2015 11:01

 

Completing what I started here, I’ve charted the numbers from Christophe’s data for C++11, C++11 Concurrency, C++14 and C++17.

The data is taken entirely from the linked pdf with one exception: N3664 is a clarification that permits optimization, not a requirement for compliance. Compilers that do not perform this optimization are no less compliant with C++14. I’ve recomputed the percentages for all compiler versions to take this into account.

In addition to the references from the previous post, the approval date of C++14 was taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C++14

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 352: Camping again, beach time and visitors

Mon 19th Jan 2015 10:01

We were camping underneath a wattle tree, and this wattle tree seemed very popular with the rainbow lorikeets, so we were up at 5:30am, literally with the birds. Zoe was still very excited about camping.

We had a shower first, and then I cooked some bacon and eggs for breakfast before heading down to the beach. Eva and Layla were coming to visit us for the day, so I thought we could just meet them on the beach before coming back to the camp site for lunch.

Zoe had a great time playing around in the waves, and then we did some sand play, making sand castles. I showed her how she could dig down to the sea water in the sand above the wave, and we found heaps of small bivalves. Zoe thought they were pretty cool.

Eva and Layla were running a bit late, so we finished up at the beach and met them at the caravan park, where we cooked some hotdogs for lunch, before having a swim in the pool and then heading back to the beach. It was a really nice afternoon.

After they left, we took it easy for a while before going out for fish and chips for dinner and then calling it a night. Zoe was fast asleep by 7pm, despite the light outside the tent.

Categories: thinktime

Sridhar Dhanapalan: Twitter posts: 2015-01-12 to 2015-01-18

Mon 19th Jan 2015 01:01
Categories: thinktime

Sonia Hamilton: SaltStack Ubuntu Hostname

Sun 18th Jan 2015 23:01

SaltStack currently doesn’t set the hostname correctly on Debian/Ubuntu. For example, this won’t work:

system: network.system: - enabled: True - hostname: server1.example.com

Here’s a little shell script I wrote, to get around this problem:

% cat set_hostname.sh #!/bin/bash hn=$1 hostname $hn echo $hn > /etc/hostname sed -i "1s/.*/127.0.0.1 localhost $hn/" /etc/hosts

Then apply it using cmd.script, for example:

foo-hostname: cmd.script: - source: salt://soe/set_hostname.sh - args: foo.bar.com - unless: grep -q "foo.bar.com" /etc/hosts
Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 351: Camping set up

Sun 18th Jan 2015 22:01

Today was the big day. Pack up and drive to Bribie Island for two nights camping. This was the first time I've attempted camping since moving back to Australia (and being on my own). I like camping, and Zoe absolutely loves it, but I've found the idea of trying to do it all on my own a bit daunting, and it's taken me this long to get around to tackling it.

We managed to get the car packed up and be on the road by about 9:30am. Zoe was really helpful, and was able to help carry some of the lighter, less bulky stuff down to the car for me, that that was an unexpected bonus. Everything fit reasonably well with half of the back seats folded down.

We made good time getting there, and arrived at the caravan park by about 10:45am, but check in wasn't until 1:30pm, so we pottered around, and ended up back on the calm side of the island and had some lunch in the park there. After lunch, we caught up with Zoe's Great Aunty Pam for an ice cream before returning to the caravan park to check in.

We'd just started pegging down the tent when it became apparent that the very large caravan that was trying to maneuver into the site next to ours wasn't going to fit, so I offered to do a swap with them before I got any further invested in our site, so we had to pull up the tent and start over on the site next door.

This was the first time I'd put up this tent, so there was all the attendant trial and error of putting it up. I've learned all the lessons now, so I'll be better next time. Zoe was again super helpful, and we were able to put the tent up together successfully. It was ridiculously hot, and very sweaty work.

After we got the tent up, we went for a swim in the pool to cool off, before I started on dinner. The first night's dinner was just some spaghetti bolognaise. I'd pre-made the bolognaise at home and frozen it, so I just had to reheat it on the stove. The caravan park had a pretty decent camp kitchen, but I was trying to see how much I could be self-sufficient, so I did all the cooking on the gas stove I'd brought with me.

I got Zoe to bed a little bit later than normal, but she slept pretty well, despite the heat. It took me hours to get to sleep, despite being exhausted, because I found the tent uncomfortably hot. I was really happy with how the set up day had gone though, and Zoe had an absolute ball. It was totally worth all the effort.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 350: Doctor, laying low, camping preparation

Sun 18th Jan 2015 22:01

We didn't have a lot planned for the day, and given that we were embarking on a camping trip the following day, I decided to keep it that way. As it was, we still managed to have a pretty busy day.

I started the day off with a run, and managed to do 10 kilometres for the first time in ages. It was a dreadful time, but I was going for progress over perfection.

I didn't realise I had a chiropractic adjustment, so I had to go straight to the chiropractor after my run and sweat all over everything. I felt so bad, but I haven't had an adjustment since before Christmas, so it was great.

Then Sarah dropped Zoe off, and I finally got to have a shower and some breakfast. After that, we headed over to the doctor for the obligatory weekly wart freezing appointment. I think it's been the production it has been because the doctor hasn't been able to give it a really decent hit with the liquid nitrogen, but it's definitely shrinking. She was super brave and even let the doctor give it a bit of a scrape with a scalpel to take off some of the top layers of dead skin. I'm grateful that we have the relationship that we do, because she was a bit scared, but she trusted me anyway, and it all worked out fine.

On the way home, we picked up some mail from the post office. I have to resubmit one unit of my real estate licence course, because I made a mistake, but I passed the other one. I think I'm waiting for one more unit to come back.

After that, we just hung out at home until after lunch, and then went to Woolworths to do some grocery shopping. We ran into Lachlan there, and Zoe and Lachlan had a great time hanging out while we did the grocery shopping.

Instead of getting ready for camping, I decided to have a crack at baking one of the things I want to put in Zoe's school lunchbox, some Hidden Veggie Lunchbox Scrolls. They turned out pretty good, like something you'd get from Baker's Delight. The challenge now is to make space for them in the freezer.

Categories: thinktime

Michael Still: Taylor Trig

Sun 18th Jan 2015 19:01
At the top of Mount Taylor lies the first trig point defeated by a group walk I've been on. Steve * 3, Erin, Michael *2, Andrew, Cadell, Maddie, Mel, Neill and Jenny all made it to the top of this one, so I'm super proud of us as a group. A nice walk and Mount Taylor clearly has potential for other walks as well, so I am sure I'll return here again.



                 



Tags for this post: blog pictures 20150118-mount_taylor photo canberra tuggeranong bushwalk trig_point

Related posts: A walk around Mount Stranger; Urambi Trig; Walk up Tuggeranong Hill; A quick walk to Tuggeranong Trig; Wanniassa Trig; A quick walk to William Farrer's grave



Comment
Categories: thinktime

Chris Smart: Creating a DMZ in OpenWRT

Sat 17th Jan 2015 23:01

In computing, a DMZ (demilitarized zone) is a method for separating untrusted traffic from a trusted network. One of the most common implementations of this would be for supporting a publically accessible server (such as web) on a local internet connection. The server sits in the DMZ and can be accessed from the Internet, but it cannot access the trusted network.

OpenWRT probably needs no introduction, the brilliant open source and community driven Linux based embedded router stack. I run it on my Netgear WNDR3800.

Netgear WNDR3800 running OpenWRT

I have an ODRIOD-U3 (little ARM box) running Fedora, which runs a web server. This is what I want to make publicly available in my DMZ.

So, how to create a DMZ in OpenWRT? Some commercial routers have a single button “make a DMZ” and everything is handled behind the scenes for you. Not so with OpenWRT; it’s powerful, transparent, and only does what you tell it to, so we have to create it manually.

Physical devices

My router has a bunch of physical interfaces:

  • eth0 (switch)
  • eth1 (ethernet)
  • wlan0 (wireless card)
  • wlan1 (5GHz wireless card)

The eth1 device maps to the physical WAN port on the back of the router. It’s important to note that the physical interfaces may differ from router to router, depending on the chipsets.

The Switch

The switch (eth0) includes a number of ports, including the four physical ones on the back of the router, a fifth one that’s not used, as well as one that connects to the CPU.

The switch supports VLANs (virtual LANs), and by default OpenWRT puts all of those ports into VLAN 1. This means that physical connections in those four ports at the back are on the same virtual switch and are able to communicate with eachother. You can imagine that if I changed the VLAN of one of those ports to VLAN 10, that the device plugged into that port would no-longer be able to communicate with other devices on the switch. This is the basis for our DMZ.

That VLAN 1 actually creates a new interface on the router:

  • eth0.1 (VLAN 1)

The configuration of the switch (including the mapping of ports to VLANs) is available under the switch menu, Network -> Switch.

Note: The port numbers on the switch in OpenWRT do not neccessarily map in the right direction to the back of the router. In my case, port 0 on the switch is port 4 on the back of the router.

Creating a new VLAN

The first thing we want to do is create VLAN 10 and then assign one of the ports to that VLAN, removing it from VLAN 1.

  • Browse to Network -> Switch
  • Click Add to make a new VLAN entry
  • Set this new entry’s VLAN ID to 10
  • In the VLAN 1 row, change Port 0 to off
  • In the VLAN 10 row, change Port 0 to untagged
  • In the VLAN 10 row, change CPU port to tagged

Create VLAN

Setting VLAN to untagged tells the switch to add the appropriate VLAN tag to each ethernet frame as the traffic exits that port. The setting tagged means that the switch should expect that traffic leaving the port has already been tagged, perhaps by the operating system running on the device which is attached to the port.

Port 0 (port 4 on the back of the router) is now in VLAN 10, while the remaining three ports are in VLAN 1 and so it is now isolated from the others. The CPU is also in VLAN 10, else we would not be able to pass any traffic to port 0.

That new VLAN 10 creates a new interface on the router:

  • eth0.10 (VLAN 10)
Interfaces

In OpenWRT you create virtual network interfaces which map to physical devices on the router. These are available under the Network -> Interfaces menu.

For example, my router has:

  • LAN (for my internal local area network)
  • WAN (for the external Internet connection)

One or more physical devices are attached to these zones, for example in my case:

  • LAN (bridges VLAN 1 eth0.1, wlan1 and wlan0 together)
  • WAN (eth1)

The LAN bridge creates a new interface on the router:

  • br-lan (bridged LAN)
Creating a new interface

Once we have created our new VLAN, we want to create a new a interface for the DMZ. In the same way that the VLAN 1 device, eth0.1, is attached to the LAN interface, we will attach VLAN 10 device, eth0.10, to our new DMZ interface.

  • Browse to Network -> Interfaces
  • Click Add New Interface to make a new DMZ zone
  • Set the name of the new interface to DMZ
  • Leave the protocol of the new interface to static
  • Ensure bridge over multiple interfaces remains unchecked
  • For the interface, select only VLAN Interface: “eth0.10″
  • Click Submit

Create Interface

You should be presented with a new configuration screen for this interface.

  • Set IPv4 address to something in a new range different to LAN, e.g. if your LAN is 192.168.1.1 then set DMZ to 192.168.0.1
  • Leave the rest of the settings blank, you do not need to set routes, or IPv6 if you don’t want to

Interface Configuration

  • Click on the Advanced Settings tab
  • Ensure Bring up on boot is ticked
  • If you don’t want IPv6, untick Use builtin IPv6-management

Interface Configuration – Advanced

  • Click on the Physical Settings tab, should already be set to eth0.10

Interface Configuration – Physical

  • Click on the Firewall Settings tab
  • Under Create / Assign firewall-zone select unspecified -or- create and type dmz
  • Click Save and Apply

Interface Config – Firewall

  • If you want to run DHCP on your DMZ, then under DHCP Server click Setup DHCP Server button, leave default settings

Interface Config – DHCP

We now have a new interface or zone called for the DMZ that’s set to use out DMZ VLAN. It has a new firewall policy assigned to it, dmz, which we now need to configure.

Firewall

Now we need to configure the firewall to do a few things:

  • Allow the DMZ to talk to the WAN zone, so that devices can access the Internet
  • Allow the LAN zone to talk to the DMZ, but not the other way around
  • Add some traffic rules opening ports 53 and 67, so that devices from the DMZ can access DNS and DHCP services on the router’s DMZ IP address
  • Finally, forward the HTTP port (80) from external internet WAN interface onto a device in the DMZ

Let’s do zone settings first.

  • Browse to Network -> Firewall
  • Under the Zones section on General Settings page, edit the dmz zone
  • Leave the name set to dmz
  • Set input to reject, so that we drop all incoming packets by default
  • Leave output as accept, although you could set this to reject by default but you’ll require specific outgoing rules as required (like for Yum updates)
  • Leave Masquerading and MSS clamping disabled
  • Under Covered networks ensure that only dmz is selected

Firewall

  • Under the section Inter-Zone Forwarding, ensure Allow forward to destination zones is set only to WAN
  • ensure Allow forward from source zones is set only to LAN

Zone Forwarding

  • Click Advanced Settings tab
  • If you don’t want IPv6, you can set Restrict to address family to IPv4 only
  • Tick Enable logging on this zone, so that we can see what’s happening

Firewall Configuration – Advanced

Now let’s do port forwards.

  • Click on the Port Forwards tab
  • Under New port forward section, give a name, such as dmz-http
  • Set Protocol to TCP
  • Set External zone to WAN
  • Set External port to 80
  • Set Internal zone to DMZ
  • Set Internal IP address to your DMZ server, e.g. 192.168.0.100
  • Set Internal port to 80
  • Click Add when you’re happy
  • Repeat for HTTPS port 443 if you want to run a secure server

Port Forwarding

Finally, let’s finish with traffic rules.

  • Click on the Traffic Rules tab
  • Under Open ports on router, set a name like dhcp-dns
  • Under Protocol, select UDP
  • Under Port, set 53
  • Click Add
  • Find your new rule in the list and click edit
  • Set Destination address to your router’s DMZ IP address
  • Repeat for DHCP port 67 UDP if you want to use router’s DHCP server, but don’t set the destination address as DHCP is broadcast

Firewall Traffic – DHCP & DNS

If you want to be able to ping the router from the DMZ clients, do this.

  • Set a name like ping-dmz
  • Set protocol to Other
  • Click Add
  • In the new configuration page, set Protocol to ICMP
  • Set Match ICMP type to echo reply
  • Set Source zone to dmz
  • Leave Destination zone to Device (input)
  • Set Destination address to your router’s DMZ IP address
  • Click Save

Firewall Traffic – Ping

Checking the logs

Remember we told the router to log the DMZ? Well now we can monitor the firewall rules by browsing to Status -> Kernel Log. Here you should be able to see any rejects that are happening, which is useful to work out why something isn’t happening as you expect on the DMZ.

For exmaple, disable the dmz-ping rule and then try to ping the router from your DMZ server. Refresh the Kernel Log and you should see entries appear.

Testing

Plug in a device, see if it gets an IP address. Try to ping 8.8.8.8 (Google DNS server), then try to ping google.com.

Set up a web server on your DMZ box, or use netcat to listen on port 80. Get your external IP address from the router, or Google “my ip”. Now get a friend to browse to your IP and see if you see your web server.

Nice.

Categories: thinktime

Jonathan Adamczewski: The Growth of C++11 Support

Sat 17th Jan 2015 09:01

A few days ago, Christophe Riccio tweeted a link to a pdf that shows the level of support for “Modern C++” standards in four C++ compilers: Visual C++, GCC, Clang, and ICC.

One of the things I wanted to see was not just how support had advanced between versions of each compiler, but how compilers had changed relative to one another over time. I extracted the numbers for C++11 from Christophe’s document, found the release dates for each compiler, and created a chart that puts it all together.

It’s interesting to see how far behind Clang starts in comparison to the others, and that it ends up in a close dance with GCC on the way to full C++11 support. It also highlights how disappointing VC++ has been in terms of language feature advancement — particularly when VS2010 was ahead of Clang and ICC for C++11 features.

Creating the chart also served as an opportunity to play around with data visualization using Bokeh. As such, you can click on the chart above and you’ll see a version that you can zoom, pan, and resize (which is only a small part of what Bokeh offers). I intend to write about my experiences with Bokeh at a later date.

 

Release dates for each compiler were taken from the following pages:

The date used to mark the approval of the C++11 standard is taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C++11

Categories: thinktime

Chris Neugebauer: To the Future

Sat 17th Jan 2015 06:01

hobart.lca2017.org

That is all.

Categories: thinktime

Binh Nguyen: Building Reaktor Synthesisers, Download Scripts, and Re-Spin Revenue

Fri 16th Jan 2015 23:01
After a bit of fiddling I've figured out how to build non-trivial Reaktor software synthesisers. By the looks of things, you can do quite a lot but there seems to be some gaps in the software which makes building a full blown synthesiser ready for sale to the public (which they will want to buy) a non-option for the moment (unless there is some information that I'm missing which is likely the case)...



For the lazy among you the easiest Reaktor Synthesisers that can be built can be made as so. Right click in the workspace, Instrument -> Synthesizers -> Option and then hook up to correct/relevant Voice Combiner. My designs obviously start from scratch though, as I'd like to be able to design some both for educational purposes, for resale, and if that's not possible simply to give away.



You can download my updated experiments from here:https://sites.google.com/site/dtbnguyen/Multiple-Oscillator-Sawtooth-Triangle-Sine-Filter-Interface-Delay-4.enshttps://sites.google.com/site/dtbnguyen/Multiple-Oscillator-Sawtooth-Triangle-Sine-Parabol-Impulse-Pulse-Filter-Interface-Delay-5.enshttps://sites.google.com/site/dtbnguyen/Multiple-Oscillator-Sawtooth-Triangle-Sine-Parabol-Impulse-Pulse-Filter-Interface-Delay-Pan-6.enshttps://sites.google.com/site/dtbnguyen/Multiple-Oscillator-Polyphonic-Selector-Filter-Interface-Delay-Pan-7.ens

I've been looking to build some Android software applications for a while now (curious to know whether this is a viable long term option). It's interesting how many people actually Open Source their software on the various web stores.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_free_and_open-source_Android_applications

https://github.com/psaravan/JamsMusicPlayer

http://www.alexdantas.net/projects/kmp/



I recently wanted to download al the applications/archives from a particular website, http://www.vst4free.com/ so I looked at various website download programs (HTTrack, Teleport Pro, wget, curl, etc...). In spite of the filters/wildcards that were available they were too slow to be realistic.



####Start Quote####

Use wildcards to exclude or include URLs or links. You can put several scan strings on the same line. Use spaces as separators. Example: +*.zip -www.*.com -www.*.edu/cgi-bin/*.cgi



+*.png +*.gif +*.jpg +*.css +*.js -ad.doubleclick.net/*



+*.zip +*.exe +*.msi +*.tar.gz +*.tar +*.rar

+*.css +*.js -ad.doubleclick.net/*

####End Quote#####



https://www.httrack.com/html/filters.html

http://httrack.kauler.com/help/Catch_all_files_of_certain_type



What did I do? I built something because I noticed patterns in the way files were encoded.



####Start Quote####

Range for Instrument VSTs

http://www.vst4free.com/free_vst.php?id=160

http://www.vst4free.com/free_vst.php?id=362



http://www.vst4free.com/free_vst.php?id=160

was the same as

http://www.vst4free.com/free_vst.php?plugin=Advanced_MIDI_Gate&id=160

which converted to

http://www.vst4free.com/get_plugin.php?win32=drumatic_3_02.zip

which could then be parsed for automated download.



Range for Effects VSTs

http://www.vst4free.com/free_vst.php?id=401

http://www.vst4free.com/free_vst.php?id=479



http://www.vst4free.com/free_vst.php?id=401

was the same as

http://www.vst4free.com/free_vst.php?plugin=Advanced_MIDI_Gate&id=401

which converted to

http://www.vst4free.com/get_plugin.php?win32=microrock.zip

which could then be parsed for automated download.



Range for Midi VSTs

http://www.vst4free.com/free_vst.php?plugin=Hyperion&id=1401

http://www.vst4free.com/free_vst.php?plugin=Hyperion&id=1421

####End Quote#####



You can download my script from here:https://sites.google.com/site/dtbnguyen/download_date_sections.sh.zip

As I've stated previously I've been thinking of re-spinning some versions of Linux for fun and possibly profit. The irony is that it's actually much easier to go down than it is go up. Namely, the smaller distributions such as DamnSmall don't really lend themselves to customisation going up because there are too many dependencies that need to be remedied prior to being able to come up with something workable. This has led me to work on scripts to achieve the exact opposite on smaller (but large such as Knoppix) DVD/CD based live distributions. They work based on class of program based on yum or apt package information. It'll be interesting to see what we can do.

http://knoppix.net/

http://www.knopper.net/knoppix/index-en.html

http://www.knopper.net/knoppix-mirrors/index-en.html

http://www.knoppix.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knoppixhttp://knoppix.net/forum/forums/7-Customising-Remastering

smallest damn thing that you can possibly get?

http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=damnsmall

http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/

http://xpt.sourceforge.net/techdocs/nix/live/dsl/dsl07-CustomizingDSL/ar01s06.html

http://www.eng.uwaterloo.ca/twiki/bin/view/Linux/RemasteringGuide

http://www.techradar.com/au/news/software/operating-systems/8-of-the-best-tiny-linux-distros-683552

http://www.livecdlist.com/damn-small-linux

http://www.slitaz.org/en/http://puppylinux.org/main/Overview%20and%20Getting%20Started.htm

http://puppylinux.org/main/Download%20Latest%20Release.htm

Several of the ways in which I was thinking about making revenue was:
  • distributing/re-sale on chosen media such as USB, CD, DVD, etc... http://damnsmalllinux.org/usb.html
  • creating custom versions for who ever wants them. After all, if I'm currently building the code to allow for this why not? (You need to send a portion of payment now and rest on delivery.) Working perferably only on smaller distributions at this point unless the project is really interesting.
  • donations
  • figuring out what the public wants and then attempting to build that for them
  • figuring out what the best possible distribution is and attempting to build that for the public
  • support via of these distributions
Interesting stuff in general I came across during the week. http://www.ikmultimedia.com/freedownload/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vocaloid

http://www.vocaloid.com/en/

http://vocaloid.wikia.com/wiki/Vocaloid_Wiki

https://www.freesound.org/

http://www.wavsource.com/

http://www.domain.com.au/blog/australias-most-hipster-suburbs/?utm_source=outbrain&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=content
Categories: thinktime

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