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Stewart Smith: New libeatmydata release: 105

Planet Linux Australia - Thu 30th Oct 2014 10:10

Over on the project page and on launchpad you can now download libeatmydata 105.

This release fixes a couple of bugs that came in via the Debian project, including a rather interesting one about some binaries not running .so ctors to properly init libeatmydata and the code path in the libeatmydata open() not really dealing with being called first in this situation.

Enjoy!

Categories: thinktime

Unlocking Epilepsy wins Prime Minister’s award

Teaser:  Laureate Professor Sam Berkovic AC and Professor Ingrid Scheffer AO from the University of Melbourne have been awarded the 2014 Prime Minister’s Prize for Science.

This article originally appeared on the Melbourne Newsroom. View the original here.

Professors Sam Berkovic and Ingrid Scheffer have changed the way the world thinks about epilepsy.

For their contribution to the study of epilepsy, its diagnosis, management and treatment, they have been awarded the $300,000, 2014 Prime Minister’s Prize for Science.

Professor Ingrid Scheffer and Professor Sam Berkovic

read more

Categories: thinktime

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Meg Howie, Joshua Hesketh

Planet Linux Australia - Thu 30th Oct 2014 08:10
Meg Howie Ask Away: Staking Out the Stakeholders

11:35am Friday 16th January 2015

Meg is a designer and thinker whose practice spans graphic, interactive, film, service and performance design. She is currently undertaking a Master of Design at Massey University and her research explores the influence of open source culture and participatory democracy on civic engagement. Meg’s work is deeply social, and draws from human-centred design, behavioural psychology and collaborative modes of working.

For more information on Meg and her presentation, see here. You can follow her as @howiemeg and don’t forget to mention #LCA2015.



Joshua Hesketh Who is Linux Australia?

3:40pm Thursday 15th January 2015

Joshua is a software developer for Rackspace Australia working on upstream OpenStack. He works from his home in Hobart, Tasmania. Joshua is currently President of Linux Australia, previously the co-chair for PyCon Australia and a key organiser for linux.conf.au. He has an interest in robotics having recently completed a degree in mechatronic engineering. Josh is an active contributor to the openstack-infra and nova projects.

For more information on Josh and his presentation, see here.

Categories: thinktime

This is not a promotion

Seth Godin - Thu 30th Oct 2014 02:10
The internet and big media are wrestling with chokepoints. Cable TV companies, for example, are a natural monopoly in the home. Everyone only has one provider. If the provider has an argument with a TV network, they kick them off,...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 273: Kindergarten, more startup stuff, and another Prep day

Planet Linux Australia - Wed 29th Oct 2014 22:10

I had another busy day today. I've well and truly falled off the running wagon, which I really need to fix rather urgently. I would have liked to have gone for a run this morning, but it didn't happen.

I started off with a chiropractic adjustment, and then a bit of random cooking to use up some perishables, before the cleaners arrived.

While the cleaners were here, I managed to knock over another unit of my real estate course, which I was pretty stoked about. I'll try and get it in the mail tomorrow, and that's the last one from the first half of the course done.

I grabbed a massage, and then headed over to pick up Zoe early from Kindergarten to take her to school for another Prep introduction session. I really like Zoe's school. This year for the first time they're running a four week program where the kids can come for a couple of hours.

Today it was fine and gross motor skills. They divided the group in half, and Zoe's half did fine motor skills first. The kids rotated through three different stations, which all had three or four activities each. Zoe did pretty well with these.

Then the groups swapped over, and we returned to the hall where we started, to do some gross motor skills. I would have thought this would have been right up Zoe's alley, since a lot of it was similar to TumbleTastics, but she was very clingy, and they kept rotating between stations faster than she got warmed up to the activity.

She was a bit overwhelmed in the larger group setting in general. Hopefully next week with a bit of preparation before we come (and no Kindergarten) she'll do better.

After we got home, I showed Zoe a balloon full of water that I'd put in the freezer. She had a great time smashing it on the balcony. I'll have to do that again.

It's a hot night tonight, I hope Zoe sleeps okay. It was definitely time to bust out the fan.

Categories: thinktime

But what do *you* do?

Seth Godin - Wed 29th Oct 2014 20:10
Do you make your own paper? Do you start with wood pulp and mix and bleach and set and produce the sheets you use? My guess is that you save time (and a lot of money) and just go to...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Lev Lafayette: Training and Education in High Performance Computing for eReseachers

Planet Linux Australia - Wed 29th Oct 2014 11:10

"Big data" requires processing. Processing requires HPC. Increased processing results in increased research output. Research organisations that do not increase HPC usage will fall behind. HPC requires either 'dumb down the interface or skill up the user'. Making "user friendly" interfaces may not be the right path to take as HPC use will always have a minimum level of complexity. Training courses that use andragogical technqiues correlate with increased HPC use.

Presentation to eResearch Australasia, Melbourne, October 28, 2014

Categories: thinktime

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Christoph Lameter, Brandon Philips

Planet Linux Australia - Wed 29th Oct 2014 08:10
Christoph Lameter SL[AUO]B:Kernel memory allocator design and philosophy

12:15pm Friday 16th January 2015

Christoph specializes in High Performance Computing and High Frequency Trading technologies. As an operating system designer and kernel developer he has been developing memory management technologies for Linux to enhance performance and reduce latencies. He is fond of new technologies and new ways of thinking that disrupt existing industries and causes new development communities to emerge.

For more information on Christoph and his presentation, see here. You can follow him as @qant and don’t forget to mention #LCA2015.



Brandon Philips CoreOS: An introduction

11:35 am Friday 16th January 2015

Brandon is a systems developer, looking to work in Linux kernel and systems development. He has experience working with the community and writing professionally for magazines and online journals.

He likes developing software using C, BASH, Java, PHP, MySQL, sockets and pthreads. He also hacks on the Linux Kernel including the development of patch sets. Managing and using Debian, Gentoo and Windows systems.

Brandon has also been a speaker at many conferences including Open Source Bridge 2012 and Open Source Conference 2012.

For more information on Brandon and his presentation, see here. You can follow him as @BrandonPhilips and don’t forget to mention #LCA2015.

Categories: thinktime

This week's sponsor: Hack Reactor

a list apart - Wed 29th Oct 2014 00:10

Thanks to Hack Reactor for sponsoring A List Apart this week. Hack Reactor is currently accepting applications for its 12-week, immersive online coding school, Remote Beta. Apply today.

Categories: thinktime

Rachel Andrew on the Business of Web Dev: Seeing Past the Highlight Reel

a list apart - Tue 28th Oct 2014 23:10

I am not the sort of person who “airs her dirty laundry in public.” I wouldn’t walk into a mixed group of friends, colleagues, and complete strangers at a party and announce something deeply personal, and so it is with Twitter. For me, Twitter is a place to chat, a replacement for the Telnet Talkers I was so fond of in the 1990s. I share things I think are interesting, I keep up with what people I know are doing, but I see it as a public place.

Recently, I had a Twitter conversation with someone who felt that people who don’t post about their bad days are being disingenuous. As if trying to keep things positive meant living a lie. However, I’m not pretending to be something I am not. It’s just that there is a filter through which I assess what is appropriate to share.

Unlike those Telnet Talkers, Twitter has essentially become a place where I do business. My “personal brand” enables me to sell books and to gain writing and speaking gigs. It’s not all work: I post photos of my cat, participate in events such as the annual mocking of the Eurovision Song Contest, and relate what I saw while out running. All of it is content I would be happy for my clients, my mother, or my daughter to see.

I know many other people have the same filter. Our filters may allow a little more or a little less through, but any of us operating professionally online have to leave things unsaid. If we show ourselves as being vulnerable via Twitter or Facebook, tell other people about the battles we face with our own minds, what might that do to our businesses? What if a potential client or employer finds those tweets? Discrimination due to mental health issues is unlawful, in the UK at least, but you can’t legislate against a potential client deciding not to get in touch with a freelancer who once tweeted about their depression.

Despite living our lives in public, developing our filters without really thinking about them, we are still creating real relationships with each other. Via social media we know a lot of the detail of each others’ day-to-day lives—far more detail than we would know of many of the colleagues we work alongside in an office. I count as true friends some people who I rarely get the chance to interact with outside of what is essentially a public place. If we met in person, maybe they would look into my eyes and see the things I don’t speak of. Perhaps I would see the same in theirs.

There is a saying, often used when people are talking about imposter syndrome:

The reason we struggle with insecurity is because we compare our behind-the-scenes with everyone else’s highlight reel.

While this quote is aimed at reassuring the person struggling with insecurity, there is also a person behind the highlight reel. Know that just as we are sharing our own highlights, so are our friends and colleagues.

When we spend time with people, we learn their usual demeanor and we have visual clues to help us know that something is up. We can take that friend to one side and offer a safe place where they can share their struggles without worrying it will cross over into professional life.

The relationships we form online are no less “real” than those we’ve formed face to face. Perhaps we are still learning how to help one another and how to ask for help in this space. Are those tweets sounding slightly less positive because someone having a bad day, or is there more to it? Are those uncharacteristically snarky responses coming from someone who is finding life really tough right now? Can we learn to look out for each other, as the lines between the real world and online blur? We can take our friends to one side virtually—drop them an email, offer a phone or Skype call to “catch up,” then offer a listening ear.

For Geek Mental Help Week I want us to remember that where professional lives are entwined with personal on Twitter, we probably are seeing only the public side of a person. We’re all still learning how to care for each other in these new communities we are creating. For every one of our friends bravely sharing their story this week, there will be many more who are not in a place where they can do so right now. Let’s be aware that those battles may be deeply hidden, be kind to each other, and look out for subtle signs that someone might need somewhere less public to ask for support.

Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 272: Kindergarten, startup stuff

Planet Linux Australia - Tue 28th Oct 2014 22:10

I had a great, productive day today.

I got stuck into my real estate licence coursework this morning, and finished off a unit. I biked down to the post office to mail it off, and picked up the second half of my coursework. After I finish the unit I started today, I'll have 8 more units to go. Looking at the calendar, if I can punch out a unit a week (which is optimistic, particularly considering that school holidays are approaching) I could be finished by the end of the year. More realistically, I can try to be finished by the time Zoe starts school, which will be perfect, and well inside the 12 month period I'm supposed to get it done in. We shall see how things pan out.

I biked to Kindergarten to pick up Zoe, and she wanted to watch Megan's tennis class for a while, so we hung around. She was pretty wiped out from a water play day at Kindergarten today. We biked home, and then she proceeded to eat everything in the house that wasn't tied down until Sarah arrived to pick her up.

I used the rest of the afternoon to do some more administrative stuff and tidy up a bit, before heading off to my yoga class. I had a really lovely stretch class with just me and my yoga teacher, so we spent the whole class chatting and having a great catch up. It was a great way to end the day.

Categories: thinktime

Solving the popular problem

Seth Godin - Tue 28th Oct 2014 20:10
"Do you know the head of FIFA?" "I have come up with a way to speed up airport security dramatically..." "How come the people in script development at Warner won't get back to me about my Matrix idea?" If you're...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

Andrew Pollock: [life] Day 271: Kindergarten, lots of administrivia and some tinkering

Planet Linux Australia - Tue 28th Oct 2014 13:10

Zoe woke up at about 6am, which gave us a bit of extra time to get moving in the morning, or so I thought.

We biked over to the Kindergarten for drop off, and I left the trailer there to make biking back in the afternoon heat easier.

I had a pretty productive day. It was insanely hot, so I figured I could run the air conditioning more or less guilt (and expense free) courtesy of my solar power. I should check just how much power it draws to see how "free" it is to run.

I mostly cleared lots of random stuff off my to do list, and made a few lengthy phone calls. I also did some more tinkering with my BeagleBone Black, trying to get it set up so I can back up daedalus. It's been fun playing with Puppet again. I now have a pretty nice set up where I can wipe the BeagleBone Black and get it back to how I want it configured in about 5 minutes, thanks to Puppet.

I biked over to Kindergarten to pick up. I got there a few minutes early, and received a very heartening phone call regarding an issue I'd been working on earlier.

Zoe and Megan wanted to have a play date, and since it was hot and I'd left the air conditioning on, I suggested it be at our place. I biked home, and Jason dropped Megan around.

The girls played inside for a bit, but then wanted to do some more craft on the balcony, so I let them get to it, with instructions to put stuff away before they took more stuff out, and the balcony ended up significantly cleaner as a result. I used the time to do some more tinkering with my backups and to book a flight down to Sydney to help a friend out with some stuff.

A massive storm rolled in, not long after Anshu arrived, so we all went out on the balcony to watch the lightning, and then Sarah arrived to pick up Zoe. Megan hung out for a bit longer until Jason arrived to pick her up.

Categories: thinktime

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Lillian Grace, David Rowe

Planet Linux Australia - Tue 28th Oct 2014 09:10
Lillian Grace Wiki New Zealand: Winning through collaboration

4:35pm Thursday 15th January 2015

Lillian is the founder and chief of Wiki New Zealand.

Wiki New Zealand is a collaborative website making data about New Zealand visually accessible to everyone. The site presents data in simple, visual form only, so that it remains as unbiased and as accessible to everyone as possible. The content is easy to understand and digest, and is presented from multiple angles, wide contexts and over time, inviting users to compare, contrast and interpret. Lillian is an accomplished presenter who was invited to speak at OSDC 2013, was a keynote speaker at Gather 2014 and a speaker at TEDx Auckland 2013.

For more information on Lillian and her presentation, see here. You can follow her as @GracefulLillian and don’t forget to mention #LAC2015.



David Rowe The Democratisation of Radio

10:40am Thursday 15th January 2015

David is an electronic engineer living in Adelaide, South Australia. His mission is to improve the world – just a little bit, through designing open hardware and writing open source software for telephony.

In January 2006 David quit corporate life as an Engineering Manager to become an open source developer. He now develops open telephony hardware and software full time. David likes to build advanced telephony technology – then give it away.

For more information on David and his presentation, see here. You can follow him as @davidgrowe67 and don’t forget to mention #LAC2015.

Categories: thinktime

The Couch Cone of Silence

a list apart - Tue 28th Oct 2014 02:10

This is Geek Mental Help Week. We’re participating because we want to make it safer for people in our industry to talk about mental health. Join in or follow along at @geekmentalhelp and #geekmentalhelp.

About five years ago, I bought a cushy couch for my office. (Okay, yes, I did get the model that could flatten into an emergency nap station, but let’s just say that I plan for contingencies—it sounds more professional that way.) Our projects required a lot of office-to-office visiting to discuss situations in person, and eventually, said couch (and therefore, my office) became a veritable beacon, attracting anyone looking for an excuse to decompress. Such is the life of a one-couch, 50-chair business.

Project chats could turn quickly into personal deep dives. I learned which to expect by the way people knocked on my door and asked if I was busy. The biggest tip-off was closing of the door as they came in.

Most people just wanted someone to listen. I’d hear grumblings about managers and stress, and sometimes they’d ask for advice. But gradually, I sometimes also heard about anxiety, depression, emotional baggage, counseling, complicated diagnoses, and the merits of medications. Finding out what people were dealing with often left me with absolutely no idea what to say. I’m no therapist.

How was I supposed to respond? Labeling something a “mental health issue” makes it feel amorphous and scary—unknown, subjective territory that’s best left to professionals. But mental health is not a Boolean value; it’s a spectrum we’re all on, and one that’s always fluctuating, though we may define those fluctuations with other names. Some conditions are temporary, some are precipitated by events, some are genetic, and some can be caused by medications taken for innocuous, unrelated reasons. We are complex adaptive systems affected by situations, and no one is on the forever side of “not mentally ill.” In light of that, there is nothing to hide or be ashamed of. No one should feel alone. When our friends and colleagues are struggling, we don’t have to be a professional to help them fight that fight.

It’s very natural to just jump in, but it’s very, very important to first learn about what is going on under the surface and behind the scenes. Internal struggles aren’t easy to see, mental health-related or not. I have a couple of extroverted, life-of-the-party friends who battle major depression, and even overcompensate for it because they are expected to be “the fun ones.” It must be exhausting. Like many, many conditions, depression doesn’t affect everyone in the same way—it isn’t defined so simply as “noticeably sad and constantly crying.” The signs and symptoms vary because the condition (whether temporary or congenital) is just an overlay, a layer, a facet. It doesn’t define the person. In other words, “you’re still you.”

Like my friends, people can do a great job at hiding the dark sides of their struggles. Maybe a coworker is 15-20 minutes late to work every day, but it’s a win for them to be there at all. It took three hours for them to gear up the physical energy to simply get dressed, and everything else they’ve got in the tank to make it home later. Or how about the calmest, most mellow person at the office? Perhaps they’re riding a roller coaster without a seatbelt, experiencing states that take them from happy, energized, and on top of the world to despair and crushing loss in a moment. They’re very aware that they aren’t really feeling those things, yet that’s what they’re feeling. And all because their head is trying to keep standard chemicals in the brain perfectly balanced, only theirs slightly over- and under-calibrates.

Little do you know, they’re making impossible choices—like deciding whether to handle their condition through sheer grit or to take a medication that dulls their symptoms, yet affects acuity as the dosage increases. It might even make them seem glazed over and stoned to someone who didn’t know any better. How do you choose between your health and your job?

It’s also important to mention that many mental health conditions affect quality of life so significantly that they are classified as disabilities—legally afforded accommodations and protections against discrimination. In reality, disclosing disabilities can be devastating to a career. Even advocates at disability services groups cautiously discuss the potential ramifications of sharing with HR, managers, and coworkers. An employee might just as soon be told to “suck it up,” passed over for promotion, not hired in the first place, or shifted slowly to the door, as have the chance of being granted accommodations that would greatly ease their ability to earn a living. But that’s daily life for some: hacking away at an impossible server issue while exploding inside from anxiety, or somehow channeling creative energy into design work when there’s a pull to just end things. It takes guts to go to work every day.

When someone bravely opens up about their lives, they aren’t in search of platitudes, yet we tend to lean on what we’ve seen modeled. That might mean grasping beyond the realm of real experiences. With rare exceptions, movies, TV, and books love to present the extremes—stereotypes for the sake of plot. They treat mental health issues like comic relief, reasons the “heros” of the story should be afraid or on guard, or treat others with pity bordering on condescension. This is disrespectful, ill-informed, and only serves to miseducate on a mass scale, leaving stereotypes and stigma to go hand-in-hand. We’re better than that.

So, how do we respond to and support others in the most respectful and honorable way possible?

Specifically ask how they would like for you to be there and support them. They might just want an open door or someone to have lunch with sometimes. Don’t assume they’re expecting a rescuer or someone to fix things. In this moment, they are just opening up and talking as a means of easing the weight that’s on their shoulders.

Do be a friend who “checks in.” Show that you’re around—you don’t have to talk long, just don’t “disappear” on them.

Do talk about other things, but don’t not talk about the condition, either. They probably don’t want to talk about it all the time, and would love to have a distraction, but it’s also good to ask them about what they’re going through, and for them to explain more about it and suggest good, accurate resources to read.

Don’t assume they’ve forgotten the internet exists. They have likely already been online and investigated the symptoms or condition thoroughly. Think twice before sending them reading materials and links to websites, blogs, forums, or articles, especially those written by others with similar issues. This implies they haven’t thought to look themselves, and there’s a chance that content written by those in worse situations can bring them down and play on fears that things can’t get better. While you’re at it, don’t suggest (or base suggestions for treatment on) movies, TV shows, or books because a character seems to have similar issues.

Don’t say things like, “Can’t you take a pill for that?” It not only diminishes the issue by implying that medication is some sort of cure-all (which it isn’t), someone may not even need medication, may be sensitive to it, already be on some, or have tried many already without finding ones that help. They might even have personal reasons not to take it.

Don’t think they’ve never heard about counseling or treatment. It can be very helpful to talk to a professional, but it is ultimately a personal choice to decide when the time is right to do so, and whom to see.

If they’re an employee, ask what sort of accommodations would help them at work. A willingness to make accommodations and support them is huge, even if they choose not to ask for those accommodations in the end, or they suggest agreeable compromises. Ask what would be best for the particular person, such as if remote work might help or be too isolating, or if a flexible schedule would be best.

One of my personal tenets is this: make time for people. Rejection is subtly transmitted in enumerable ways, so be mindful and learn to listen. We don’t have to know what to do, just know how to be there and how to go about it, whether it’s an afternoon coffee run together, a ready couch, or just letting others know they’re worthwhile.

In our industry in particular, part of our very job is to consider people, their lives, their needs, and how to optimize everything around personal experiences so that no one is left feeling excluded or forgotten. Accessibility and inclusion stand for more than what we craft on a bright screen someplace.

Note: only a trained mental health professional is qualified to make a diagnosis. If you’re coping with personal struggles, know that you have lots of people out there to support you. Reach out to find them, and don’t give up.

Categories: thinktime

James Morris: Linux Security Summit 2014 Wrap-Up

Planet Linux Australia - Tue 28th Oct 2014 00:10

The slides from the 2014 Linux Security Summit in August may be found linked at the schedule.

LWN covered both the James Bottomley keynote, and the SELinux on Android talk by Stephen Smalley.

We had an engaging and productive two days, with strong attendance throughout.  We’ll likely follow a similar format next year at LinuxCon.  I hope we can continue to expand the contributor base beyond mostly kernel developers.  We’re doing ok, but can certainly do better.  We’ll also look at finding a sponsor for food next year.

Thanks to those who contributed and attended, to the program committee, and of course, to the events crew at Linux Foundation, who do all of the heavy lifting logistics-wise.

See you next year!

Categories: thinktime

Munchausen by Proxy by Media

Seth Godin - Mon 27th Oct 2014 20:10
MBP is a particularly tragic form of child abuse. Parents or caregivers induce illness in their kids to get more attention. The thing is, the media does this to us all the time. (Actually, we've been doing it to ourselves,...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

linux.conf.au News: Speaker Feature: Lana Brindley & Alexandra Settle, Olivier Bilodeau

Planet Linux Australia - Mon 27th Oct 2014 11:10
Lana Brindley and Alexandra Settle 8 writers in under 8 months: from zero to a docs team in no time flat

11:35am Thursday 15th January 2015

Lana and Alexandra are both technical writers as Rackspace, the open Cloud Company.

Lana has been writing open source technical documentation for about eight years, and right now I’m working on documenting OpenStack with Rackspace, she does a lot of speaking, mostly about writing. She also talks about other topics from open source software to geek feminism and working in IT.

Lana is also involved in several volunteer projects including linux.conf.au, Girl Geek Dinners, LinuxChix, OWOOT (Oceania Women of Open Tech), and various Linux Users Groups (LUGs). Alexandra is a technical writer with the Rackspace Cloud Builders Australia team. She began her career as a writer for the cloud documentation team at Red Hat, Australia. Alexandra prefers Fedora over other Linux distributions.

Recently she was part of a team that authored the OpenStack Design Architecture Guide, and hopes to further promote involvement in the OpenStack community within Australia.

For more information on Lana and Alexandra and their presentation, see here. You can follow them as @Loquacities (Lana) or @dewsday (Alexandra) and don’t forget to mention #LCA2015.



Olivier Bilodeau Advanced Linux Server-Side, Threats: How they work and what you can do about them

1:20pm Friday 16th January 2015

Olivier is an engineer that loves technology, software, security, open source, linux, brewing beer, travels and android.

Coming from the dusty Unix server room world, Olivier evolved professionally in networking, information security and open source software development to finally become malware researcher at ESET Canada. Presenting at Defcon, publishing in (In)secure Mag, teaching infosec to undergrads (ÉTS), driving the NorthSec Hacker Jeopardy and co-organizer of the MontréHack training initiative are among its note-worthy successes.

For more information on Olivier and his presentation, see here. You can follow him as @obilodeau and don’t forget to mention #LCA2015.

Categories: thinktime

Sridhar Dhanapalan: Twitter posts: 2014-10-20 to 2014-10-26

Planet Linux Australia - Mon 27th Oct 2014 01:10
Categories: thinktime

Pitchcraft

Seth Godin - Sun 26th Oct 2014 20:10
When you present to a board, to potential investors, they ask themselves some questions about your new project: Is there a problem? Do I like the solution—is it free, instant and certain, or at least close enough to be interesting?...         Seth Godin
Categories: thinktime

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