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Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 63: Productive procrastination, pizza dough, podiatrist, positive

Tue 01st Apr 2014 21:04
parenting and a haircut with a spot of painting

How's that for some alliteration?

Today was a really good day. And that's before I started drinking red wine.

I got up this morning and successfully banged out a 10km run. It wasn't pretty, but I did it in under an hour, so I was happy.

I got home, and after breakfast I pretty much flopped on the couch with my laptop and procrastinated instead of doing my taxes. But it was productive procrastination. I:

  • booked flights to the US for our trip in July
  • sought some quotes for outsourcing the production of Zoe's birthday cake
  • made some pizza dough for dinner with Anshu
  • booked a haircut for Zoe and I
  • Got taken hook, line and sinker by an April Fools joke
  • found a couple of patent lawyers who will give me an initial consultation for free instead of charging me $250 plus GST (yay River City Labs)

I also (finally) got my taxes to a point where I'm ready to send them off to my US accountant and deal with the rest of it incrementally. So it was a productive day!

I had a follow up appointment with my podiatrist in the afternoon to see how my orthotics were going. I biked to Kindergarten early, ditched the bike trailer, and then biked over to the podiatrist, and made it back to Kindergarten about 10 minutes before pick up time.

Zoe was, unsurprisingly, fast asleep. I decided to try applying sunscreen to her while she was asleep as a way of killing two birds with one stone. I got as far as getting her legs done before she woke up and had a massive meltdown. Poor kid really doesn't deal well with being woken up. One of the teachers took pity on us and distracted Zoe by letting her cuddle one of the baby chicks, which snapped her out of it for the duration, but she had another meltdown once it was over.

Another teacher gave her a cuddle for a bit, and she eventually calmed down enough for me to get sunscreen on her arms. I'd foolishly left the bike trailer separated from the bike, so I had to drag the trailer back to the bike, whilst carrying Zoe. Fortunately another teacher took sympathy on us and helped me with the trailer. Turns out trying to drag a single-wheeled trailer single-handed whilst carrying a toddler and having excess sunscreen on my hands is extremely difficult.

We finally got the trailer on the bike, and Zoe in the trailer, and headed towards home. Zoe's ballerina pumps aren't great on the bike because the straps on the pedals cross the tops of her exposed feet and irritate her, so there were multiple meltdowns on the way home, culminating in needing to go to the toilet "right now" before we got home. I stopped at the health food shop on the way home, to see if they had a toilet we could use. Luckily I'm a customer and the naturopath let us use the toilet in the clinic. Zoe had another meltdown in there, announcing she "didn't like being woken up". Poor kid. It wasn't a good afternoon for her. I'm just glad I was in a sufficiently good mood to be able to deal with it all in a satisfactorily positive parenting way.

We finally made it home, and I'd promised her we could have a big cuddle on the couch once we got home, so we did that and read a library book, and then it was time to head to the hairdressers for our haircuts.

We started out on foot, and had made it one block from home, and she saw another kid on a scooter and announced she wanted to ride her scooter too. Initially tried saying we couldn't do it this time, because we'd be late, but she was on the verge of having another meltdown, so I capitulated, and we went back and grabbed it. I'm actually really glad I did, because she was as happy as Larry from that point on, and we were only a couple of minutes late at the hairdresser.

We did her fringe trim first, and then she had a great play in the kid's corner while I got my haircut. She even cleaned up the corner better than she found it without argument.

We then had plenty of time to scooter back home, so I decided to check out the 'OO'niverse Family Cafe, which is next door to the Hawthorne Cinemas. It's this thing I've never gotten around to checking out, and it was the second thing I was glad I did this afternoon. It's not a big place, and it was super quiet. There was just us and two twin Kindergarten-aged girls being babysat. Zoe had a banana milkshake and got a dolphin painted on her arm and a balloon dog made, and I had a coffee and we just chilled out for a bit while I chatted with the owner (who was babysitting the twins).

By this stage Anshu was already at my place, and Sarah wasn't far off leaving work to pick up Zoe, so we made our way back home. Zoe had a great time playing with Anshu until Sarah arrived.

So I was basically really happy that I managed to turn around a massively molten afternoon and give Zoe a really good afternoon instead.

Anshu and I then proceeded to made a couple of really fantastic pizzas. I really love my Thermomix. I made the pizza dough earlier today, and tonight I made some pizza sauce, some pesto sauce and caramelized some onions in it, and we were still done with dinner by 8pm.

Categories: thinktime

Michael Fox: More Simpana 10 content

Tue 01st Apr 2014 19:04

I was asked to write up a MySQL related post on how to backup MySQL with the Simpana 10 MySQL iDA and how to configure a test machine.

I am currently working on this and should be posting it in the next month, so keep an eye out. It will follow along the same lines as the PostgreSQL one I posted earlier. As seen here.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] My girlfriend's name is Anshu

Tue 01st Apr 2014 11:04

I've been referring to Anshu as "my girlfriend" in all my blog posts because I haven't gotten around to writing this post yet. I've finally gotten around to it.

Anshu and I met at a speed dating event 8 months ago. I quite enjoyed the speed dating experience, and having done it, would prefer it over Internet dating. I think it helped that at the time I was working from home, getting above and beyond the amount of alone time that my introversion required for me to recharge, so I was in the right frame of mind for it. I did pretty well, I got 6 matches from the night, one of which was Anshu.

Anshu is an Indian-Australian dual national. She emigrated about 12 years ago to do her Masters degree here, and decided to stay. This is my first inter-ethnic relationship, and it's been a very interesting expansion of my cultural horizons.

Anshu is vegetarian, so I've expanded my vegetarian cooking repertoire significantly since we've been seeing each other. I already do "Meatless Monday" with Zoe, so it wasn't that difficult a transition for me.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 62: Kindergarten, cleaning

Mon 31st Mar 2014 23:03

Zoe slept really well last night, and had a good breakfast of porridge this morning. We biked to Kindergarten for the first time in ages, as it wasn't raining. Drop off went nice and smoothly. I can't believe this is the last week of term 1 already.

Today was an exceptional day, because Sarah had the day off, and picked up Zoe from Kindergarten instead of me. As tonight Zoe is with her, I got about 3 extra hours up my sleeve. The house was a bit of a mess, I decided to switch today with my Wednesday "clean the house day" and use the extra time to do a more thorough clean.

Part way through that, an acquaintance, who recently separated from his wife, dropped by for a chat. We ended up chatting for about 3 hours, so I dialed back my cleaning to something more standard.

My business debit card arrived in the mail today. It was exciting to see something with my name and my company name on it. I've scheduled a bank transfer to fund my business with the first loan I'll be making to it, so it'll have some cash as of the start of second quarter. All I need now is the cheque book to arrive, and I can go pay the patent lawyer a visit.

I had contemplated going for a run tonight before my yoga class, but I ended up faffing around with trying to fix the song order on the USB stick that has all of Zoe's music on it. The new head unit isn't playing one album in the right order, and it's phenomenally annoying. To this end, I discovered fatsort, which is a godsend.

Yoga was in the new studio tonight for the first time. I'm really happy that my teacher is growing her business. The new studio is even closer to home than the old one, which is lovely.

Categories: thinktime

Russell Coker: Links March 2014

Mon 31st Mar 2014 22:03

Typing Animal wrote an interesting article about the dangers of stainless steel in a medical environment [1]. Apparently silver and copper are best due to the oligodynamic effect. Instead of stainless steel drinking bottles they should sell silver plated drinking bottles for kids, I’m sure that lots of parents would pay extra for that.

Mark Kendall gave an interesting TED talk about a replacement for the hypodermic syringe in vaccinations [2]. His invention can reduce the cost of immunisation while increasing the effectiveness and avoiding problems with people who have a needle phobia.

The TED blog has an interesting interview with Will Potter about the use of the “war on terror” to silence journalists and the invention of the term “eco terrorism” for non-violent people who are politically active [3].

The TED blog has an interesting article by Kate Torgovnick May about designing products for sustainability [4]. It links to an insightful TED talk by Leyla Acaroglu about some of the complex issues related to sustainability [5].

Manoush Zomorodi wrote an informative article about How one college went from 10% female computer-science majors to 40% [6].

Slate has an interesting article by Jamelle Bouie showing the way that support for capital punishment in the US is linked to racism [7].

The Southern California Public Radio blog has an interesting article by Josie Huang about Suey Park and her success in using twitter to oppose racism [8].

Andrew Solomon wrote an insightful interview with the father of Adam Lanza for the New Yorker [9].

Waleed Aly wrote an insightful article about George Brandis’ attempt to change the Racial Discrimination Act specifically to allow Andrew Bolt to be racist [10]. He describes it as “the whitest piece of proposed legislation I’ve encountered” which is significant in a country with as much racism as Australia. Really we need stronger laws against racism, there should be no right to be bigoted.

A German Court has ruled that “non commercial” licenses don’t permit non-commercial organisations to re-publish material [11]. This seems bogus to me, I’d be happy to have my non-commercial licensed work published by a non-commercial publishing organisation – just as long as they don’t run adverts on the page.

Professors Woolley and Malone wrote an interesting article about their research into group performance, apparently having more women in a group improves the collective intelligence of a group, but having smarter men in the group doesn’t [12].

Susie Hill wrote an article about the SPARX computer game that is designed to treat adolescent depression [13]. They are working on a “rainbow” edition for GLBT kids and a version for Maoris. Unfortunately their web site is down right now and the version at archive.org says that it’s currently only available to participants in a clinical trial.

Tim Chevalier wrote an insightful article explaining why people who campaign against equality shouldn’t be given senior positions in corporations [14].

Zeynep Tufekci wrote an insightful article about how French High Theory and Dr. Seuss can help explain gender problems in geek communities [15].

Hannah Levintova wrote an informative article for Mother Jones about how the US based hate group the World Congress of Families incites homophobic violence in Russia [16].

Josh Sanburn wrote an article for Time about people in the Deep South who claim to be Christian giving away guns to encourage people to attend church [17]. This is the same part of the world where people who claimed to be Christian used their “religion” as an excuse for supporting slavery. I’m quitting bourbon, too much evil comes from that part of the world and I’m not buying anything that comes from there.

Related posts:

  1. Links March 2013 Russ Allbery wrote an informative post about how to determine...
  2. Links February 2014 The Economist has an interesting and informative article about the...
  3. Links January 2014 Fast Coexist has an interesting article about the art that...
Categories: thinktime

Sridhar Dhanapalan: Twitter posts: 2014-03-24 to 2014-03-30

Mon 31st Mar 2014 01:03
Categories: thinktime

Anthony Towns: Bitcoincerns

Mon 31st Mar 2014 00:03

Bitcoincerns — as in Bitcoin concerns! Get it? Hahaha.

Despite having an interest in ecash, I haven’t invested in any bitcoins. I haven’t thought about it any depth, but my intuition says I don’t really trust it. I’m not really sure why, so I thought I’d write about it to see if I could come up with some answers.

The first thing about bitcoin that bothered me when I first heard about it was the concept of burning CPU cycles for cash — ie, setup a bitcoin miner, get bitcoins, …, profit. The idea of making money by running calculations that don’t provide any benefit to anyone is actually kind of offensive IMO. That’s one of the reasons I didn’t like Microsoft’s Hashcash back in the day. I think that’s not actually correct, though, and that the calculations being run by miners are actually useful in that they ensure the validity of bitcoin transfers.

I’m not particularly bothered by the deflationary expectations people have of bitcoin. The “wild success” cases I’ve seen for bitcoin estimate their value by handy wavy arguments where you take a crazy big number, divide it by the 20M max bitcoins that are available, and end up with a crazy big number per bitcoin. Here’s the argument I’d make: someday many transactions will take place purely online using bitcoin, let’s say 75% of all transactions in the world by value. Gross World Product (GDP globally) is $40T, so 75% of that is $30T per year. With bitcoin, each coin can participate in a transaction every ten minutes, so that’s up to about 52,000 transactions a year, and there are up to 20M bitcoins. So if each bitcoin is active 100% of the time, you’d end up with a GWP of 1.04T bitcoins per year, and an exchange rate of $28 per bitcoin, growing with world GDP. If, despite accounting for 75% of all transactions, each bitcoin is only active once an hour, multiply that figure by six for $168 per bitcoin.

That assumes bitcoins are used entirely as a medium of exchange, rather than hoarded as a store of value. If bitcoins got so expensive that they can only just represent a single Vietnamese Dong, then 21,107 “satoshi” would be worth $1 USD, and a single bitcoin would be worth $4737 USD. You’d then only need 739k bitcoins each participating in a transaction once an hour to take care of 75% of the world’s transactions, with the remaining 19M bitcoins acting as a value store worth about $91B. In the grand scheme of things, that’s not really very much money. I think if you made bitcoins much more expensive than that you’d start cutting into the proportion of the world’s transactions that you can actually account for, which would start forcing you to use other cryptocurrencies for microtransactions, eg.

Ultimately, I think you’d start hitting practical limitations trying to put 75% of the world’s transactions through a single ledger (ie hitting bandwidth, storage and processing constraints), and for bitcoin, that would mean having alternate ledgers which is equivalent to alternate currencies. That would involve some tradeoffs — for bitcoin-like cryptocurrencies you’d have to account for how volatile alternative currencies are, and how amenable the blockchains are to compromise, but, provided there are trusted online exchanges to convert one cryptocurrency into another, that’s probably about it. Alternate cryptocurrencies place additional constraints on the maximum value of bitcoin itself, by reducing the maximum amount of GWP happening in bitcoin versus other currencies.

It’s not clear to me how much value bitcoin has as a value store. Compared to precious metals, is much easier to transport, much easier to access, much less expensive to store and secure. On the other hand, it’s much easier to destroy or steal. It’s currently also very volatile. As a store of value, the only things that would make it better or worse than an alternative cryptocurrency are (a) how volatile it is, (b) how easy it is to exchange for other goods (liquidity), and (c) how secure the blockchain/algorithms/etc are. Of those, volatility seems like the biggest sticking point. I don’t think it’s unrealistic to imagine wanting to store, say, $1T in cryptocurrency (rather than gold bullion, say), but with only 20M bitcoins, that would mean each bitcoin was worth at least $50,000. Given a current price of about $500, that’s a long way away — and since there are a lot of things that could happen in the meantime, I think high volatility at present is a pretty plausible outcome.

I’m not sure if it’s possible or not, but I have to wonder if a bitcoin based cryptocurrency designed to be resistant to volatility would be implementable. I’m thinking (a) a funded exchange guaranteeing a minimum exchange rate for the currency, and (b) a maximum number of coins and coin generation rate for miners that makes that exchange plausible. The exchange for, let’s call it “bitbullion”, should self-fund to some extent by selling new bitbullion at a price of 10% above guidance, and buying at a price of 10% below guidance (and adjusting guidance up or down slightly any time it buys or sells, purely in order to stay solvent).

I don’t know what the crypto underlying the bitcoin blockchain actually is. I’m surprised it’s held up long enough to get to where bitcoin already is, frankly. There’s nominally $6B worth of bitcoins out there, so it would seem like you could make a reasonable profit if you could hack the algorithm. If there were hundreds of billions or trillions of dollars worth of value stored in cryptocurrency, that would be an even greater risk: being able to steal $1B would tempt a lot of people, being able to destroy $100B, especially if you could pick your target, would tempt a bunch more.

So in any event, the economic/deflation concerns seem assailable to me. The volatility not so much, but I’m not looking to replace my bank at the moment, so that doesn’t bother me either.

I’m very skeptical about the origins of bitcoin. The fact it’s the first successful cryptocurrency, and also the first definitively non-anonymous one is pretty intriguing in my book. Previous cryptocurrencies like Chaum’s ecash focussed on allowing Alice to pay Bob $1 without there being a record of anything other than Alice is $1 poorer, and Bob is $1 richer. Bitcoin does exactly the opposite, providing nothing more than a globally verifiable record of who paid whom how much at what time. That seems like a dream come true for law enforcement — you don’t even have to get a warrant to review the transactions for an account, because everyone’s accounts are already completely public. Of course, you still have to find some way to associate a bitcoin wallet id with an actual person, but I suspect that’s a challenge with any possible cryptocurrency. I’m not quite sure what the status of the digicash/ecash patents are/were, but they were due to expire sometime around now (give or take a few years), I think.

The second thing that strikes me as odd about bitcoin is how easily it’s avoided being regulated to death. I had expected the SEC to decide that bitcoins are a commodity with no real difference to a share certificate, and that as a consequence they can only be traded using regulated exchanges by financial professionals, or similar. Even if bitcoins still count as new enough to only have gotten a knee-jerk regulatory response rather than a considered one (with at $500 a pop and significant mainstream media coverage, I doubt), I would have expected something more along the lines of “bitcoin trading is likely to come under regulation XYZ, operating or using an unregulated exchange is likely to be a crime, contact a lawyer” rather than “we’re looking into it”. That makes it seem like bitcoin has influential friends who aren’t being very vocal in public, and conspiracy theories involving NSA and CIA/FBI folks suggesting leaving bitcoin alone for now might help fight crime, seem more plausible than ones involving Gates or Soros or someone secretly creating a new financial world order.

The other aspect is that it seems like there’s only really four plausible creators of bitcoin: one or more super smart academic types, a private startup of some sort, an intelligence agency, or a criminal outfit. It seems unlikely to me that a criminal outfit would create a cryptocurrency with a strong audit trail, but I guess you never know. It seems massively unlikely that a legitimate private company would still be secret, rather than cashing out. Likewise it seems unlikely that people who’d just done it because it seemed like an interesting idea would manage to remain anonymous still; though that said, cryptogeeks are weird like that.

If it was created by an intelligence agency, then its life to date makes some sense: advertise it as anonymous online cash that’s great for illegal stuff like buying drugs and can’t be tracked, sucker in a bunch of criminals to using it, then catch them, confiscate the money, and follow the audit trail to catch more folks. If that’s only worked for silk road folks, that’s probably pretty small-time. If bitcoin was successfully marketed as “anonymous, secure cryptocurrency” to organised crime or terrorists, and that gave you another angle to attack some of those networks, you could be on to something. It doesn’t seem like it would be difficult to either break into MtGox and other trading sites to gain an initial mapping between bitcoins and real identities, or to analyse the blockchain comprehensively enough to see through most attempts at bitcoin laundering.

Not that I actually have a problem with any of that. And honestly, if secret government agencies lean on other secret government agencies in order to create an effective and efficient online currency to fight crime, that’s probable a win-win as far as I’m concerned. One concern I guess I have though, is that if you assume a bunch of law-enforcement cryptonerds build bitcoin, is that they might also have a way of “turning it off” — perhaps a real compromise in the crypto that means they can easily create forks of the blockchain and make bitcoins useless, or just enough processor power that they can break it by bruteforce, or even just some partial results in how to break bitcoin that would destroy confidence in it, and destroy the value of any bitcoins. It’d be fairly risky to know of such a flaw, and trust that it wouldn’t be uncovered by the public crypto research community, though.

All that said, if you ignore the criminal and megalomaniacal ideas for bitcoin, and assume the crypto’s sound, it’s pretty interesting. At the moment, a satoshi is worth 5/10,000ths of a cent, which would be awesome for microtransactions if the transaction fee wasn’t at 5c. Hmm, looks like dogecoin probably has the right settings for microtransactions to work. Maybe I should have another go at the pay-per-byte wireless capping I was thinking of that one time… Apart from microtransactions, some of the conditional/multiparty transaction possibilities are probably pretty interesting too.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew McDonnell: OpenWRT WDS between legacy WRT54G and recent TP-Link devices

Sun 30th Mar 2014 22:03
For a while now I had a multiple wifi routers all providing access points, and a connection to each other, using a feature called WDS. All of the routers run OpenWRT. Recently one of them died and everything kind of stopped working properly. I actually had the following configuration: TP-LINK <--wired,bridged--> ASUS WL500G <--wireless,WDS,bridged--> Linksys […]
Categories: thinktime

Michael Fox: Additional backyard work

Sun 30th Mar 2014 18:03

Went on to complete the backyard work, and sort out another area down the side of the house. I just need to circle back and fix up some drainage which I will do in the next few weeks, as I can’t make a mess of the backyard until after my sons birthday party. So will get stuck into fixing that in the next 2-3 weeks. I put some posts in on the side of the house so we can use it to block the dog down the side when we have events on in the backyard. It also keeps out from running down that side of the house when it’s wet and destroying it.

A few more pictures below;

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 59: Rain, BJJ, play cafe, bunk beds and a car wash

Fri 28th Mar 2014 23:03

Today was another wet day. Sarah dropped Zoe around in the morning, and she watched a little bit of TV before we drove to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu class. My cycling fitness is going to go completely to hell.

Zoe's really taken to her teacher, Patrick. The classes have pretty much been just Zoe and I on Friday's, with the occasional other kids, and so she's formed a pretty close relationship with her teacher. The last few weeks, Zoe's really liked to help Patrick set up and tidy up the space before and after the classes. She loves to tell Patrick about what's been going on in her life. It's really sweet to watch. Today there was another 3 year old boy, but he was much less focused than Zoe.

I will miss the classes, because I've seen real self-defense value in what they've been teaching. For proper comparison, I should see tae kwon do clases as well, but currently I'd be pretty happy with what I've seen taught in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. I can see the practical application of it. We're going to go watch Patrick compete in May, and I'm looking forward to seeing some adult-level stuff.

Megan's Dad was looking for something to do with his kids, so I suggested we meet at Lollipops Playland & Cafe in Cannon Hill after BJJ class. We were a bit late in getting there, mostly because Zoe wanted to hang around after class for a bit, but we got there eventually, and Zoe and Megan had a great time.

We stayed for lunch and the girls played a bit more. It's the first time I've used a play cafe since coming back to Australia, and I found it almost overwhelmingly loud and busy. These places must love it when it rains. It was nice that Zoe's at an age now where she can go off and play on her own. Having Megan there was a great help in that regard, but the girls did keep losing each other, although that wasn't a big problem for either of them.

While we were at the play cafe, I received an email saying that the Kindergarten working bee for tomorrow had been canceled on account of the wet weather, so that's opened up our Saturday significantly.

After that, we headed down to Bunkers to place the order for the bunk bed I want to get Zoe for her birthday. I'd expected with all the morning's activities, for her to pass out in the car immediately, but surprisingly she lasted the distance, and had a great time sampling all the different bunk beds at the store.

Even on the way back home, it took her a little while to fall asleep, so I extended the car ride by driving around the Port of Brisbane to see how much there was to see that might be interesting for Zoe when she's awake.

After that, we went to the car wash to get the car cleaned, because it's been a while. Zoe had a babyccino and we sorted through the DreamWorks cards we'd traded with Megan that morning.

It was time for dinner after the car wash, so we headed home, and Zoe watched some TV while I prepared dinner.

At bath time, I realised that we hadn't had time to do anything for Science Friday. Yesterday at Bunnings I bought a roll of clear tubing for the heck of it, so we made a siphon in the bath. Zoe thought the tube was great fun, and had a good time blowing bubbles in the bath with it. Tomorrow we'll have to use some bubble bath for added entertainment.

Bedtime went smoothly enough.

Categories: thinktime

Michael Fox: Simpana 10 – PostgreSQL 8.4 backup on CentOS Linux 5.10 x64 – example

Fri 28th Mar 2014 20:03

I am going to assume that this is a test deployment and as such will expect that you have installed your CentOS 5.10 x64 Linux the way you want it, and I will follow on from that point on what I needed to perform to get the distribution release of PostgreSQL to work with Simpana 10 PostgreSQL iDA to perform a backup. Of course some assumed knowledge present.

  1. Install the postgresql packages onto your  CentOS client.

    $ sudo yum install postgresql84 postgresql-server postgresql-devel
  2. Startup postgresql server for the first time, you need to run initdb switch instead of start for the first time only.
  3. $ sudo service postgresql initdb
  4. We should also enable the service to run at boot moving forward

    $ sudo chkconfig postgresql on
  5. Before we change the authentication method below, we need to set a password that we know for the postgres user in the postgresql database. To perform this we need to change to the postgres user and connect to postgresql database and update the password for the user to something we know.

    $ sudo su -

    # su – postgres

    $ psql
  6. Now at the postgres prompt update the password for the postgres user, unless you want to make your own. Won’t discuss how, just going to show how to set postgresql user password. Be sure to remember what you set the password too, it will be required later on.

    postgres=# ALTER USER postgres WITH PASSWORD ‘password’;

    ALTER ROLE

    postgres=#\q
  7. Postgresql packages distributed with CentOS don’t use md5 password authentication, it defaults to peer/ident based authentication. In this example we will flip this to md5 based authentication, and we will touch on a peer/ident based authentication example in a later post. Perform the changes below to enable md5 authentication.

    $ cd /var/lib/pgsql/data

    $ sudo vi pg_hba.conf

    Find the line at the bottom of the file that looks like the one below;

    local     all     all                ident

    You need to change this to have md5 on the end, i.e. replace ident to be md5 instead. Save the changes.
  8. Now restart postgresql for the changes to take effect. (required)

    $ sudo service postgresql stop

    $ sudo service postgresql start
  9. Now you can test that this has worked by execution as root the command below, and when prompted for the postgres user password authenticate using the password set in step 6.

    # psql -U postgres

    If it worked, you will get the famous postgres=# prompt, in which you can enter \q [enter] to quit it.
  10. Next up we now need to enable archive logs. We need to edit the postgres.conf file which on CentOS rpm based install is /var/lib/pgsql/data and the lines we need to add in the Archiving section is below;

    archive_mode = on

    archive_command = ‘cp %p /var/postgresql/archive/%f’

    Save those additions and move on below.
  11. Make sure to create the folders/destination used in the archive_command above and ensure postgres user can write to it etc.
  12. Now restart postgresql for the changes to take effect. (required)

    $ sudo service postgresql stop

    $ sudo service postgresql start
  13. Install the Simpana PostgreSQL iDA.
  14. Once installed refresh the Simpana Console and attempt to create your PostgreSQL instance. See the dialog below for the values I used in this configuration. Of course the username is the postgres user and password we configured in step 6. Note the archive log directory is the one we used in the archive_command string at step 10 too.

  15. If everything goes to plan you should have your instance created and now you can do configuration against the DumpBaseBackupSet subclient and/or FSBasedBackupSet subclient. For the difference between what each does, I recommend you review the documentation. As each backupset has its own unique capabilities. See the bottom of the Backup documentation page for explanations.
  16. Assign a Storage Policy to each subclient and run a backup of each to confirm it works.

CommVault Documentation references:

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 58: Playgroup, rain and errands

Thu 27th Mar 2014 23:03

My yoga teacher was out sick this morning. I had grand plans of instead biking to the pool and going for a swim, but when my alarm went off, and the weather outside was grey and miserable, having an extra half an hour lie in seemed more attractive. I think I made the right choice, because I felt like a million bucks today.

I did all of the preparation to bake a batch of carrot and kale muffins before Zoe arrived, and we baked a batch as soon as she arrived and had them out of the oven in time to drive to Playgroup. I was expecting a larger crowd today on account of the wet weather, but it turned out quite the opposite. That said, Zoe still had a good time. There's really no other kids her age though, so it's still winding up as a "play with Dad in a different environment".

My ABN came through yesterday, so after Playgroup we walked to the bank to give it to them and sort out a business credit card. Zoe was super well behaved while I did that, so we grabbed a fresh hot cross bun from Brumby's across the street afterwards.

I needed some more stamps, so I figured we could just walk down to the post office down the other end of Oxford Street while we were there. That was slow going, but Zoe was enjoying walking with her umbrella in the rain. We got to the post office, and I discovered that postage is going up to 70 cents next week, and they couldn't sell be 70 cent stamps yet, and buying 60 cent stamps would be pointless after Monday, so I left empty handed. Zoe was eyeing off the umbrellas they had for sale in the post office.

No sooner had we walked out of the post office and Zoe managed to walk all over her umbrella and totally destroy it. If I hadn't seen it happen, I'd have said she did it deliberately to get a new umbrella, but it really was an accident, so we had to turn around and buy one of the umbrellas from the post office.

We made our way back down Oxford Street, and stopped in the boutique toy shop there. Zoe was particularly enthralled by the musical jewelery boxes, and really wanted one. I negotiated with her for it to be a birthday present, and got it gift wrapped. She seemed fine with the idea of not being able to have it until her birthday.

We then made our way back to the car and drove home for a rather late lunch. I'm glad Zoe had the hot cross bun after the bank to keep her going, as she didn't seem to mind the late lunch at all.

I made fritters with some left over corned beef, and then after we'd had lunch I thought we might as well get out of the house.

Zoe's Kindergarten has a working bee on Saturday (I'm expecting it'll get canceled due to the wet weather, though). Incidentally, I have no idea where the "bee" in "working bee" comes from. Megan's Dad is Welsh, and I was lost for words when it came to explaining what a working bee was. Anyway, I wanted to get some gardening gloves, so we went to Bunnings. I managed to find some cute little kids ones as well, so Zoe can help.

After Bunnings, we went to the pet shop to get some more cat litter. The pet shop seems to be a great source of entertainment for Zoe. She absolutely loved playing around with the hutches they had on display, and checking out all the fish, and the aquarium accessories.

We eventually made it out of the pet shop, and we went around to the adjacent shopping mall in search of some craft supplies at some of the cheap shops there. It turns out the cheap shops are also a great source of entertainment.

By the time we were done there, it was time to get home so Sarah could pick Zoe up, so we headed home. There was enough time for Zoe to watch a little bit of TV before Sarah arrived.

So despite the weather, and no real plan for the day, we managed to completely fill the day, and Zoe had a great time. She seemed no worse for wear for powering through without a nap. There was a few small tantrums at Bunnings, but that mostly revolved around her tipping over her miniature shopping trolley.

Categories: thinktime

TasLUG: Hobart Submitting LCA 2017 Bid!

Thu 27th Mar 2014 23:03
We're excited to tell you that fellow LUGgers Chris Neugebauer and Craige McWhirter have laid the groundwork to put in a bid to get Linux.conf.au back to Hobart for 2017!



Starting this year, Linux Australia started announcing the successful bids for future conferences on a two year cycle, so while we have plenty of time before an actual LCA would arrive in Hobart, we need to get our bid in now!



The intention to bid was announced on the Linux Australia mailing list here.



If you would like to help out by volunteering to be part of the bid team, and later to help bring about a successful conference, please get in contact with Chris - you will find his email in the above annoucement link, drop a note on the TasLUG mailing list or drop by our IRC channel #taslug on FreeNode.

Categories: thinktime

Michael Fox: Simpana 10 – Linux client prepost command execution failure

Thu 27th Mar 2014 21:03

Came across an interesting condition today, which took me a bit of testing to identify why the job would go into a pending state. This one relates to Simpana 10 on a Linux client where you have a File System iDA with a PrePost command being executed. In my test below the script is doing nothing special, it’s merely to have something to execute to show the behavior. I’ve provided it below purely for reference.

[root@jldb1 bin]# cat pre-scan.sh #!/bin/sh # test # echo $1 $2 $3 $4 $5 $6 $7 $8 $9 >> /root/pre-scan.log exit 0

Job goes pending and produced the following errors and output below;

JPR (Job Pending Record)

Error Code: [7:75]

Description: Unable to run [/usr/local/bin/pre-scan.sh] on client.

Source: jwcs, Process: startPrePostCmd

[JobManager.log – commserve]

3024  d88   03/27 18:16:26 21  Scheduler  Set pending cause [Unable to run [/usr/local/bin/pre-scan.sh] on the client.                 ]::Client [jwcs] Application [startPrePostCmd] Message Id [117440587] RCID [0] ReservationId [0].  Level [0] flags [0] id [0] overwrite [0] append [0] CustId[0]. 3024  118c  03/27 18:16:26 21  Scheduler  Phase [Failed] message received from jwcs.lab.heimic.net] Module [startPrePostCmd] Token [21:3:1] restartPhase [0] 3024  118c  03/27 18:16:26 21  JobSvr Obj Phase [3-Pre Scan] for Backup Job Failed. Backup will continue with phase [Pre Scan].

[startPrePostCmd.log - commserve]

4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:46 ### Init() - Initializing job control [token=21:3:7,cn=jwcs], serverName [jwcs.lab.heimic.net], ControlFlag [1], Job Id [21] 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:47 ### Cvcl::init() - CVCL: Running in FIPS Mode 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:48 ### CVJobCtrlLog::registerProcess(): successfully created file [C:\Program Files\CommVault\Simpana\Base\JobControl\4.940] 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:48 ### ::main() - jobId 21 - restoreTaskId = 0 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:48 ### ::main() - jobId 21 - adminTaskId = 0 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:48 ### ::getBackupCmdAndMachine() - jobId 21 - before construct application id 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 ### ::getBackupCmdAndMachine() - appTypeId = 29 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 ### ::getBackupCmdAndMachine() - jobId 21 - symbolic AppId = 2:20 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 ### ::getBackupCmdAndMachine() - jobId 21 - prePostId = 1 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 ### ::getBackupCmdAndMachine() - jobId 21 - preifind cmd = /usr/local/bin/pre-scan.sh 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 ### ::main() - jobId 21 - commandPath = /usr/local/bin/pre-scan.sh 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  ::main() - jobId 21 - before execute cmd 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  ::main() - jobId 21 - Use Local System Acct. 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  ::main() - jobId 21 - remoteexename = [/usr/local/bin/pre-scan.sh] 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  ::main() - jobId 21 - args = [ -bkplevel 1 -attempt 7 -job 21] 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  executePrePostCmd() -  Attempting to execute remote command on client [jldb1].. 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  executePrePostCmd() - jobId 21 - Received error text from server cvsession [Unknown Error] 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  executePrePostCmd() - jobId 21 - Error [0] returned from executeRemoteCommand /usr/local/bin/pre-scan.sh 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  EvEvent::setMsgEventArguments() - MsgId[0x0700004b], Arg[1] = [117440623] 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  EvEvent::setMsgEventArguments() - MsgId[0x0700004b], Arg[2] = [/usr/local/bin/pre-scan.sh] 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  EvEvent::setMsgEventArguments() - MsgId[0x0700004b], Arg[3] = [] 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  EvEvent::setMsgEventArguments() - [MsgId[0x0700004b][]: [3] Args Pushed, [1] Args expected. 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  ::exitHere() - jobId 21 - Exiting due to failure. 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:49 21  BKP CALLED COMPLETE (PHASE Status::FAIL), 21. Token [21:3:7] 4940  e4c   03/27 20:21:53 21  ::exitHere() - jobId 21 - startPrePostCmd Terminating Event. 4940  238c  03/27 20:21:53 21  CVJobCtrlLog::unregisterProcess(): successfully removed file [C:\Program Files\CommVault\Simpana\Base\JobControl\4.940]

[cvd.log – client]

30846 427e0940 03/27 20:21:50 ### [CVipcD] Requests from non-CS with hostname [jwcs.lab.heimic.net] and clientname [jwcs] to execute in user entered path are not allowed

I worked out this problem is caused by lack of value in regkey sCSGUID as found in the location below;

/etc/CommVaultRegistry/Galaxy/Instance001/CommServe/.properties

Sample below;

[root@jldb1 ]# cat /etc/CommVaultRegistry/Galaxy/Instance001/CommServe/.properties | more bCSConnectivityAvailable 1 sCSCLIENTNAME jwcs sCSGUID sCSHOSTNAME jwcs.lab.heimic.net sCSHOSTNAMEinCSDB jwcs.lab.heimic.net

sCSGUID should be populated and its lack of value causes this condition with pre-scan script execution.

Fix:

Easiest method to recreate this regkey value is to do a local uninstall of the simpana services on the client. Revoke the client certificate in Simpana Console via Control Panel – Certificate Administration for the client in question. Followed by a reinstall.

Observation:

Subclients that have no scripts being executed as part of the backup will run fine if this regkey value is missing. You will never see a problem until you add a script. In addition, clients that have a simpana firewall configuration will be broken and subclients without scripts will break too. As the regkey value is used for simpana firewall configuration exchange I believe based on my testing.

Hope you enjoy my post… drop me a comment if you like the content and/or it helps you.

Categories: thinktime

Russell Coker: The Aspie Accent

Thu 27th Mar 2014 11:03

I am often asked about my “accent”. The most common guess is that it’s a “British” accent, while I lived in London for about a year I don’t think that my accent changed much during that time (people have commented on the way I speak since I was in primary school). Also there isn’t a “British accent” anyway, the Wikipedia page of Regional Accents of English has the first three sections devoted to accents in the island of Britain (and Northern Ireland is part of the United Kingdom which people often mean when they sat “Britain”). The Received Pronounciation is the main BBC accent and the accent that is most associated with Britain/England/the UK (which are three different things even though most people don’t know it) and I don’t think that I sound like that at all.

I’ve had various other guesses, the Netherlands (where I lived for a few years but mostly spoke to other foreigners), New Zealand (which I’ve visited a couple of times for conferences), Denmark (the closest I got was attending a conference in Sweden), and probably others I can’t remember.

If I actually had developed an accent from another country then it would probably be from the US. The amount of time I’ve spent watching Hollywood movies and watching US TV shows greatly exceeds the amount of time I’ve spent listening to people from all other countries. The fact that among all the people who wanted to try and guess where my accent supposedly originated none have ever included the US seems like strong evidence to suggest that I don’t have any sort of accent that really derives from another country. Also I have never had someone mistake me for being a resident of their own country based on accent which seems like clear evidence that all claims about me having a foreign accent are bogus.

Autism forums such as WrongPlanet.net [1] always turn up plenty of results for a search on “accent”. In such discussions it seems that a “British accent” is most common mistake and there are often theories raised about why that is – often related to speaking in a formal or precise way or by using a large vocabulary. Also in such discussions the list of countries that people supposedly have accents from is very inclusive, it seems that any country that the listener has heard of but doesn’t know that well is a good candidate. The fact that Aspies from outside the US are rarely regarded as having an American accent could be due to the fact that Hollywood has made most of the world population aware of what most American accents sound like.

Also if I really had some sort of accent from another country then probably someone would comment on that when I’m outside Australia. When I’m travelling people tend to recognise my accent as Australian, while it doesn’t please me when someone thinks that I sound like Crocodile Dundee (as happened in the Netherlands) it might not be entirely inaccurate.

This is Annoying

The way the issue of accent is raised is generally in the form of people asking where I’m from, it seems to imply that they don’t think I belong in Australia because of the way I speak. It’s particularly annoying when people seem unable to realise that they are being obnoxious after the first wrong guess. When I reply “no” to the first “are you from $COUNTRY” question and don’t offer any further commentary it’s not an invitation to play 20 questions regarding where I’m supposedly from, it’s actually an indication that I’m not interested in a conversation on that topic. A Social Skills 101 course would include teaching people that when someone uses one-word answers to your questions it usually means that they either don’t like your questions or don’t want to talk to you.

Social Skills vs Status

The combination of persistence and misreading a social situation which are involved when someone interrogates me about my supposed accent are both parts of the diagnostic criteria for Autism. But I generally don’t get questions about my “accent” in situations where there are many Aspies (IE anything related to the Free Software community). I think that this is because my interactions with people in the Free Software community are based around work (with HR rules against being a jerk) and community events where no-one would doubt that I belong.

I mostly get questions about my “accent” from random middle-class white people who feel entitled to query other people about their status who I meet in situations where there is nothing restraining them from being a jerk. For example random people I meet on public transport.

Related posts:

  1. I’m an Aspie I’ve recently been diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome (AS) [1]. Among...
  2. Aspie Social Skills and the Free Software Community LWN has an article by Valerie Aurora titled “The dark...
Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 57: UnderWater World (now known as Sea Life: Mooloolaba)

Thu 27th Mar 2014 00:03

My late biological maternal grandmother ("Nana"), remarried late in her life to a long-time friend named Bryce. I was probably an early teenager. He was a nice guy, and I kept in loose contact with him after my Nana passed away.

After my Nana passed away, he moved out of the retirement home he'd been living in with my Nana, and in with one of his sons. Sometime before I moved back to Australia, in ailing physical health, he moved from his son's place into Masonic Care's aged-care hostel in Sandgate.

He turned 90 last year. Mentally, he's doing pretty good. Physically, he's very wobbly on his legs. He's had a few falls, which was the main catalyst for moving from his son's place to the aged-care hostel. Other than that, he's in pretty good physical health though.

I remember the first time I visited him in the hostel. After I left, I wept uncontrollably. Here was a man who was literally just waiting out the rest of his life in a small cupboard of a room. I was appalled at how small the room was, and the fact that he was just sitting around waiting to die really upset me.

I've visited him a few times since I've been back. I've taken him over to my parent's place when I've taken Zoe to visit them, just so he gets out.

I should say that I'm sure his own family do spend some time with him, so it's not like he's spending all his time rotting in this place, but probably still a fair chunk of it. Growing old sucks.

Yesterday, when the weather forecast for today was looking like it was going to be pretty wet and miserable, I decided I'd use the day to take Zoe to Underwater World (which I've since learned has rebranded it self as "Sea Life: Mooloolaba".

I had the presence of mind to call up Bryce yesterday to see if he'd like to join us today. We had to pass in his general direction to get up there, so it wasn't particularly out of my way. He informed me that he was now in a wheelchair, which I thought was fine for this excursion.

So this morning, after we got ourselves going, we stopped at Sandgate to pick up Bryce, and made it to Underwater World by about 10am. I was a bit leery of the drive, because from home, it was another 30 minutes on top of the drive to Wet and Wild, and 15 minutes on top of the drive to Sea World, so I wasn't sure how Zoe would take that length car trip.

It turned out that she took it pretty well. She started getting a bit restless in the last 30 minutes, but it was manageable.

I was a little apprehensive about how wrangling Zoe and looking after a frail 90 year old in a wheelchair was going to work out. It turned out it worked out just fine. I could leave Bryce wherever he was, if I had to chase after Zoe, and Zoe quite liked helping push the wheelchair around. Towards the end of the day, when she got tired, I could just pop her in Bryce's lap, and push the pair of them around.

It was a really good outing. I have only vague memories of visiting the place in my childhood, and it's become significantly better since then. Zoe really enjoyed going through the glass tunnels under the main ocean exhibit. We did several laps of that. We were fortunate enough to catch the sting ray feeding almost immediately upon arrival, and we also saw the seal show and made the otter feeding. The place was more focused on salt water aquatic life, hence the name, but there was also some freshwater exhibits.

I never thought that much of the Monterey Aquarium, much preferring the California Academy of Science's aquariums, especially in terms of drive time accessibility. If you ignore the freshwater/salt water diversity, I think Sea Life is even better than the California Academy of Sciences.

We left at about 2pm, and after a lot of hunting around, tracked down the photo they took when we entered, and then drove home closer to 3pm. To my surprise, Zoe didn't fall asleep immediately, but she did fall asleep on the way back to Bryce's place. She woke up to say goodbye to him, and then we drove home, stopping off in the Valley to check my post office box along the way, and arrived back home about 15 minutes before Sarah arrived to pick her up. It ended up being a very full day.

Bryce really enjoyed himself, and I felt really happy that I was able to relatively easily brighten up his day. I've resolved to try another such outing again, I just need to figure out what to do.

I thought I'd try for a 10km run, but it started to rain at the 4km mark. I was also not feeling particularly confident about lasting the distance, so I decided to just turn it into a 5km run instead.

Categories: thinktime

Michael Still: The Hot Gate

Wed 26th Mar 2014 20:03






ISBN: 9781451638189

LibraryThing

This book follows on from Live Free or Die and Citadel. This time we focus solely on Dana as she is transferred to a new unit. The story is interesting, although perhaps it focusses on the dysfunction of the Latin American countries a little more than is really necessary. More interestingly, the book ends the series (as best as I can tell) in an unusual manner for a book like this, with the humans not winning a simple out right victory -- moral or otherwise. Overall, a fun light read.



Tags for this post: book john_ringo alien invasion combat troy_rising

Related posts: Citadel; Live Free or Die; Isaac Asimov's Robot City: Robots and Aliens: Humanity; Isaac Asimov's Robot City: Robots and Aliens: Maverick; Dragon's Egg; Starquake Comment Recommend a book
Categories: thinktime

Colin Charles: Social events at Percona Live Santa Clara

Wed 26th Mar 2014 18:03

One good thing about going to the MySQL UC is the fact that you will interact with many people and you benefit from social events in the evenings. In its heyday, I recall you get no more than 4 hours of sleep a night, because you’re busy with people for up to 20 hours a day. Meetings, drinks, the hallway track are also all very interesting. That’s the added value of going to an event besides just the learning.

Monday is open source appreciation day and I know there will be drinks planned on Monday evening (31.03) at least from the CentOS Dojo crew. Tuesday (01.04) brings on the welcome reception (4.30-6.30pm), while Wednesday is the community dinner at Pedro’s (7-10pm). MariaDB.com (SkySQL) has graciously offered to pay the first $500 of the bar bill, and as a Pedro’s regular I can tell you the martinis are pretty good.

Thursday (03.04) is the Community Network Reception (5.30-8.30pm) with the awards and lightning talks, which is a must attend event. While not part of the conference, after the reception I’d personally head over to Taste restaurant for more community bonding.

Friday is sadly the day many of us will leave (I am no exception). I expect to usually be all around the Hyatt as well as at the Evolution Cafe/Bar (hotel bar) which is where lots of conversation happen.

Bits of advice: drink plenty of water. It is costly in the hotel but I’m sure you can be creative with getting a bottle and filling it regularly. Bring some cash – split dinners are hard to do with a credit card, so cash goes a long way. For the non-Americans reading this, have some dollar bills – tipping is customary. Bring plenty of business cards, and carry a notebook + pen in your pocket at all times (you will have long action items post-conference week, I’m sure of it).

Related posts:

  1. MariaDB at Percona Live Santa Clara
  2. Percona Live Santa Clara 2013 tutorial schedule out
  3. Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo Santa Clara 2014
Categories: thinktime

Michael Fox: Simpana 10 – Specifying the Media Parameters for RMAN Command Line Operations – example

Wed 26th Mar 2014 15:03

An recent addition to Simpana 10 Oracle iDA over Simpana 9 was the ability to specify Media Parameters for RMAN Command Line Operations, which wasn’t possible in Simpana 9.

Below is an example on its use, and the documentation link for review is here.

The client in this example is “jwora1″ running Windows 2008 R2 x64 and an Oracle 11gR2 64bit release. Simpana 10 with a SP4 is installed on client and Commserve – “jwcs”.

RMAN Script:

run { allocate channel ch1 type 'sbt_tape' PARMS="BLKSIZE=262144,ENV=(CVOraSbtParams=C:\p.txt,CvClientName=jwora1,CvInstanceName=Instance001)" trace 2; backup current controlfile; }

Contents of p.txt file below;

[sp] SP_Main-jwma1 [mediaagent] jwma1

Below is a look at the GUI configuration for the Oracle instance “orcl” on client “jwora1″ which shows that third party command line backups should use Storage Policy (SP) – “SP_Main-jwcs”. However as you will not by the running of the job using the Media Parameters it will use a different SP and MediaAgent, as defined by the p.txt file I passed.

subclient not configured with any SP

orcl properties showing command line backup should use SP – SP_Main-jwcs by default.

orcl properties showing log backups would use SP – SP_Main_jwcs by default

sample execution of my rman backup script – current control file backup

Commserve Job Controller showing the running job. Note which MediaAgent is used and SP.

If you find my posts of value, please send me some feedback. Especially if you find this post and it helps you in your travels.

UPDATE: And to follow on from the example above, the following is also possible too. If you don’t pass the CvClientName and CvInstanceName on the channel allocation, you can pull those too from the parameters file. Sample below of alternative backup script syntax and parameters file contents. All documented on the documentation link provided top of post.

RMAN Script:

run { allocate channel ch1 type 'sbt_tape' PARMS="BLKSIZE=262144,ENV=(CVOraSbtParams=C:\p2.txt)" trace 2; backup current controlfile; }

Contents of p2.txt file:

[sp] SP_Main-jwma1 [mediaagent] jwma1 [CvClientName] jwora1 [CvInstanceName] Instance001

The parameter file can have spaces between the definitions like in the top example, which I prefer, as it makes the file easier to read. Where as the p2.txt file has no extra spaces, which also works but makes it harder to read personally.

Enjoy.

Categories: thinktime

Colin Charles: Open Source Appreciation Day at Percona Live

Wed 26th Mar 2014 15:03

I wrote previously about Percona Live Santa Clara 2014, and I want to bring to your attention something Percona has done that is very nice to open source communities: have an open source appreciation day.

Its before the conference (so on Monday), and you get a choice between the CentOS Dojo (great lineup there including many from Red Hat, Monty from MariaDB, and PeterZ from Percona) or the OpenStack Today (another great lineup there). I’d split my time between both the events if time permitted, except I’m flying in on that day.

I can highly recommend going to either as registration (Free) gets you access to the expo hall & keynotes as well. That’s a saving of $75!!!

Remember to register for the conference where the discount code is still SeeMeSpeak. As a bonus, Serg and I have additional talks now, so there will be more MariaDB goodness at the conference. See you next week!

Related posts:

  1. Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo Santa Clara 2014
  2. MariaDB at Percona Live Santa Clara
  3. Percona Live Santa Clara 2013 tutorial schedule out
Categories: thinktime

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